An eye toward the future while retaining the present

Yanks win, but don't hit much, in interleague
The deep connections between Cliff Lee and CC

Earlier today, Brian Cashman and Randy Levine, center, helped lead the groundbreaking ceremony for Heritage Field. Last night, the two spoke about the Yanks’ organization. (Photo courtesy of the Yankees)

As the Yankee farm system plays host to numerous young stars, the team believes Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera will be back in the Bronx next year. That’s the message team president Randy Levine and general manager Brian Cashman delivered at a Times Talk last night.

Speaking to a packed house of fans and reporters, Cashman and Levine expounded on the past, present and future of the Yankees as Times reporter Michael S. Schmidt and later the audience bombarded the two team officials with questions. Levine, though, generated the biggest reaction when he issued his statement on Jeter’s and Rivera’s futures. “We don’t negotiate in public, but I would find it highly, highly unlikely if both of them were not back with the Yankees,” he said. “”Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera are the Yankees.”

Cashman, meanwhile, refused to comment as directly on the situation. He declined to respond to an audience member who asked about how A-Rod‘s deal could impact Jeter, and although he said that Jeter “still feels confident” at short and is viewed by the team as a short stop, he chose instead to highlight the team’s minor league stars. The GM spoke glowingly of Jesus Montero, Slade Heathcott, Austin Romine, the newly resurgent Dellin Betances and Andrew Brackman as the crown jewels of the system.

The talent, said the GM, stems from the recognition in the mid-2000s that the team just couldn’t spend away its problems. In 2005, the Yanks began to invest in the draft, but Cashman recognized the limitations of that strategy. “I hope,” he said, “we never pick in the top ten of the draft.”

Young and old were the themes throughout the talk, and as Cashman discussed a decade bookended by World Series Championships, he wistfully spoke of a future many of us would prefer to ignore. One day, Mariano Rivera, the Yanks’ “Energizer bunny,” will hang it up. “It’s going to be hell replacing him. He has been the most meaningful Yankee during this stretch,” Cashman said.

With this public approach, Cashman and Levine are playing an interesting game with the near-term future of the organization. As Jeter’s and, to a lesser extent, Mariano’s free agencies loom, all parties have been mum, but the Yanks have quietly and not-so-quietly expressed the belief that they will “take care” of their superstars. As I wrote last September, this statement creates a conundrum. Even as the team says it isn’t negotiating publicly, it has handed significant leverage to a short stop suffering through one of the worst first halves of his career. That four-year, $100-million deal many think may be coming to Jeter after the season ends strikes me as a bad investment.

Still, the Yankee brass have a clear plan. They might be willing to pay for nostalgia, but they know that the future rests with the younger players. As Randy Levine reiterated the team’s approach toward reinvesting revenue in the on-field product, it seemed clear that club officials are eying another decade or two of Yankee dominance.

Beyond the talk of the future, the discussion hit on the issues a Yankee fan would assume they would. After the jump, a rundown.

On Kei Igawa: An audience member asked Cashman if Kei Igawa would have another crack at the Majors, and the GM hedged his bets. He noted that Igawa “wants to be” a Major League pitcher and then spoke at length about the team’s new conservative approach toward Japanese scouting. “There are huge adjustments for players from Japan to U.S.” Cashman said, noting that pitchers, in particular, are susceptible to the changes in the game.

On those who want to be Yankees: In discussing the renewed focus on the draft, Cashman explained how not every free agent who wants to be a Yankee can be. Carlos Delgado wanted to sign with the Yanks prior to 2005, but the team already had Jason Giambi. Delgado went on to play with the Marlins and Mets where he hit 137 home runs with an OPS+ of 130 before injuries forced him out of the game. I always wanted Delgado as a 1B/DH platoon, but the Yanks were locked into Giambi’s deal.

On relief pitcher use: As the Yankees have tried to fashion a relief corps out of various pitchers, I’ve always wondered why the team isn’t more willing to use its best reliever in a high leverage situation. Sometimes, that’s the 7th inning with a threat brewing; sometimes, that’s the 9th. Cashman told an audience member that the team prefers using Mariano as a 9th inning closer because some hurlers can’t withstand the heat of the final three outs. “Stats don’t show that pressure,” he said.

On baseball as a business: Throughout the talk, both Cashman and Levine repeated the fact that baseball is a business. The Yanks don’t mind the empty Legends Suite seats because those customers are inside conducting business. Everything sells, and the Yankees, said Levine, have evolved to become an “entertainment and sports company around a baseball team.” It’s the logical progression of the game even if it robs baseball of its purity as the so-called national pastime.

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Yanks win, but don't hit much, in interleague
The deep connections between Cliff Lee and CC
  • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

    Cashman told an audience member that the team prefers using Mariano as a 9th inning closer because some hurlers can’t withstand the heat of the final three outs. “Stats don’t show that pressure,” he said.

    But couldn’t it be argued that the ninth inning could have significantly less pressure than the earlier inning(s) when the game needed to be saved?

    • http://twitter.com/BrienJackson Brien Jackson

      Right. What has more pressure, getting 3 outs in the 9th inning with a 3 run lead, or coming in with a one run lead in the 7th, one out, and 2 runners on?

      If teams think that pitchers pitch better and managers manage better when relievers have defined roles, I wish they’d just say that, instead of insulting peoples’ intelligence by pretending the 9th inning makes it inherently more difficult to get outs. Especially since they obviously don’t believe it, given that closer use in the 9th drops off when you have a 4 run lead, as opposed to a 3 run lead.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Fun Fact: Half of the top 6 relievers in Win Probability Added this year are setup men (Daniel Bard, Arthur Rhodes, Luke Gregerson).

        • The Evil Umpire

          Arthur Rhodes is still in the league?? Dude’s gotta be pushing 60 by now!

          • Pete

            It’s got to be tough for him to focus on pitching, when you know, what with that name and all, that he just wants to go home, sit in an armchair next to the fire, and start reading chomski

      • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

        given that closer use in the 9th drops off when you have a 4 run lead, as opposed to a 3 run lead.

        Unless you’re Joe Torre.

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder
      • http://www.lessthismorethat.com/author/ddarrell Jamal G.

        If teams think that pitchers pitch better and managers manage better when relievers have defined roles, I wish they’d just say that, instead of insulting peoples’ intelligence by pretending the 9th inning makes it inherently more difficult to get outs.

        Why can’t it be both?

        Especially since they obviously don’t believe it, given that closer use in the 9th drops off when you have a 4 run lead, as opposed to a 3 run lead.

        Might you be taking “the 9th inning” too literally? Seemingly, they are referring to save situations.

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

          If I had a baseball time machine, I’d go back in time and eliminate both the Win/Loss and the Save statistics. They’re dumb.

          • Gardnerella

            Are they really dumb?

            I do agree that there’s a problem w/older people who just openly dismiss all the new stats — but I think there are also a ton of people using better stats that just completely misuse them.

            I’m smart enough to know that Hoffman isn’t better than Mo because he has more saves. But ‘saves’ paints one color re: his career, other stats flesh it out more.

            I think both sides are more valuable when you compare each w/the other…

            • Joe West’s Music Career

              Yes, Saves are in fact dumb.

              In the 30-3 game, a save was credited. There is no reasonable way to justify this.

        • http://twitter.com/BrienJackson Brien Jackson

          Maybe they are, but that’s not what they’re saying.

      • Roy

        Remember that when a game has a one-run lead, Yankee managers have turned to Mariano in the 8th inning, only subject to his long term durability.

      • Rex Manning Day

        Whether the pressure is “artificial” or not, it’s there. Clearly, from a statistical perspective, earlier higher leverage situations are more important, and therefore should have more “pressure”, than later situations. But if the players perceive more pressure in the 9th, then that’s what matters.

        Changing the perception that the 9th is a bigger, higher pressure situation is going to take quite time. And while it will eventually require some manager to just take the plunge to get that cultural change moving, in the meantime that manager will be taking an unreal amount of criticism.

        Because until that cultural change is effected, the 9th will remain a weird pressure cooker. Let’s say Joba comes in in the 7th with a 3-run lead and two runners on, gets an out or two, but then gives up a double that scores 2 runs. Now it’s a 1-run lead, and the tying run is in scoring position. So, statistically, you should probably bring Mo in. He comes in, cleans up, game saved (for now). Maybe he pitches the 8th, too, but probably not the 9th (ok, Mo could probably go 2, but maybe he has a long 8th–you get the point). And now it’s a one-run game, in the 9th inning, and your two best relievers are out of the picture.

        Now, statistically, using Mo in that situation is still best. And eventually, with the “unnatural” pressure off the 9th, whoever comes in will be able to treat it like just another inning. But in the meantime, whoever comes in is going to have that extra bit of pressure. And that pressure will be justified, because if he loses the game in the 9th, it’ll almost certainly garner more attention than if Joba gave up the lead in the 7th.

        If Joba gives up a lead in the 7th, and Mo is never needed, it’s easy to say “Oh, should have used Mo in that higher leverage situation”. But if Mo saves the 7th, and someone else loses it in the 9th, then what’s gained? Sure, statistically we know that, odds are, those 9th inning losses will be less likely than the 7th inning implosion that was prevented, so it’s a wise trade-off. But when those 9th inning losses do happen (and they will), a world of hurt is going to come down on that manager.

        Hopefully saves will begin to be ignored, and people will put more attention on high-leverage situations than on the 9th for the 9th’s sake, and some manager will start experimenting with this stuff, and everything will be better. But NY already magnifies every criticism, and it’s probably not the best place to experiment with this stuff.

    • A.D.

      Yeah leverage should be leverage. One thing that is non-statistical that even though it doesn’t make sense there are some players which seemingly have a stigma of it being harder to get the final 3 outs, even if there might actually be less leverage then the 7th or 8th. We’ve certainly seen this in comments from Phil Coke before, and there are others. Even though it isn’t logical, may still be the case.

      • http://twitter.com/BrienJackson Brien Jackson

        Sure, it’s just not inherent. And if you’ve got 11 head cases that flip out about 3 outs, and only one dependable guy, you probably need to get a new GM.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        And how much of it is just rationalization? The final three outs in the ninth inning are more pressure packed than the last out of the seventh inning because we’ve told ourselves that the final three outs are more pressure packed?

        We invented the closer, then invented a stat for the closer, then built the game around the importance of the closer and his stat, and now we’re trapped into thinking that the job the closer does is more important and more pressure packed than the job the middle reliever does.

        The pressure is an unnatural creation.

        • Ed

          To some extent you’re right, but not completely.

          If you let the other team take the lead in the bottom of the 7th, it’s easy to write it off and say we’ve got 2 chances to get it back. If it happens in the 9th inning, the game is over. Hence there’s more significance to the 9th, and therefore more pressure. The top of the 9th would have a little less pressure than the bottom half, a little less in the 8th, etc.

          Another factor – if you blow a lead in the 7th, you’ve got at least 6 outs remaining. Unless you’ve got a terrible lineup, you should be getting some good hitters up before the end of the game, so it helps feel you’ve got a shot. If you’re pitching the top of the 9th, you know your team only gets 3 more hitters if you blow it, and they may be the bottom of the lineup, which isn’t going to ease your mind any.

        • Chris

          The pressure is an unnatural creation.

          It may be, but it’s still there. These are people playing the game after all. I tend to feel that pitchers will eventually work through those issues, but that may not always be the case. Just look at someone like Chuck Knoblach, who just seemed to lose the ability to throw the ball to first.

          • http://twitter.com/BrienJackson Brien Jackson

            But that just goes back to the point I made earlier; if you’ve got 12 relievers and 11 of them can’t handle the “pressure” of getting 3 outs with a 3 run lead, that needs to reflect on the guy who put that bullpen together. There’s no reason you can’t get one or two relievers, at least, perfectly capable of holding onto 2 or 3 run leads in the 9th in the event that the closer has to be used to get out of a tighter spot earlier…or even just needs a day off.

            • Chris

              I view this sort of in the same way as pitch counts and innings limits for young pitchers. There are certainly some that can handle the added pressure of the 9th inning (maybe even most), just like there are some that can handle higher innings limits and pitch counts. The problem then becomes, how do you distinguish between those that can and those that can’t? If you try everyone in a high pressure situation, you’re going to end up with more ‘closers’ but you’ll also get more Rick Ankiels. The alternative is to select just one closer and have the rest of your relievers be set up men.

        • A.D.

          Could be, I wouldn’t be surprised if it was media manufactured stress.

        • Gardnerella

          Everything about baseball is an unnatural creation…it’s a game, right?

    • Ed

      Sure, that’s the stat based argument.

      Cashman’s commenting that there’s also a mental aspect to it. Players feel pressure in the 9th inning that isn’t warranted based on statistics. When Phil Coke got his first save last year, his take was “It just seemed like everything was way more amplified.”

      I think part of it is if you screw up in the 7th or 8th inning, it doesn’t feel as bad because you know there’s still more game to be played, so your team can make it up. If you screw up in the 9th, especially the bottom half, it feels more significant as there’s little or no chance of recovering.

      I’d imagine part of it is also the glorification of the 9th inning due to the tracking of saves, but even without that I think there’d still be a significant mental effect.

      • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

        When Phil Coke got his first save last year, his take was “It just seemed like everything was way more amplified.”

        Couldn’t that just be rationalization, though? The situation got more amplified because Coke walked two batters and threw a wild pitch. I doubt he struggled because the ninth inning had some magical hold over him, but rather he struggled because, sometimes relievers struggle. I’m probably overstepping my bounds here, but it’s a lot easier for a guy to say “Well, the ninth inning is tough!” than it is for a guy to say “I didn’t have my best stuff out there tonight and didn’t pitch too well.”

        but even without that I think there’d still be a significant mental effect.

        If the game was on the line, sure. But if you’ve got a three run lead to start the ninth, chances are you’re not going to blow that lead unless you pitch really poorly. Even for a closer, there isn’t much pressure in that situation.

        • Ed

          Couldn’t that just be rationalization, though? The situation got more amplified because Coke walked two batters and threw a wild pitch. I doubt he struggled because the ninth inning had some magical hold over him, but rather he struggled because, sometimes relievers struggle.

          It’s certainly possible it’s just a rationalization. However, he also commented that he started feeling the pressure as soon as he was informed that he was going to pitch the 9th. To me, it seems like the 9th inning legitimately messed with his head, whether it should have or not.

          If the game was on the line, sure. But if you’ve got a three run lead to start the ninth, chances are you’re not going to blow that lead unless you pitch really poorly. Even for a closer, there isn’t much pressure in that situation.

          Agreed.

      • Mike HC

        I should have read your comment first. I agree with you

    • Mike HC

      It is perceived pressure. A reliever that comes in during the seventh inning knows there is more game to play. If he gives up a run or two, the team can get it back.

      In the ninth, if you give the game up, its over (usually). The last memory of the game is you blowing it. Your team has done everything for 8 innings and you singlehandedly blew it for them. It can be mentally debilitating and have a lasting effect on future performance. In other words, you turn into a head case.

      I do thing the stigma of being the final guy between victory and defeat, even if earlier innings were higher leverage, does have added pressure.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        In the ninth, if you give the game up, its over (usually). The last memory of the game is you blowing it. Your team has done everything for 8 innings and you singlehandedly blew it for them. It can be mentally debilitating and have a lasting effect on future performance. In other words, you turn into a head case.

        Yeah, but you can say all the exact same things about a pressure packed 7th inning. When Boone Logan or Chan Ho Park comes in and turns a tight game into a laugher, they’ve blown it for the rest of the team and they’ve turned into a headcase.

        • Mike HC

          There is plenty of pressure in every high leverage situation, and to be honest, in every Professional inning regardless of situation. It just comes down to degree. I personally believe there is more pressure in being the final guy between victory and defeat. And the stigma of blowing it in the ninth, compared to the 7th, is greater.

          Similar to games in June compared to September. A win is a win, but there is seemingly more pressure the closer you get to the end.

  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

    The GM spoke glowingly of Jesus Montero, Slade Heathcott, Austin Romine and the newly resurgent Dellin Betances as the crown jewels of the system.

    Somewhere in New Jersey, Andy Brackmeezy sheds a single tear.

    • http://www.secondavenuesagas.com Benjamin Kabak

      I missed the phrase “among others.” I think they’re pleased with Brackman too. Don’t worry.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Tommie: very aroused.

    • http://www.progressamericana.com/ Pablo Zevallos

      A blog run by a friend (check it out!) says that he included Brackman and labeled them “can’t-miss”

      http://heresthepitch.wordpress.....nd-levine/

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Thanks.

        Cashman seems to think Jesus Montero, Austin Romine, Andrew Brackman, Dellin Betances, and Slade Heathcott are all high-ceiling “can’t-miss” talents.

        Hopefully, all that equals “untouchable”.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Also from the article:

        Cashman said his approach at the trade deadline is to work on the bench, but that he feels confident with the position players, the bullpen, and especially the rotation (sorry, Cliff Lee fans).

        Tommie: very very aroused.

    • Rick

      He spoke about Brackman as well. He actually mentioned them with those 4, just wasn’t typed into the recap. He mentioned Brackman several times actually and said he’s finally healthy.

  • ledavidisrael

    That four-year, $100-million deal many think may be coming to Jeter after the season ends strikes me as a bad investment.

    UNLESS they see Jeter as a special players who the budget doesn’t apply to. Then I’m cool with throwing alot of loot at him.

    • http://twitter.com/dpatrickg Dirty Pena

      How can the budget not apply to someone? We have another team sign him and agree to let him play for us?

      • Pete

        I think what he’s alluding to is the fact that Jeter’s financial value comes from more than his on-field performance. Most mainstream media outlets are essentially walking shrines to Derek Jeter, which essentially equates to them being direct advertisements for the team.

        That said, I would not be a fan of a deal like this. I could see Jeter bringing the Yankees more than $100 million in revenue over the course of 4 years, but I think it’d be very unwise for the team to broach the barrier between on-field value-based contracts and net value-based contracts. The problem is that there is not a ton of hard evidence for either side to use during those negotiations, which means that other players/agents could try to get in on that as well. This could lead to an eventual destabilization of the market, which could lead to inflated FA prices, which could lead to drastic restructuring from MLB that would compromise the Yankees.

        • Gardnerella

          Jeter will end up a contract that’s way over his value on the field (if that’s what he wants) — and it won’t cause inflated FA prices, drastic restructuring or anything else across MLB or even the yanks.

          He’s in a completely unique position vs. just about any other FA in baseball/sports in general ever: he’s the facer of the top sports franchise in the country (world?) — not now, but for decades to come..

          they’re not paying for him to play SS for a few yrs, then eventually DH or whatever. They’re paying for him to take over as Yogi, as an all-time Yankee.

          I’m not saying I agree with any of that or it’s warranted, but that’s the reality of it.

          • Gardnerella

            or “face”

          • Guest

            All kinds of this.

        • Ed

          I think it’d be very unwise for the team to broach the barrier between on-field value-based contracts and net value-based contracts.

          Too late. A-Rod’s performance bonuses in his current contract aren’t actually based on his home run totals, but rather based on his participation in the team’s marketing promotions when those events occur. Things like participating in advertising campaigns and selling signed memorabilia. It’s happened elsewhere in other ways as well. Griffey’s 2009 (and maybe 2010?) Seattle contracts had bonuses based on team ticket sales. Clemens had similar with the Astros. I doubt those are the only ones, but just the ones I remember.

          The problem is that there is not a ton of hard evidence for either side to use during those negotiations

          There is a ton of evidence. It’s just not available to people like us. I’m sure Jeter’s agent, the Yankees management, and MLB all have a very good idea of where that stands. A business with a 9-10 digit net worth definitely has done tons of research into the value of its assets.

          which means that other players/agents could try to get in on that as well

          Let them try. Most players have little difference in their off field value. Ichiro’s possibly the only other big exception, and his contract reflects it.

          You could also argue it applies to some extent in cases like Mauer’s extension, with it being so out of character for the Twins.

          This could lead to an eventual destabilization of the market, which could lead to inflated FA prices, which could lead to drastic restructuring from MLB that would compromise the Yankees.

          It’s just another factor that’s already in the picture. It’s part of why star free agents get as much of a premium as they do. The Nats offered Tex more money than the Yankees did because they felt signing a star player who grew up nearby would spark the fanbase. The Mets overpaid for Pedro Martinez because they felt they needed to make a big splash to get the fans excited again. It’s all the same thing.

          • First of the Mo-hicans

            I don’t mean to quibble, as I see the logic in your post, but MLB teams cannot give incentives based on qualitative statistics, such as number of HR’s, RBI’s, etc. That is prohibited by the collective bargaining agreement. They can give bonuses based upon plate appearances, innings pitched and things of that nature.

  • http://www.puristbleedspinstripes.com Rebecca-Optimist Prime (Optimovelist Primus)

    “The GM spoke glowingly of Jesus Montero, Slade Heathcott, Austin Romine and the newly resurgent Dellin Betances as the crown jewels of the system.”

    Gary says hello.

    • http://soxandpinstripes.net Angelo

      Speaking of Gary Sanchez, guess what!?!!

      He hit another homerun today.

      Call him up to the majors! He’s ready for the show

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Call him up to the majors! He’s ready for the show

        That’s what I just said about Mike Trout.

        Sincerely,
        Keith Law

      • Tampa Yankee

        I went to MiLB to check the score and they had this video up of Jesus’s HR on 6/27… it looks like he didn’t even swing!

        http://web.minorleaguebaseball.....#038;_mp=1 (safe and sorry about the long url, I dont know how to do the tinyurl thing).

        • Chris

          Just go to:

          http://tinyurl.com/

          It’s pretty self explanatory once you’re there.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            http://bit.ly

            Even shorter, and if you sign up for an account, it tracks the clickthroughs from the URLs you create.

            #twittertip’d

        • First of the Mo-hicans

          Thanks for the video. I haven’t seen much of Montero, but when they talk about him being too big to play catcher, you’d think he’s the size of Jonathon Broxton or something. Montero looks pretty reasonably proportioned to play catcher. Now, he may simply not have the physical tools to do it, but he appear too big for the position just by the looks of him.

    • Andy in Sunny Daytona

      Whenever anyone in the organization mentions Jesus Montero and Austin Romine in the same sentence, they are subliminally mentioning Gary Sanchez/Jestin Romtero.

  • http://www.lessthismorethat.com/author/ddarrell Jamal G.

    That four-year, $100-million deal many think may be coming to Jeter after the season ends strikes me as a bad investment.

    I had to.

  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

    The Yanks don’t mind the empty Legends Suite seats because those customers are inside conducting business.

    River Ave. Hookers.

  • Thomas

    Is it just me or does the person two to the right of Levine look remarkably like Sheffield (pre-goatee)?

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      It’s just you; personally, I don’t see it.

      That’s Ruben Diaz Jr., Bronx Borough President.
      http://www.norwoodnews.org/med.....n-diaz,-jr..jpg (safe)

      • Thomas

        Yeah, he definitely doesn’t look like Sheff in the picture you attached.

  • pat

    Is that Joba? Probably still trying to make amends for the DUI.

  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

    How nice of Joba to put on a jacket and tie.

    (rolls eyes)

    • Rick in Boston

      At least he tucked in his…or at least he’s not wearing…Mo seriously needs to get his boy hooked up.

    • http://twitter.com/dpatrickg Dirty Pena

      Would you want to be wearing a full suit in this weather?

      • Rich M.

        Big Stein would have been rocking the turtleneck and blazer.

        • Andy in Sunny Daytona

          Big Bank Hank would be putting his Kool’s out on home plate

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            Hal: WHO HAS BEEN PUTTIN’ OUT THEY KOOLS ON MY FLOOR?!?!?

    • Andy in Sunny Daytona

      At least he wore a brand new shirt for the event……….at least it looks like it.

    • vin

      He’s from Nebraska… what did you expect him to wear? Lucky he’s not wearing overalls.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        I’m from Nebraska. Every time I was in the presence of the Bronx Borough President at a public event, I wore a suit and tie.

        And I’m not making several hundred thousand dollars a year like Joba is. I’m not one of the public faces of a multi-billion-dollar organization like Joba is.

        • vin

          Yeah, but do you grunt and fart your way to Holds and Strikeouts? The man has a persona he needs to maintain.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            Touché.

            Bulls in china shops do not wear jackets and ties. I sit corrected.

    • Chris

      Was he the only player there?

    • C-Mac

      He’s wearing jeans, too.

  • Rose

    The current Yankees are all failures. Why would anybody bring Derek Jeter or Mariano Rivera back? They’re old and we all know old players decline and they are clearly declining. And the free agency has all bad players who are underachieving. In fact, I don’t like anybody at all. Knibb High Football Rules!

    /Bret’d

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Private Rose, you are definitely born again hard. Hell, I may even allow you to serve as a rifleman in my beloved Corps.

  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

    One day, Mariano Rivera, the Yanks’ “Energizer bunny,” will hang it up. “It’s going to be hell replacing him. He has been the most meaningful Yankee during this stretch,” Cashman said.

    Et tu, Brian?

    • Ed

      I think Jeter and Rivera are the only people you can say believably there. Whoever he says there is going to bring it up in contract negotiations after the season.

      Mo’s already said he’d be ok with a 1 year deal. We’ve talked here about 4/$100m for Jeter. Saying something that may result in Mo getting more leverage is less costly than something that gives Jeter more leverage.

  • Joe

    “The talent, said the GM, stems from the recognition in the mid-2000s that the team just couldn’t spend away its problems.”

    CC Sabathia $161 million, Burnett $82.5 million, Teixeria $180 million
    I wonder what it would look like if they decided to spend away their problems?

    Is Cashman kidding?

    • Carlosologoist in Humid Ass Colombia

      Two of those contracts were given out to players under 30 (Teixeira 28, CC 29). You´re trying to make it sound as if Cashman made a mistake in signing players in their prime years to long term contracts.

      • Tony

        your right

        • Tony

          forca Portugal!!!