Sep
24

Yanks’ affiliates finish with second best record in the minors

By

The Yankees’ six stateside minor league affiliates combined for a 381-309 record this season, the 18th consecutive season in which they posted an over-.500 record. It might be longer for all I know, but B-Ref’s minor league data only goes back so far. According to Baseball America, that 381-309 record was the second best record among all 30 organizations in the minors, trailing only the absurdly successful Giants’ system, who finished 411-286. Hard to believe the Yanks’ had the second best combined record in all of minor league baseball, but were still 23 games back in the loss column of the top team. Crazy.

Congrats goes out to everyone for the great year in the minors, not just the players but all the coaches and instructors as well.

Categories : Asides, Minors

13 Comments»

  1. wilcymoore says:

    FYI, the Yanks’ minor league teams had an overall 417-281 (.597) regular season record in 2007 and a 406-287 (.586) record in 2008.

    The Yankee minor league squads have been doing especially well on the mound. This year two of the Yanks’ six minor league teams led their leagues in ERA (Staten I. & Scranton), two led their leagues in WHIP (Charleston & Scranton) and all six were in the top half of their league in both ERA and WHIP.

    In ’08 three of the six farm teams led their leagues in ERA, two led their leagues in WHIP. And in ’07 (when Hughes, Chamberlain, and Kennedy were approaching the bigs), three Yankee minor league staffs led their leagues in ERA and three led in WHIP.

    Give Cashman, et al. credit. The Yankee farm system is pretty darn good.

  2. The Artist says:

    Does winning really matter in the minors?

    You could load up your system with MLB retreads and have among the best records, but no real prospects. Yanks used to do that way back in the 80s a lot. I always thought a good system emphasizes player development over team results.

    Some also say having too many 28 year olds is bad for player development, since there’s a reason why they’re 28 and still in the minors. You don’t want good prospects hanging around those guys.

    • wilcymoore says:

      The Yankee minor league teams are not winning because they have older players at the various levels than their competition. Check the minor league rosters and the ages of players.

      As far as the question of whether winning at the minor league level matters, I will give you two answers. First, winning should give some indication of the quality of a team’s prospects. Granted, a team with a few top shelf prospects might not fare well in won-lost record but could be better off in stocking its big league roster. But a poor minor league W-L record probably doesn’t bode well for the future (see, Mets, N.Y.).

      Second, I have to think that winning fosters personal pride and confidence among a team’s prospects. To major league fans it might not matter much who makes the playoffs in, say, the South Atlantic League, but to a 20-year-old kid with dreams of the big time, playing in games that are meaningful to his minor league squad has to be beneficial for his development.

  3. Johan Iz My Brohan says:

    Not that this matters, it does relate to the minors in a way, but did RAB mention anything on the Pirates picking up Anthony Claggett today?

    Hacker, Claggett, Ohlendorf, Karstens, McCutchen, Jackson, Tabata… probably missing some one.

  4. Bo says:

    Winning in the minors actually does matter. Dont you want your players coming up to learn how to win? Its not like they are stocking these teams with journeymen trying to get the best records especially at the lower levels. If you have talent you want them learning how to win.

    • Trapped In El Duque's Glove says:

      If you said you wanted your players to play in high pressure situations to test their mettle then I might be with you, but “learning how to win” is such a ridiculous notion.

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