Mar
15

Yankees offered Hechevarria $8.5M

By

Via Jon Heyman, the Yankees offered Cuban shortstop Adeiny Hechevarria an $8.5M contract, but he instead took $10M from the Blue Jays. We don’t know how that money would have been distributed – how big was the signing bonus, what was the year-to-year breakdown, etc. – but the largest signing bonus the Yankees have ever given to a young prospect (meaning Hideki Irabu and Jose Contreras don’t count) was the $3.35M they gave Andrew Brackman two-plus years ago. The Red Sox gave Jose Iglesias a $6M bonus, and I’d have to think Hechevarria would have cleared that.

You can always tell how much a team likes a player by how much they’re willing to pay him, and clearly the Yanks’ had a ton of interest in the rail-thin Hechevarria. Can’t blame them for not trying, that’s a tremendous offer.

Categories : Asides

37 Comments»

  1. a part of me really wants to see baltimore and toronto be competitive s o i hope this kid turns out to be pretty good.

  2. Steve H says:

    Can’t blame them for trying. Their interest was (very) sincere and they made a great offer. From the sounds of it, even had they matched the Jays’ (who are killing baseball by throwing money around) offer, it sounds like he preferred the Jays due to PT concerns.

    • ISWYC

      this new acronym tag is just wonderful

    • Tom Zig says:

      I don’t know why playing time was a concern, surely he doesn’t expect to be MLB ready THAT soon.

      • A.D. says:

        probably the public reason when he just wanted the extra 1.5M

      • Steve H says:

        Agreed, I’m not sure if it was a concern, or if it’s being sold that way. Maybe he hears that Jeter wants to play 5 more years, assumes it’s at SS, and turns away from the Yankees.

      • whozat says:

        He doesn’t expect to be MLB ready in the next 4 years? I’d imagine he certainly does.

      • Didn’t we (all of us) go over this in the last Hechy thread?
        I thought we more or less agreed that he chased the cash as per usual for free agents, and that the other stuff was likely 90% for Public Consumption and 10% possibly true?

      • He’s probably going to start in AA New Hampshire. He’ll probably spend 2010 in the minors and grab a coffee in 2011. From there, it’s possible he’d stick on the roster, and assuming he pans out, should be the starting SS in 2012.

        Jeter is likely signing a 4-5 year (though I wish it were 3) deal, and I’d expect him to stay there for at least three of those years.

        Signing with Toronto gave him more money, a better chance to claim a starting job quicker and far less pressure and uncertainty. In his shoes, would you have signed with the Yankees.

        Even if the deals were the exact same in terms of dollars and years, I’d probably wear a Blue Jays cap. Better all-around deal.

  3. I’ll admit that I’m disappointed the Yanks weren’t able to sign Hechevarria. However, I’m also trying to confront my confusion on how much a very raw, underweight kid who’s faced questionable competition should get.

    On the one hand, $10 million over four years could turn out to be a very good deal for the Jays. He’ll probably start in AA and finish in AAA for 2010. So you’re essentially committing $10 million for 3 years, or, a little over $3.3 million per year.

    If he busts out in 2011, hits the Show, and struggles offensively but is able to play GG-caliber defense, you’d have to think that’s worth say, $5 million alone in terms of production. Chances are he improves over the next two years and he’s well eclipsed the total salary he’s been paid.

    On the other hand, $10 million is Scrooge McDuck-type money for a raw prospect. It would seem that $10 million hinges on his bat; his defense should play. If he can’t hit the ball in the big leagues, you may have found an ace defender, but for that type of money, there’s a solid chance you could have found 9 guys who could do better.

    Ultimately, I think it’s worth having done $10 million, provided there’s confidence he can hit. Otherwise, it’s a big, big gamble. But kudos to Toronto. AA knows the key to competing with the bigs in the AL East is to stockpile talent. Good step in the right direction.

    Now I’m just hoping for Matias and Rafael DePaula.

  4. Paul says:

    Mike,

    The only team handing out contract that is killing baseball are the Yankees (i.e. Burnett, Sabathia, etc). Try being a Jays fan and watching NY throw their money around year after year without any fiscal control. Then people like you get upset when the have not’s try to compete by making a bold move. There will come a day when a hard cap is instituted (be it in 5 years or 25 years it’s coming) and when it does I can’t wait to see how well the likes of NY and Boston do. And for those of you who are Boston fans who say Boston drafts well remember it’s mostly because they pay the biggest bonuses – with some exceptions it’s money talks.

    • Mike Pop says:

      Mike really isn’t bitching here.

    • bexarama says:

      You might be on the wrong site.

    • AndrewYF says:

      SteveH’s joke

      ———–

      lots of room

      ———–

      Your head

    • Januz says:

      The Yankees went out and signed guys they believed could bring them a Championship, not unproven players. I noted last might that Hechevarria offered a totally lame excuse (Not wanting to compere with Jeter), for not signing with the Yankees. Joel Sherman proved this statement correct, and all it came down to an extra $1.5m that Toronto gave him.

    • 1) Mike hasn’t complained at all. In fact, knowing Mike, I bet he thinks it was a good move for the Jays.

      2) I know it’s fun to have a crusade and all (I’ve been on the whole why-are-tv-commercials-so-loud?! kick for years now), but you’re off base here. To start, the Yankees are generally middle-of-the-pack in terms of spending in draft bonuses and IFA. Seriously. Look at the numbers. I’m guessing they keep their figures fairly tame as to not give any more ammunition to a looming CBA that may negatively impact the organization. Yes, their team salaries are high. No argument there. But it’s a combination of a few factors. One, they have their own network. 2) Internationally marketable, successful organization. 3) Largest metropolitan area in population in the U.S. Not all markets are large enough to spend $100 million on payrolls. But make no mistake—all are large enough to spend $50 million and spend on development to even the payroll disparity in terms of production. The Yankees also take their profits and put them back into the team. They’re willing to spend a tremendous amount in revenue sharing, and by virtue of them being The Yankees, they greatly increase the viability of MLB as a whole. A weak Yankees, Red Sox, Cubs, Dodgers doesn’t help baseball.

      Boston also drafts well because they regularly spot good talent and they spend on it. They’re not spending $20 million on their drafts.

      Also, the Jays are not some middling poor kid handing out newspapers on the streets for a pittance. The Rogers corporation is huge. The Jays aren’t a victim of payroll—they’ve been a victim of terrible contracts (see Wells, Vernon; Rios, Alex), a woeful stadium, a lack of money spent on development, poor record of draft picks. In short, they can compete if they spend properly.

      3) A hard cap in baseball would be a logistic nightmare. First, the Player’s Union doesn’t want it. Second, an international draft would kill development and lessen talent levels (see Puerto Rico). The international community doesn’t want it. The most marketable teams don’t want it. The teams that do are the billionaires and corporations more interested in larger revenue streams that they won’t have to put back into the team. There must be a hard cap and a floor if that’s the idea. Even then, it’s tricky. How does that work into networks, ticket prices? The NFL can survive on that model because they play once a week, have non-guaranteed contracts, and different tv contracts. It’s a very different sport than baseball.

      • You know that TV commercials aren’t really louder, right? It’s the compression…
        (ducks, wheels, and sprints from room)

      • CS Yankee says:

        True that!

        The revenue sharing has been so good to the lessers that even Obama (Bud) and Pelosi (Fehr & Co) aren’t complaining.

        Sounds like our Yanks FO gave a good offer but didn’t get Kei-kazi’ed or Dice-krazy on their offer. Win some-win some more-lose one.

        Cash & Co are maybe playing Gene Michaels (or above) good.

    • rbizzler says:

      Is that Paul, as in John ‘Paul’ Ricciardi?

      Also, Steve H was being sarcastic in that a trusted meme (ie one that you parroted in your response) is that the Yankees are ruining baseball while other teams throw stupid money at guys like Chapman, Iglesias, etc. are just trying to compete.

    • Raj says:

      That’s why the Jays gave Vernon Wells one of the most ridiculous contract’s in baseball and still can’t get rid of it. The Yanks do have big contracts but they are big players. You aren’t going to get CC for less than Johaan Santana (who set the market) so why are you bitchin’ about it?

  5. Hughesus Christo says:

    The BJs seem to have figured it out. If you want to compete with the Yankees and Red Sox, you do it with your system. Too bad they were the last AL East team to do it.

    • Ted Nelson says:

      The money does tell you how much they liked him: enough to make a big offer, but not enough to actually get him signed… I believe that $1.5 mill or more (to overcome any PT concerns, rational or not) would not have stood in the way if the Yankees really wanted the kid.

      I find these huge contracts going to raw prospects people have barely seen play ridiculous, but we’ll have to see. Obviously some people within the Jays and Reds and Red Sox organizations disagree with me.

  6. daneptizl says:

    Iglesias got over 8 million.

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