A matter of ratings

RAB Live Chat
How would you rather see the Sox lose?

It’s all about the numbers for baseball and TV, and this year, the numbers aren’t looking so hot. TBS’s Division Series rounds saw a ratings drop of 20 percent over 2007. While it’s easy to think that the lack of New York teams is to blame, both Los Angeles and Chicago, two of the biggest media markets in the country, had two teams in the first round. Mostly, politics — the Biden/Palin debate was on during two games — and lackluster games are to blame.

On the Yankee front, Richard Sandomir reports that Yankee ratings were down 10 percent this year. While fans went to the stadium for its final year, the folks at home weren’t so keen on watching a third-place team lumber through the season this year.

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RAB Live Chat
How would you rather see the Sox lose?
  • http://www.workwithpete.com Pete

    While fans went to the stadium for its final year, the folks at home weren’t so keen on watching a third-place team lumber through the season this year.

    I actually got quite a bit done around the house this summer & spent more time with my family…

    So this is what it’s like to live in Kansas City!

  • radnom

    All the series went up 2-0. That has got to have played a part in killing the ratings.

  • Reggie C.

    I for one watched re-runs of House, M.D. that last month. Not much fun to watch a team fighting for 3rd place.

  • http://www.puristbleedspinstripes.com Rebecca-Optimist Prime

    The ratings drop are real easy to explain with politics and whatnot…but a Sox/Dodgers world series should get the ratings up.

  • Corey

    only 10? that says a lot of things about the viewer base of the YES and the fans that just can’t get enough yanks.

  • JohnnyC

    I think there’s more fear and trembling in the Wilpon house over the Mets’ 2008 ratings. The season went to the last day and their ratings actually fell 1%.

  • ortforshort

    Cashman better wake up. The way the Yankees make money is to be championship callibre. His obsession with reducing the payroll since he became the big guy in 2005 has led to the 2008 meltdown. A little accounting advice for Cashman: your revenues will go down a lot faster than your payroll will go down if you stop spending. Conversely, your income will stay high if you continue to spend. Seems to be a simple formula, but Cashman doesn’t seem to be capable of grasping it.