Feb
23

On the importance of a healthy ballclub

By

The Yankees may miss team trainer Gene Monahan, right, more than they realize. (AP Photo/Paul J. Bereswill)

Gene Monahan hasn’t missed a Spring Training since the mid-1960s, and he has served as the Yankee head trainer since 1973. But last week, in news that slipped a bit under the radar, the Yankees announced that Monahan was battling a significant illness and would be missing Spring Training and some of the regular season this year.

“I miss not being around my professional family already, but I’m battling,” Monahan said in a statement. “The New York Yankees have gone above and beyond in this most difficult time. I couldn’t do this alone, but with the support and love of my immediate family, my family within our organization and the dedication and expertise of many fine doctors, I look forward to resuming my role with the team this season.”

Many Yankee fans didn’t know what to make of this news. We all know who Gene Monahan is, but we generally don’t see him unless something is wrong or someone is hurt. We don’t see the work he puts in behind the scenes making sure his players are healthy enough to face the rigors of a 162-game schedule. We don’t see the pre- and post-game stretching or the countless massages, ice packs and heat baths Monahan oversees. We simply see him jog out and fetch someone we don’t want to see getting fetched.

A recent series of posts at Beyond the Box Score, though, can help us understand Monahan’s — and the rest of the team’s medical staff’s — impact on the Yankees. Last week, Jeff Zimmerman explored the percentage of team payroll lost to the DL and found the Yanks to be among the league’s best in this category. Looking at totals from 2002-2009, Zimmerman found that the Yanks lost $175 million of the $1.46 billion they spent over those eight seasons. The 12 percent loss is good for 25th lowest in all of baseball.

In terms of total DL trips, the Yankees fare a bit worse. They’ve sent 57 players to the disabled list and find themselves with 11 teams ahead of them who have seen fewer trips to the DL. The Yanks’ 6,107 DL days are 11th highest in the league. The Yankees, then, appear to be losing their cheaper players to longer disabled list stints and also, Carl Pavano.

To put a win value on these DL numbers, colintj at BTB ran some WAR calculations and determined that DL time can lead to a difference, on average, of seven wins lost to injury between the healthiest team, which loses around 2 WAR per season, and the least healthy team which loses around 9 WAR per season. Over the span of the study, the Yanks have lost 6.49 WAR per 162 games — or 0.45 above the average WAR lost per 162 games — to injury. In other words, the team’s medical staff is great at keeping the high-priced guys on the field but seemingly average at keeping the Yankees healthy overall.

In a sense, health is one area that has seen little study in the age of sabermetrics. Because health can be there one day and gone the next, it’s nearly impossible to predict who will lose time to an injury and for how long this player will be gone. Last year, A-Rod missed far less time than expected due to his own ability to heal while Chien-Ming Wang missed nearly the entire season with various ailments. Now with Monahan out, we’ll be able to see how healthy the Yanks can be without their long-term head trainer. In a division in which every win will be important come the pennant stretch, an X-factor such as this one could very well tip the balance of AL East power.

Categories : Injuries
  • matt

    Many will miss Monohan!

    • Angelo

      I will agree on this matter. In fact, I believe that it is very possible that as Yankee fans, we will witness a new age in team trainers.

      …..
      ……..
      The Monahanless era…?

      Sounds like it will only last at most 2 months. The Yankees will be fine, but it is hard to calculate Gene Monahan’s value to the team.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

      Many will might miss Monohan!

      /alliterate’d

      visit us: http://newyorkstateofsports.spruz.com

      /commentingguidelines’d

  • Bronx Ralphie

    anybody have any insight on what illness Gene has?

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

      Negative. It seems to be a tightly guarded state secret.

  • Derby

    I hope for a full recovery for Monahan. I am sure he has passed on his ways to the trainers underneath him, so we shouldn’t be in too bad of shape. I was just wondering is those stats reflect the players lost to injury, with respect to the WAR. Obviously it would suck a lot more to lose Derek Jeter than say Brett Gardner for the same period of time. I mean look how out of whack we were when arod was out of the lineup last year.

  • http://twitter.com/tafkasic the artist formerly known as (sic)

    Now with Monahan out, we’ll be able to see how healthy the Yanks can be without their long-term head trainer. In a division in which every win will be important come the pennant stretch, an X-factor such as this one could very well tip the balance of AL East power.

    I’m guessing that the Yankees probably have a suitable replacement lined up. They’re not going to have to go all Tim Lincecum (no ice) all of a sudden. Although, they’re free to imitate Lincecum in any other way.

    That’s right, Pawlikowski. I said ANY other way.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada
      • http://twitter.com/tafkasic the artist formerly known as (sic)
        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

          Sure, works for me. It turned Michael Phelps into an Olympic class athlete, after all…

          /causationcorrelation’d

          • Thomas

            Anyone else want to start calling Phelps, the Rosetta Stoner?

        • andrew

          hmmmm…. that’s the first time i’ve seen bongs declared “safe for work.” I wanna know where you work.

    • http://www.riveraveblues.com Joseph Pawlikowski

      What, do you follow me around just to make drug references?

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

        Lisa: He was a jazz musician. You didn’t know him — nobody knew him, but he was a great man, and I won’t rest until all of Springfield knows the name Bleeding Gums Murphy!
        Homer: And I won’t rest until I’ve gotten a hot dog.
        Marge: Homer, this is a cemetery.
        Hot Dog Vendor: Hot dogs! Get your hot dogs here.
        Homer: Woo hoo! [buys one]
        Marge: What do you do, follow my husband around?
        Hot Dog Vendor: Lady, he’s putting my kids through college.

  • A.D.

    Over the span of the study, the Yanks have lost 6.49 WAR — or 0.45 per 162 games — to injury. In other words, the team’s medical staff has managed to keep the Yankees healthy.

    From the looks of that chart they’re middle to bottom 3rd in terms of WAR lost, so that’s not necessarily the best job.

  • The Scout

    Sometimes DL stints can be deceptive. Teams will hide an ineffective player on the DL if he cannot be sent to the minors. Instead, the player developes an undefined “upper body injury” or a severely infected toenail.

    • ColoYank

      Ah yes, that rampant fever known as “ineffective-itis.”

      • JGS

        in pitchers (and this usually affects pitchers), I prefer “inflammation of the ERA”

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

          Severely hyperextended WHIP.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

        Diasuke Matsuzaka’s Disease.

    • http://www.secondavenuesagas.com Benjamin Kabak

      Can you name an instance of that happening beyond Rule 5 situations? The team has to file paperwork with the league showing an injury or some sort. It’s not as a common a happening as DL conspiracy theorists might think.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

        I could tell you… but then I’d have to kill you.

      • Ed

        Sure, here’s one. Rich Aurila,

        I have no idea why he admitted he got put on the DL because he sucked. I would think that he would be better off pretending he really was hurt and using that to explain the poor performance.

      • Rose

        “Fatigue” can be used as an acceptable DL placement issue. There are ways to get around it.

        • A.D.

          So can anxiety.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

            The only anxiety DL stint that seems borderline fraudulent to me in retrospect is Dontrelle Willis’s.

            Greinke, Greene, everyone else who’s been on the DL for an anxiety disorder actually has a medically diagnosed legitimate clinical anxiety disorder, IIRC.

            • A.D.

              I have no problem with players going on the DL for anxiety, just was adding that it can be used, and is something that is easier to fraud than a pulled hamstring, regardless if it’s actually been fraud-ed.

      • Zack

        Dontrelle Willis?
        (Not making anxiety a small issue, but wasnt there a lot of ‘WTFs’ when that came out from ‘anonymous baseball people’?)

  • Rose

    Remember one of those trainers we had a few years ago? Almost everybody on the team pulled a hamstring or twisted an ankle or something within the first few months of the season. Hopefully they do a little more research when finding an acting head trainer.

    • A.D.

      That was the strength & conditioning coach vs the AT

    • Zack

      “Almost everyone” = Matsui, Mussina, Wang, Damon, Pettitte and Hughes

      http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05.....38;emc=rss

      I’m not sure you can blame a coach when older players get hurt (Damon, Matsui, Mussina, Pettitte). And Hughes had a no hitter going, but when his hamstring popped that was the coach’s fault?

      • Ed

        You can write off any of them individually with no problem. However, 5 guys coming down with the same injury is a lot for an entire season, let alone for the first two months or so.

        They brought in a new conditioning coach who had a very different approach from how things used to be done. Correlation does not imply causation and all, but, the guy didn’t have a baseball background, he drastically reduced the amount of running the players did in spring training and changed the exercises they did do. It’s really damn likely that he was the cause of the problems.

        • Zack

          It wasnt the same injury.

          Pettite had bad issue. Damon had calf issue. The other 4 had hamstring yes, but Hughes was having a no hitter for 8 innings, then his hamstring went- that’s the coach’s fault or just a fluke accident?

  • Chris

    Over the span of the study, the Yanks have lost 6.49 WAR — or 0.45 per 162 games — to injury. In other words, the team’s medical staff has managed to keep the Yankees healthy.

    Actually, I think it’s showing the Yankees lost 6.49 WAR per 162 games over that time span. That comes out to be .45 WAR lost per 162 games more than the average team.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Archimedes Torquemada

      That makes more sense. Only losing half a win to injury per year seemed way too small, IMO.

    • http://www.secondavenuesagas.com Benjamin Kabak

      I updated that before you posted this comment. Check again.