Getting to know Alan Horne

The good, the bad and the ugly of Hughes' debut
We'll forgive his results this time: the kid can pitch

From NJ.com:

Horne, drafted by the Yankees in the 11th round in 2005 after being drafted by Cleveland (2001) and Anaheim (2004) and not sign ing, is in just his second year of pro baseball. The jump from Single-A to Double-A supposedly is the most difficult in a player’s career.

“No, I don’t think I am sur prised,” Horne said after earning the win last night as the Thunder were victorious for the sixth game in a row, a 2-1 victory over the Connecticut Defenders in front of 3,910 at Waterfront Park.

“I have worked hard for a real long time now. Hopefully, it is a lot of hard work paying off.”

“I am just trying to go out there every outing and execute all my pitches,” said Horne, who missed 2002 and 2003 in college due to Tommy John surgery.

“All through spring training I have been concentrating on throw ing more strikes. That was the problem last year. I walked a lot of guys. I am pitching well enough now that I am making the other guys have to hit to score runs. As long as I don’t give them extra base runners, I feel I will be fine.”

Horne is probably my favorite Yankee prospect that is actually pitching these days (I’m talking to you JB). His trouble with walks last year is well documented, but this year he’s completely turned it around, posting a 28-4 K/BB ratio in 22.1 innings. That’s the long running theme amongst pitching prospects, they all have to learn at some point that you have to throw strikes and not be afraid of contact. Thankfully Horne seems to be past that step.

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The good, the bad and the ugly of Hughes' debut
We'll forgive his results this time: the kid can pitch