Apr
01

Joba gets probation

By

Joba Chamberlain pleaded guilty to his DUI charge in Nebraska earlier today, and was sentenced to probation of unknown length. As part of a plea bargain, the second charge of driving with an open alchohol container was dropped in exchange for the guilty plea. He’ll meet the team back in New York today, and will probably beat them there.

Update (1:40pm): He got nine months probation.

Categories : Asides

63 Comments»

  1. GG says:

    Great, now the kid can go become an ace.

  2. steve (different one) says:

    i love Joba, but he’s kindof a dumbass.

  3. Glad to hear that legal hurdle is behind him.

    Now, then, how do I work this DUI conviction into my awesomely hilarious narrative where I passively-aggressively suggest that Joba belongs in the bullpen? If you guys have any ideas, I’d love to hear them.

    Sincerely,
    Ken “Sucka got no juice” Rosenthal

  4. Drew says:

    I’m not bashing Joba at all, he made a mistake that is made every day all over the world. It’s thing like this that make me hate A-rod bashers, Joba has gotten minimum publicity for this. Has Alex every threatened the life of another human being like Joba did here? Again, I love Joba but this infraction is more serious than a guy using “boli” to hit a ball or being in a love triangle with his wife and Madonna.

    • ARod brutally raped and murdered baseball history.

      Sincerely,
      Jayson Stark

    • Mike Pop says:

      Blasphemy!!!!

    • steve (different one) says:

      this is the Mets’ starting (more or less) catcher:

      The Marlins released Castro in October 2004 and, in November, he was charged for a rape that allegedly occurred in a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania hotel room on August 28, 2003. On November 29, he pleaded no-contest to reduced misdemeanor indecent assault charges and was sentenced to a year of probation.

      doesn’t make A-Rod any less of a dumbass, but to further your point, A-Rod gets more publicity for screwing a stripper than a guy who took a plea deal on a rape charge…

    • Rich says:

      That’s why Joba ended up in court and A-Rod didn’t. The differential coverage merely shows that waaaay more people know A-Rod’s name.

      • steve (different one) says:

        i don’t think that works for Joba.

        within the New York media market, i think 99.99% of people know who both A-Rod and Joba are.

        this wasn’t Dave Robertson…Joba is a superstar.

        • Zack says:

          You are right that the law rightly treats DUI more strictly. At least theoretically, and that the difference lies in the media. But it doesn’t have anything to do with more people “knowing” A-Rods name. It has everything to do with the fact that the media covers those two players differently. And with the fact that the media goes on witch hunts to take the coverage away from its own failings in the steroids boom.

        • Rich says:

          The A-Rod story is being driven by a dynamic that extends far beyond New York.

          Joba isn’t a superstar yet, while A-Rod’s fame extends far beyond baseball.

          • Memo says:

            “The A-Rod story is being driven by a dynamic that extends far beyond New York.

            Joba isn’t a superstar yet, while A-Rod’s fame extends far beyond baseball.”

            But people in NY know Joba, so why wasn’t the coverage in NY more severe? Or on SI.com or ESPN or FOX Sports?

            • Rich says:

              There was some harsh coverage in the initial aftermath of the DUI. There were several columnists who wrote that he was blowing his career, that he had character issues because he put innocent people at risk, some writers interviewed his mother, who has had substance problems of her own, and wondered whether Joba was or would be an alcoholic too.

              The difference is that the Joba story had a much shorter shelf-life. If he was the highest paid pitcher in baseball who was on a path to having 300 wins (let alone the all-time win record), and the media thought he lied about the underlying facts, the story would have lingered far longer and the coverage would have been far more negative.

              • steve (different one) says:

                fair enough.

                see my point further down.

                i agree with the steroids stuff and the HR record, etc. of course that was a HUGE story.

                it was really the magnitude of the reporting on the stuff like the stripper in Toronto, suntanning, etc. that i was referring to.

                before the steroids crap, it was hard to argue that A-Rod wasn’t held to some other ridiculous standard than almost no other athlete has ever been held to.

              • The difference is that the Joba story had a much shorter shelf-life.

                And rightfully so. Since there was no death or injury to anyone, nor any possible suspension, Joba’s DUI arrest had no real future ramifications for anyone or anything, unless he gets pulled over again in the future.

                The story had no shelf life because there was no story other than the bare-bones facts of the story itself. Once that’s reported, there’s nothing else to say.

        • this wasn’t Dave Robertson…Joba is a superstar.

          Slow down. Joba’s a “superstar”? Let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

          Ramiro Pena, now, THAT GUY is a superstar.

      • Drew says:

        Anyone that watches espn knows who Joba is. A-rod is an international celebrity and Joba isn’t. That has nothing to do with my point.

        • Rich says:

          If A-Rod got the DUI and Joba used boli/Madonna, the differential media coverage would be exactly the same. I believe that is a consequence of their respective levels of fame. Granted, A-Rod is loathed, so maybe if Jeter had used boli/Madonna he would be treated better by the media, but I don’t think the A-Rod hate is the operative factor in the differential coverage in comparison to Joba.

          • Drew says:

            If Joba tested positive for a steroid and dated Madonna he would get minimal publicity? Do you live in the Tri-state area? You can’t be serious.

            • Rich says:

              The coverage Joba got wasn’t minimal, it is only minimal in comparison to A-Rod.

              Part of the reason the Madonna story had legs is that A-Rod’s wife said that she broke up their marriage. Joba, in contrast, isn’t married.

              A-Rod gets maximal coverage for everything he does. Joba could do exactly the same things A-Rod has done and he would receive far less coverage.

              I believe that the operative difference is their level of fame. Does the A-Rod hate play a role? Yes, but when the reference point is Joba, I don’t think the hate is the reason for the differential coverage.

              • Drew says:

                I’d say it has been the definition of minimal. We heard when it first happened, when the yankees made a statement, when the hearing was postponed a second time, and now when he was issued probation, I’d say that’s minimal. Especially in terms of the NY market.

                • Joba was a first time offender with a clean record and no history of drunkenness, violence, or destruction. Nobody was hurt. He didn’t fight with the cops. He apologized and was contrite. He was never in jeopardy of missing any part of the season. There were no human interest angles here. There were no subtext stories. It didn’t even happen in the city, it happened in sleepy Lincoln, NE.

                  Nothing here warranted more than minimal coverage. Even in the NY market.

                • Drew says:

                  I didn’t say it did warrant more coverage. Rich claimed the coverage hasn’t been minimal, I was just disagreeing.

          • If A-Rod got the DUI and Joba used boli/Madonna, the differential media coverage would be exactly the same.

            I like the way you just threw in there the concept of somebody “using” Madonna.

            Well done.

    • radnom says:

      No offense, but Arod cheating is WAY more relevant to baseball then Jobas’ DUI. I’m not going to start complaining that sports media isn’t covering off the field stuff more than steroids.

      Now, replace the failed steroid test with [Madonna, strippers, prostitutes, tanning in central park] (pick one) and I totally agree.

      • Drew says:

        Is a guy taking a steroid more serious than threatening someones life? I wasn’t talking about baseball but more the choices that two fully grown men have made in their life.

        • Drew says:

          BTW, it wasn’t cheating.

        • Is a guy taking a steroid more serious than threatening someones life?

          In the grand, big picture view of the world, no.

          In the world of baseball and newsmedia, yes.

          A professional athlete driving drunk during the offseason is a cautionary tale of criminality. What it isn’t is an exceptionally newsworthy story. His DUI was merely one of hundreds of thousands of alcohol-related, non fatal traffic stops across the country in 2008.

          But, whether or not you think it’s cheating, the best player in baseball getting exposed for taking steroids is a very, very newsworthy event. Joba’s DUI was dangerous and serious but unremarkable. Alex’s steroid scandal was innocuous and irrelevant but highly remarkable.

          • radnom says:


            In the grand, big picture view of the world, no.

            In the world of baseball and newsmedia, yes.

            Exactly, thanks tsjc.
            You also have to look at it from a media perspective…the whole “man bites dog thing”.
            How often do people get arrested drinking and driving?
            All the time.
            How often do celebrities get arrested drinking and driving?
            Still, pretty often.
            How often does the one man predicted to clean up baseballs most sacred record get caught doing the one thing that he was supposedly going to clean up?
            Well, now you’ve got a bit a story.

            And yes, it is cheating. No way to argue otherwise.

            • Drew says:

              Why is it cheating if there was no rule? It was against the law? The world is bigger than the USA. Is it illegal in DR, Mexico, Amsterdam..(fill in other countries here.) If he had a prescription because of a testosterone deficiency would it have been okay? No way to argue otherwise is hardly the truth.

            • And yes, it is cheating. No way to argue otherwise.

              Bullshit. I most certainly can argue it. Not going to reopen that can of worms here again, but I’m also not letting you slip in a bonus free shot uncontested at the end of your otherwise spot-on accurate comment.

            • steve (different one) says:

              yes, i agree with this point about steroids.

              HOWEVER…the coverage around A-Rod was exactly the same BEFORE the steroids thing even started.

              Madonna, tanning in the park, his wife’s shirt, the stripper, etc. all happened BEFORE the steroid shit went down.

              so rewind 2 months: is it fair to ask why Joba’s DUI didn’t get 5% of the publicity of A-Rod banging a stripper? yes, i think so.

              • so rewind 2 months: is it fair to ask why Joba’s DUI didn’t get 5% of the publicity of A-Rod banging a stripper? yes, i think so.

                On that point, yes.

                I think there’s nothing wrong with ARod’s steroid scandal getting more coverage than Joba’s DUI.

                I’ll agree with you, though, that the other 99% of the ARod coverage is ridiculous and should get far, far less attention than Joba’s DUI.

              • radnom says:

                Yeah, if you noticed I said in my original comment that if you replaced ‘steroids’ with any of those stories you just mentioned it would have been a valid point. No argument there.


                Why is it cheating if there was no rule? It was against the law? The world is bigger than the USA.

                Um, lack of testing doesn’t mean there was no rule against it. When he tested positive the rules are exactly the same as they are now (same CBA), only there is testing. Further i’m pretty sure taking substances like that without a prescription has been against MLB for years before that. I honestly don’t care if its against the law or not, I actually don’t even think stuff like that should be illegal.

                I don’t want any worms either tsjc, but I’m genuinely curious how you could argue that its not cheating? I honestly am not aware of the other point of view. (Drew’s incorrect assertions aside)

                • Been said too many times to get into again here.

                  Another day, perhaps. 5 months from now when somebody else gets outed.

                • Drew says:

                  Radnom, the idea that the CBA made it wrong is not the point and probably not true. What did it make wrong? Injecting testosterone? Popping Methyl-1-testosterone pills, of which were perfectly legal over the counter up until an FDA ban of pro-hormones in 2004. I am a weightlifter and have seen many supplements in my time. The term performance enhancer is the dumbest and most open-ended term(not in reference to anything you said just something I’ve never understood in this whole steroid deal). I don’t know what is expressively in the CBA but I’m sure it didn’t say, Don’t take Boli it is against the rules.

          • Drew says:

            Agreed, my whole thing is dealing with the fact that most A-rod “news”(if you can call it that) is not on the baseball field.

            • Okay, and… Joba’s DUI “news” was also not on the baseball field.

              Not sure where you’re going with this…

              • Drew says:

                Going back to my original comment. A-rod is treated as if he is a criminal constantly.(actually worse obviously) His news coverage is almost unprecedented. If he makes an illegal left turn it will be made out like he attempted to run down 7 school children. Joba’s offfield life is only noticed on page five of the post with other gossip columns. I’m not sure where I’m going with this either but I’m just insensed with habitual A-rod bashers.

        • Memo says:

          Everything A-Rod did non-baseball related got more attention than Joba’s DUI in the NY sports media. Not only more attention, because you can relate that to the fame, but more outrage and contempt from the writers and fans.

          But its all personal I guess because I just can’t comprehend. I find DUI reprehensible. Stallworth was charged with DUI manslaughter.

          Anyway, comparison to A-Rod or no comparison I’m a forgiving person but honestly I don’t even look at Joba the same. He’s young, he made a mistake and he may never do it again. He isnt the devil but DUI is something I feel as a society we just don’t take seriously enough. Now I’m ranting.

          • Stallworth is a bad comp for two reasons:

            1) He killed a guy. Joba killed nobody. Joba got drunk in Nebraska and was driving around an empty road surrounded by cornfields (trust me, I’ve been on the very road he was pulled over on, there is literally NOTHING out there.) Stallworth got drunk and was driving around downtown Miami surrounded by pedestrians.

            2) Stallworth plays in the NFL, Joba plays in MLB. Our society holds baseball players to a higher standard than football players for a multitude of reasons. Not saying it’s fair, just pointing that out.

  5. Memo says:

    I know Stallworth killed someone and Joba didn’t. To me it is NOT a bad comparison. Your point is just proof of the mentality that a DUI means nothing as long as no one gets hurt. So lets just get outraged over Joba’s drinking and driving after he kills someone.

    And I know the double standard of football and baseball. But I would disagree that in this instance its slanted towards football. Media is notorious for criticizing NFL players for their off the field activities.

    • Your point is just proof of the mentality that a DUI means nothing as long as no one gets hurt. So lets just get outraged over Joba’s drinking and driving after he kills someone.

      It was a first offense, he has a clean record, and yes, nobody got hurt, so yes, society treats it as a big deal but NO, it’s not a deal big enough to warrant jail time or public excoriation through the media.

      Were the public and the media outraged over Joba’s DUI at first? Yes. Did that outrage subside quickly? Yes. Is it because nobody died or got hurt and Joba made a mistake (and owned up to it) that many, many people make without irrevocably becoming bad, evil people for the rest of their lives? Yes.

      Joba got 9 months probation and had several articles written about him where media bloviators called him a disgraceful punk and the team told him to keep his nose clean from now on. What would have made you happy, the media running stories every day, demanding that he be kicked out of baseball forever? Put him in the stocks and let kids throw rotten tomatoes at him? Cut his feet off so he can never drive a car again?

      • Memo says:

        I’ve stated I consider it worse than some of the other off the field issues people choose to cherry pick as horrible deeds. I don’t recall saying anything about jail or the moronic examples you stated.

      • radnom says:

        Yeah seriously.

        What were they supposed to fill the articles with?

        “Joba: Corns worst nightmare?”

        Who would want to read endless articles about Joba’s drunk driving? There is only so much you could write about this story.

        Remember Memo, mainstream sports media exists to make money. They are not basing what they write about on some golden moral compass.

        • Memo says:

          I know that radnom. Doesn’t mean I can’t acknowledge what they do. Little kids lie doesn’t mean I shouldn’t actively teach mine not to do it.

          I don’t expect articles everyday either. Know what else I don’t expect? A constant reminder of what someone did in past.

          No one was saying Joba should be treated like A-Rod. All some people did was note the different standards and if anything, think A-Rod should be given the same treatment as others. And yes, I know their fame is different.

          There will be no mention of “the drunk driving starting pitcher” in an article that has nothing to do with his DUI. Like there are Madonna references to A-Rod having nothing to do with her.

          Just acknowledging the standards not asking Joba to be treated like garbage.

  6. Johnny says:

    DUI is serious, but people make mistakes, all people. In NY, your second in ten years is a felony, the logic being that the first one should be enough to wake sensible folks up to the reality of the consequences their actions carry. The question here is, will Joba get the message and move on with his life responsibly or will he make mistakes like this in the future. only time will tell.

    • Memo says:

      Agree Johnny. Lets hope he learns. In CA almost 30% of all DUI offenders have multiple convictions. Though it doesn’t mean Joba won’t get it, obviously there are many people who don’t.

    • Drew says:

      I’m sure he’ll be riding in a car service from now on. Then again, if he didn’t learn a lesson it wouldn’t be the first time an athlete lets his fans down and acts like a jack ass.

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