Oct
23

How were the Yankees assembled?

By

A new addition to my RSS reader is a blog called The Sports PhD. He brings some interesting ideas to the table, and some of them I’ve already riffed on, like the best worst hitters in the playoffs. Today he goes over how the Philadelphia Phillies were assembled. The obvious next step is to see how the Yankees put together their squad. I’ll do it in the same style as Sports PhD.

1B Mark Teixeira Signed as a Free Agent from Angels 2009
2B Robinson Cano Amateur Free Agent 2001
SS Derek Jeter 1st Round Draft Pick 1992
3B Alex Rodriguez Traded by Rangers 2004
RF Nick Swisher Traded by White Sox 2009
CF Melky Cabrera Amateur Free Agent 2001
LF Johnny Damon Signed as a Free Agent from Red Sox 2005
C Jorge Posada 24th Round Draft Pick 1990
DH Hideki Matsui Signed as Free Agent from Japan 2003
SP CC Sabathia Signed as Free Agent from Brewers 2009
SP A.J. Burnett Signed as Free Agent from Blue Jays 2009
SP Andy Pettitte 22nd Round Draft Pick* 1990
SU Phil Hughes 1st Round Draft Pick 2004
CL Mariano Rivera Amateur Free Agent 1990

*Pettitte was a draft and follow, drafted in 1990 but signed in May of 91.

The Phillies assembled their team with 6 through the draft, 1 Rule 5 player, 1 amateur free agent, 4 trades, and 4 free agency signings. I added a few more players for the Yanks comparison, but they added 4 through the amateur draft, 3 through amateur free agency, 2 via trade, 4 through traditional free agency, and 1 by Japanese free agency. That looks like a good breakdown to me. The Yankees had an advantage in Latin America scouting, and it paid off. That’s the biggest difference between them and the Phillies, who had better amateur drafts — partly because they finished worse than the Yanks in most years.

Hopefully, this won’t be the last Yankees/Phillies comparison we see in the coming weeks.

Categories : Analysis

20 Comments»

  1. Isn’t Rodriguez technically a free agent signing because of his opting out?

    /nitpick.

    • No. He was retained as a free agent. He was ACQUIRED via trade with the Rangers.

      /counternitpick’d

      • Here’s the nitpick you CAN do, however:

        SP Andy Pettitte 22nd Round Draft Pick* 1990 Signed as Free Agent from Astros 2007

      • ClayBuchholzLovesLaptops says:

        That’s at least debatable. IIRC, a player filing for free agency is not affiliated with any club and it doesn’t make a difference if he re-signs with his former club. Filing for free agency makes you lose your 10-and-5 rights, for example.

        So, signing A-Rod after the 2007 season would make him signed as a free agent, not acquired via trade. Not that it matters, anyway.

        • So, signing A-Rod after the 2007 season would make him signed as a free agent, not acquired via trade.

          No, it’s both.

          We acquired him via trade. That’s how we got him. Acquire implies the getting or obtaining of something that you had, to that point, previously not had. ARod opting out and re-signing with us is not the acquisition of ARod, it’s the retention of ARod. We didn’t “get” ARod in 2007, we “kept” ARod in 2007. Whether it’s via straight renegotiation or via opt-out and subsequent new contract signing, it’s still not an acquisition. It’s not even a reacquisition, because there was no intervening loss or de-acquisition where he was acquired by another team.

          If we had “lost” ARod to free agency and then “gained” ARod by resigning him, we would have been awarded a free sandwich round pick for losing a Type A, and we would have had to send our first round pick to ourselves.

          ARod was acquired by trade. He was subsequently re-signed following an optout. The re-signing does not nullify the original acquisition as his true acquisition.

          Similarly, Jeter was not “acquired” as a free agent in 2001. He was acquired in the 1992 draft.

          • ClayBuchholzLovesLaptops says:

            It’s not even a reacquisition, because there was no intervening loss or de-acquisition where he was acquired by another team.

            Right, he wasn’t with another team, but he wasn’t affiliated with the Yankees, either. Therefor there had to have been an transaction which brought him back.

            If we had “lost” ARod to free agency and then “gained” ARod by resigning him, we would have been awarded a free sandwich round pick for losing a Type A, and we would have had to send our first round pick to ourselves.

            That’s only because he was a Type A FA. If Jose Molina files for free agency after this season and is re-signed by the Yankees, it would be the same as with A-Rod, but as he is a lousy player, there would be no compensation pick.

            ARod was acquired by trade. He was subsequently re-signed following an optout. The re-signing does not nullify the original acquisition as his true acquisition.

            Sure. The question is: Are we counting the original acquisition or the one that caused to be on the roster right now.

            Similarly, Jeter was not “acquired” as a free agent in 2001. He was acquired in the 1992 draft.

            Jeter was never off the Yankees’ roster, but Bernie Williams in 1998 would fall under that category.

            • Chris C. says:

              “That’s only because he was a Type A FA. If Jose Molina files for free agency after this season and is re-signed by the Yankees, it would be the same as with A-Rod, but as he is a lousy player, there would be no compensation pick.”

              LMAO!!!! No compensation pick?? Hell there’s be no competition to sign him! Or are the Yankees gonna have to toss 28 mill per to secure Jose’s services?
              That is really a weird comparision.

    • A.D. says:

      Than Andy would also technically be a free agent signing.

  2. A.D. says:

    they added 4 through the amateur draft, 3 through amateur free agency…

    Wait, what, they didn’t buy the whole team?

    • Spaceman.Spiff says:

      Unless any of the players are Steinbrenners that aren’t getting paid for their services, the Yankees bought their whole team. Bunch of hired guns.

      /MSM’d

  3. Joe says:

    Can we please stop with the comparison to Phillies? Last time I checked, we’re not playing them in the World Series yet.

    • Mike Axisa says:

      He didn’t compare them to the Phillies. The original post that gave Joe the idea to put this together was about the Phillies, which is why he mentioned it.

      • Joe says:

        “The Phillies assembled their team with 6 through the draft, 1 Rule 5 player, 1 amateur free agent, 4 trades, and 4 free agency signings. I added a few more players for the Yanks comparison, but they added 4 through the amateur draft, 3 through amateur free agency, 2 via trade, 4 through traditional free agency, and 1 by Japanese free agency. That looks like a good breakdown to me. The Yankees had an advantage in Latin America scouting, and it paid off. That’s the biggest difference between them and the Phillies, who had better amateur drafts — partly because they finished worse than the Yanks in most years.

        Hopefully, this won’t be the last Yankees/Phillies comparison we see in the coming weeks.”

        Looks like a comparison to me. Not trying to be a jerk because the post is interesting but I’m getting a little tired of people annointing the Yanks as AL champs when they still have to, ya know, actually win the ALCS. Hopefully the Yanks win game 6 and we can compare away.

    • Chris C. says:

      “That’s the biggest difference between them and the Phillies, who had better amateur drafts — partly because they finished worse than the Yanks in most years.”

      Oh yeah. THAT’S the biggest difference between the Yankees and the Phillies.
      Nevermind that the Yankee infield makes the same as the entire Philly roster. This is not nearly as notible as the Philly slight edge in the Amateur draft department.

  4. Jake H says:

    If you look at the BP it’s pretty impressive how many home grown guys the Yankees have.

    • ClayBuchholzLovesLaptops says:

      That’s right. Everybody but Gaudin and Marte, and even Marte played for the Yankees in the minors but he played with the Mariners before that.

      • Chris C. says:

        Do the Yankees really have that many more homegrown BP guys than the Twins, Angels, Red Sox, Phillies, Dodgers, or most other teams in the league? No.
        Why is that so impressive?

  5. ooda says:

    The point is that Howard, Utley, Rollins, Victorino, Ruiz, Madson, Happ, a lot of stars and the core of the team were home grown Phillies. Werth was aninjured player picked up for nothing. Lee and Lidge were trades. The only “big” free agent signing is Ibanez. The Phils developed their own team, the Yanks (A Rod, Texiera, Sabathia, Burnett, Damon, Matsui) bought theirs. Thats why the whole world outside of NY will be rooting for the Phils.

  6. [...] took a look at how the core of the Yanks’ roster was constructed last week, but John Sickels did a more thorough job over the weekend. Sorry Joe. Sickels also [...]

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