Nov
02

Life ain’t so good for Jim Leyrtiz

By

I honestly don’t know what to say about this article in the Times about Jim Leyritz. It recounts his messy 2002 divorce, the fact that he’s dead broke, and of course the accident last year. It’s some tragic stuff. Read for yourselves.

Categories : Asides
  • http://www.riveraveblues.com Ben K.

    That should be required reading for all baseball players. Sad tale.

  • E-ROC

    Those poor kids had it rough. They had to become men before they were even ready.

    • http://www.riveraveblues.com Joseph P.

      Without a doubt the kids are the saddest part of this affair.

  • RustyJohn

    “There is no Yankee fan alive who doesn’t think, regardless of the outcome of the trial, that he deserves one [second chance].”

    Um, I’m a Yankee fan, I’m alive and I don’t think “second chances” should be handed out so easily when the actions of someone kill another person. Call me crazy. According to police reports, he was .14 some three hours after the accident. For an average person, that would be a .20 BAC at the time of the crash.

    Sounds like two parents that acted like self-absorbed children. Boo f’ing hoo, he couldn’t “cope” with life after baseball. My old man dragged his ass out of bed to work two or three jobs at a time and dropped dead of a stroke at 51. I’m quite certain that our livelihoods would have been a bit better had he put in a rough six hour day at the ballpark for a million or two a year.

    As for his attorney, I don’t quite see how he says he’s going to be absolved of all criminal charges unless the officers that responded did just about everything incorrect that could be done- lost evidence, failed to give a breath test properly, beat a confession out of him and didn’t read him his rights. I’d have better hope of him being only partially responsible for the civil case- I didn’t think Florida was a contributory negligence state.

    Yes, it should be required reading and the kids get to grow up with the dysfunction that is mom and dad Leyritz.

    • Steve

      “Um, I’m a Yankee fan, I’m alive and I don’t think “second chances” should be handed out so easily when the actions of someone kill another person. Call me crazy. According to police reports, he was .14 some three hours after the accident. For an average person, that would be a .20 BAC at the time of the crash.”

      . . and if you read the story (and were trying to be fair) you would have also cited that the woman he crashed into was just as drunk as he was. So as it turns out, there was blame on both sides. If one of them was sober, maybe they could have swerved out of danger. Sounds like a tragic accident to me. Without knowing all the facts of the case, and if the only witnesses were either drunk or dead, it will be hard to prove which one of them actually ran the red light.

      • Chris C.

        “. . and if you read the story (and were trying to be fair) you would have also cited that the woman he crashed into was just as drunk as he was. So as it turns out, there was blame on both sides.”

        More on his side though, because she was at least following the the rules of the road. The accident happend where his car shoudln’t have been. They were BOTH negligent, but he caused the accident. Perhaps he’ll get a reduced sentence because of that. When they got into their cars, they were EQUALLY culpable. After that, there’s fault for the accident.

        “Without knowing all the facts of the case, and if the only witnesses were either drunk or dead, it will be hard to prove which one of them actually ran the red light.”

        The only eyewitnesses were drunk? That’s not what I read when the accident happened last December. I don’t think there’s any question, according to police, on who ran the light.
        I feel for Leyritz, I really do. And especially for his kids. But he shouldn’t be totally off the hook.

        • Steve

          “The only eyewitnesses were drunk? That’s not what I read when the accident happened last December. I don’t think there’s any question, according to police, on who ran the light.”

          Well if there’s a piece of info I missed then please dig it up for me, but that’s the impression I have. And don’t take the Police’s word as Gospel. Their job is to show up after the fact and gather all relevant info, thats it. Not to decide guilt. Its up to the lawyers, judge and jury to figure out who’s at fault, and it’s rarely as cut and dry as it originally appears to be. There are laws involved, conflicting testimony and even in cases where a guy seems guilty as Hell, he can still be innocent. I’ve been through a traffic accident case and can tell you that people claim all sorts of things that simply aren’t true.

    • http://www.riveraveblues.com Joseph P.

      “As for his attorney, I don’t quite see how he says he’s going to be absolved of all criminal charges unless the officers that responded did just about everything incorrect that could be done- lost evidence, failed to give a breath test properly, beat a confession out of him and didn’t read him his rights. I’d have better hope of him being only partially responsible for the civil case- I didn’t think Florida was a contributory negligence state.”

      I think my least favorite line in the piece was when Leyritz’s lawyer said “he was not negligent.” He got behind the wheel drunk. He ran a red light. That’s two instances of negligence independent of the victim’s level of toxicity.

      • http://www.riveraveblues.com Ben K.

        That’s pretty much negligence per se. It’s going to be tough to argue that one away.

        (Perhaps some of the lawyers who read can elaborate or correct me. That’s at least as I understand it, and I’m sitting in torts class right now.)

  • JeffG

    Very sad indeed. Joba should read this just in case he isn’t sure already what a dumb thing he did. It’s funny how many people make this mistake because we really don’t consider the consequences of our actions.
    Both drivers were extremely drunk at the time of the accident. Two families were punished. I personally don’t think he should receive jail time. I do think he should have to support his family and the person’s who died in this accident. If the Baseball Assistance Team cares enough to watch out for his children they should also care enough to assist the children he left without their mother.
    I hope Jim would take this as a chance to become a real man and live a better life. If it means him driving a fork lift or digging a ditch somewhere he should sacrifice a bit to help those he is responsible for. I believe everyone always has a second chance. It may not consist of going back to where you once were but rather going on from where you are. If he does the right thing and tries to get a real job and live a clean life he should be proud of himself. However, to believe he is only capable of living off of his fame and hope the world gets handed to him again would not be redeeming himself in any way.
    When we screw up we try to fix it by our own hand. That is character. He should look for any work he can find and I wish him all the best in taking care of the lives he should feel responsible for.

    • Steve

      “If he does the right thing and tries to get a real job and live a clean life he should be proud of himself. ”

      I don’t think you meant that the way it came out, but nothing he will ever do will make this incident or the rest of his life in any way admirable. And he could probably do a lot more good going around speaking about the dangers of drunk driving than he ever could ‘digging a ditch’ somewhere.

      • JeffG

        Right I’m not saying he should be proud of himself for what happened. You’d have to be crazy to believe that. Nothing is ever going erase what happened, but he can be a better person going forward and hopefully there will be days and deeds ahead that he can be proud of.
        It seems that in his life, outside of baseball, Leyritz has been a pretty big loser and has no one to blame but the guy in the mirror. But there is something to be said for those who turn their life around. Even if he’s only proving it to himself, his family, and hopefully the people he affected by this accident.
        I agree that he could do well to speak out about the tradgety trying to help others. Yet in the article it looks like he hasen’t worked at all over the last year, and if that is the case, diggin a ditch, mowing someone’s lawn, cleaning toilets, would be a step up. Taking responsibility for what he did. Realizing there is another family that is struggling and busting his ass in any way possible to make it a little better – that is the right thing to do. But if he’s sitting around on his ass, whallowing in self pity, that is far worse that him trying to rebuild some self respect and move forward to do what’s right. If the speaking jobs never come he’s got to pull himself up and do whatever it takes.

  • Mark B.

    Anyone who goes out drinking and decides to drive afterwards should read this piece to realize what that one last drink can turn into…….

    • DonnieBaseballHallofFame

      I agree. But this is about more than just one drink or one night to me.

      It is the fact that as Americans the culture is that its not only ok but cool to get wasted and hang out late in bars and drive home.

      Baseball promotes beer very very hard. So does football. They get a ton of their money from it. I stopped going to a lot of games because of the sort of people who seem to be the majority at games now. Angry drunken frat boy types yet they are in their 30′s, 40′s and 50′s.

      I do not feel sorry for Jimmy. Jimmy made millions of dollars and he made bad choices, nobody else made them for him. I feel bad for the kids of the woman Jimmy killed. I feel bad for Jimmys kids. But no I do not feel bad for Jimmy.

      And I was about as big of a fan of him as anybody. I predicted he was going to hit that homer in game 4 right before it happened. I know without Jimmy there would be no 96 championship. But as fans we do not have to back or support this guy just because he chose to do these dumb activities.

      It may be easier for some people who drink and drive to sympathize with this guy but I am not one of them.

      • Marty Puccio

        “I predicted he was going to hit that homer in game 4 right before it happened.”

        sure you did.

        • DonnieBaseballHallofFame

          Well I did. I did not do it on national television. Just in a room with someone special who still remembers it. I am sure I also predicted several home runs that never have happened over the course of my baseball watching career. Lighten up there pal.

      • Chris C.

        Baseball promotes beer very very hard. So does football.

        Wait a minute here……I disagree with this. I think professional sports has come a long way on NOT promoting alcohol or cigarettes or any of the other vices they used to allow their atheletes to become spokespeople for.

        They all stop selling beer in their stadiums at least 1 hour before they estimate the event will end. They have players who do ads on the ills of drinking and driving. What more do you want them to do?
        Not sell beer at all? Nonsense. There are a ton of responsible people who like to go to ballgames and have a beer or two.
        No matter what these leagues do, there will always be people who abuse alcohol, and there will always be people pointing to the league as the reason. Can’t fault the individual, apparently.

        So tell me…..how has baseball been promoting beer “very hard”?

  • Ron

    His attorney certainly has a future as a politician, with spin like this:

    “Not only was he not negligent, but she was the direct and proximate cause of the accident.”

    Um, he was 1) drunk and 2) ran a red light. But nope, the victim was the cause of the accident.

    • Chris C.

      First of all, he was hired as Leyritz’ atorney. His job is to get as much leniency for his client as possible. That does not make him a politician.

      Second of all, the fact that the victim was drunk may INDEED have an impact on the final decision that will be made. His lawyer would be negligent in NOT raising that issue. If Leyritz blew a 0.14, and the victim was a 0.18, then those are facts that the defense has at their disposal to work with.

      If you or a relative ever gets into a mess, and you hire a lawyer who says “man, you’re screwed……you’re going away for a long time”, let us know his name, so we know who NOT to call for defense if the situation ever arises.

      • Ron

        His lawyer said he was NOT negligent. He was driving DRUNK and he ran a RED LIGHT. I understand his lawyer was hired to represent him and get him the most lenient sentence, but please explain to me how Leyritz was NOT negligent.

        • Chris C.

          I don’t have to explain that to you. His lawyer has to explain it in court.

          If you understand that his lawyer was hired to get him the most lenient sentence, then why are you surprised by the spin he must put on this tragedy to accomplish this?

          What Leyritz’ lawyer is trying to do is this: He’s not trying to totally admonish his client from any fault, although that’s what it may sound like to you. He’s just trying to create enough doubt that it was TOTALLY Leyritz’ fault, in order to achieve a lighter sentence.

          At the end of the day, the lawyer is doing his job.

          • Ron

            “Spin” is one thing. Generally, it is used in the context of putting your position in the most favorable light.

            Flat out lying is quite another, and is generally not regarded as “spin”, except in the political realm, where flat out lying is excepted as the norm, and hence my original comment about his future as a politician.

            The fact that the other driver was also drunk does not absolve Leyritz of his negligence. I am not an attorney nor familiar with Florida law, but I’m pretty sure that driving drunk is a negligent act, as is running a red light, and since his attorney said he is NOT negligent (and took it one step further by blaming the victim), his statement can be considered a lie.

            “At the end of the day, the lawyer is doing his job.” I never said he wasn’t. All I said was with that level of “spin” i.e. a lie, he compares very favorably to a politician.

  • Capital T

    Just out of curiosity, how do they know who ran the red light? If there is video evidence, he is done, if not, its hard to say. Either way, everybody agrees not to drink and drive

  • GG

    They were both at fault. They were both drunk. Just one died as a result of her decisions.

  • pounder

    Jim Leyritz deserves jail time.Jim Leyritz deserves to be made to pay for the victims childrens upbringing.But, Jim Leyritz deserves to have the general population know that he,(and his yankee running mate Mark Leiter),made regular and unpublicized visits to childrens cancer wards in NYC.Doesn’t excuse him him from anything,he deserves what he gets,……..including our prayers for him and the children involved.

  • Kevin K

    Cry me a river. I am supposed to feel bad for Leyritz because he is a former Yankee? I am supposed to give him a 2nd chance b/c of his post season performances? Give me a break. Sorry, there is a limit to my fandom of the Yankees. He had the world as his fingertips and HE decided to give it all away. With the facts I know, he at minimum had an equal hand in kililng the woman if not more. He certainly deserves to do jail time.

    I feel awful for the Leyritz kids. They did not choose to be put in this situation, and now they have to deal with the reality of their father possibly in jail, and their parents are idiots and awful role models.

    All of you Leyritz appologists and the “Yankees can do no wrong” fans, save yourself the energy of typing. You will sound like an idiot trying to justify his actions.

    • Slugger27

      nobody thinks what he did was right, and nobody is justifying it… we just all agree that its a really sad story

      the fact that its someone we used to all root for doesnt make it any less bad, but it at least lets us realize how fast things can go badly in life if u do somethin stupid

    • Chris C.

      Dude, you can feel bad for people, and still believe they’re fully at fault and should do the time.

      There is a human element to it.

      I feel bad for anyone who ends up killing someone when they had no intent to do it. I also feel they must pay for it.
      Were they stupid? Of course. I’ve been stupid too. I was just fortunate enough not to cause anyone to lose their life.