Jun
21

Yanks pick up finale from Mets

By

The Yankees needed this one. Not only to take the series, or to tie the season series, but to get on some kind of roll. They ran like a blitzkrieg through the light portion of their schedule before the offense sputtered against the Phillies. It has come alive a bit more over the last couple of days. Maybe the Yanks can use this to rally through their remaining NL schedule.

Biggest Hit: The only big hit of the game

Photo credit: Kathy Willens/AP

Though the Yankees managed nine hits yesterday, the onle ones that amounted to runs were the four in the third. Brett Gardner led off with a liner to left, which Jeter followed with a tapper that turned into an infield single. I’m not sure why Nick Swisher decided to bunt in that situation, but it caught the Mets off guard. He pushed it past Johan Santana all the way to Ike Davis. Ruben Tejada ran to cover first, but Santana didn’t see him there. They collided and the ball fell to the dirt. The Yanks had bases loaded and none out.

Looking for a strikeout or a groundball, Santana started working Teixeira with a pair of changeups low. He missed on the first and got Tex to swing over the second. On the 1-1 pitch Santana went to his fastball, trying to run it in on Teixeira. He succeeded, but Tex had enough time to get around on the 91 mph pitch. Just as Michael Kay told us that Santana had allowed two grand slams this year and four in his career, Teixeira made it three and five. The ball went over the scoreboard in left and gave the Yankees a 4-0 lead.

“If it’s 94, 95 he doesn’t come close to doing what he did,” said catcher Rod Barajas after the game.

We’re still waiting for Teixeira to hit consistently. He’s shown signs like this all year long, which means he’s been productive at times. Once he gets in a groove — and yes, I’m still confident he will — we should see much of the same production we did last summer.

Biggest Pitch: Sabathia induces the 5-4-3 double play

Photo credit: Kathy Willens/AP

For his second straight start CC Sabathia was involved in a marquee matchup. He pitched very well on Monday, allowing just three runs through seven innings. Even those came in just one inning, after he took a comebacker off the pitching hand. After that he seemed fine, much better than the starts in which he struggled in May. This time he faced Johan Santana, which of course brings a bit of history. Santana had defeated Sabathia in their Sunday matchup earlier in the year, but he would not complete the sweep.

Before the seventh inning CC had allowed no more than one baserunner per inning. He had walked the leadoff man in the fifth and allowed a leadoff double in the sixth, but both times he stranded him. Then, in the seventh he finally faced a situation with two runners on. It started with an Ike Davis single to lead off the inning and continued when Jason Bay drew a walk. CC alternated fastball and changeup to get Rod Barajas swinging, but the Mets still had two more outs to go.

Fernando Tatis took care of both of them. CC dropped a slider over the outside half for strike one, and then threw a changeup in the dirt. He came back with a changeup on the next pitch, and it actually looked like a decent pitch. But Tatis got on top of it, grounding it to A-Rod, who flipped the ball to Cano, who flipped in turn to Teixeira to complete the 5-4-3 double play and end the inning.

Photo credit: Kathy Willens/AP

CC ended with an excellent line: 8 IP, 4 H, 0 R, 2 BB, 6 K, 66 of 100 pitches for strikes. Had it not been for the rain delay I have to think he’d have come out for the ninth. But there’s no complaining when Mo comes in and works his magic.

Miscellany

Photo credit: Kathy Willens/AP

Brett Gardner continues to impress both in the field and at the plate. He led off the rally that led to Tex’s slam with a single, a liner the opposite way on a belt high fastball. He also made an excellent catch on a Rod Barajas fly ball out by the wall in left. His .378 wOBA is not only right around what Johnny Damon posted last year, but is also .001 ahead of Carl Crawford. UZR doesn’t rate his defense particularly well right now, -2.0, but according to John Dewan’s +/- system Gardner has saved five defensive runs.

Teixeira since the five-strikeout game: 13 for 47 with three doubles, four homers, and nine walks. That puts his triple slash at .276/.414/.596.

Posada since the grand slam game: 8 for 22 (.364) with a double and three jacks. That’s an .818 SLG, homes.

Granderson since returning from the DL: .257/.333/.514. Power’s there for sure, but he could stand to get on base a little more frequently.

On a less optimistic note, A-Rod since leaving the Orioles game: 2 for 18 with a double and just two walks.

The only Yankee starters without a hit were Cano and Rodriguez. Cano was hit by a pitch.

Graph, box, highlights

Yeah, I could use a graph like this right about now.

More at FanGraphs. Also check the box score and highlights.

Up Next

They’re flying out to Arizona, where A.J. Burnett will look to right the ship against Rodrigo Lopez. Game, unfortunately, starts at 10.

Categories : Game Stories

47 Comments»

  1. Pat D says:

    “Game, unfortunately, starts at 10.”

    Ha! Not if you work until 10:30. I’ll actually be able to see nearly all of every game this week for a change!

    And, of course, if they play badly, I accept full responsibility.

  2. pat says:

    Unfortunately I could only watch parts of the past couple games with the closed captions on. What were Kay and co. babbling about Reyes and Cano trying to show off for each other? Something about the high leg kicks while turning the dp?

  3. Frittoman626 says:

    Lets hope the Yankees sweep both The D-Backs and The Dodgers, and distance themselves from the damn Red Sox

    • Templeton "Brendog" Peck says:

      Lets hope the Yankees sweep both The D-Backs and The Dodgers, and distance themselves from the damn Red Sox Rays

      there, fixed that for you

  4. Dela G says:

    9pm cst start time is perfectly fine with me

  5. Cecala says:

    Is there a comparative stat to show who got the better of the Granderson trade? I know I can not use WAR due to Granderson being out a month, but is there anything else?

  6. DaveinMD says:

    You have to wonder about a defensive metric that said Teixeira wasn’t a good defensive player and now says Gardner isn’t one.

    • No you don’t, not if you acknowledge that the defensive metric is subject to SSS oddities, just like all statistics are.

      Should we question batting average, on base percentage, and slugging percentage simply because they say Marcus Thames is currently better in all three of those statistics than both Derek Jeter and Mark Teixeira?

      • deuce bag poster says:

        UZR has some serious flaws though (as does, BTW, BA). I’m very skeptical of a statistic that seems to contradict almost everybody’s opinions on certain players’ defense regularly. For example, last year it said that Howard was better than Tex. This is possible but with the flaws we know UZR has, I take this with a huge grain of salt since almost everybody who has watched both players play, as well as scouts, would claim Tex was better last year.

        • Oh, but of course it has flaws, as every stat does, as you acknowledged. But the statement that Dave made, that UZR must obviously be flawed because Player X is currently better in the eyes of the stat than Player Y, that statement is not an accurate criticism of ANY stat, because all stats are subject to noise and randomness in small sample sizes. That was my only point.

          I’m very skeptical of a statistic that seems to contradict almost everybody’s opinions on certain players’ defense regularly.

          And I’m very skeptical of almost everybody’s opinions, especially in terms of baseball players. There’s shitloads of faulty eyewitness memory, false narrative, and erronous groupthink in the general consensus about any given baseball player.

          For example, last year it said that Howard was better than Tex. This is possible but with the flaws we know UZR has, I take this with a huge grain of salt since almost everybody who has watched both players play, as well as scouts, would claim Tex was better last year.

          And yet, while I watched Tex and saw him have a great year defensively, Ryan Howard also had a great year defensively from what I saw of him (which was admittedly far less than what I saw of Tex). I don’t think it’s that hard to believe that Howard could have had a better year than Tex defensively, especially when we’re only considering lateral range on fielding balls hit towards their respective zones (which is all UZR does) and not scoops and throws, the other main parts of fielding at 1B.

          • deuce bag poster says:

            And I’m very skeptical of almost everybody’s opinions, especially in terms of baseball players. There’s shitloads of faulty eyewitness memory, false narrative, and erronous groupthink in the general consensus about any given baseball player.

            True, but with the major flaws UZR has I think both people’s opinions AND the statistic need to be taken into account when considering defensive range, as well as some other defensive statistics, in order to come to a consensus on player x’s range. I’m sure it will become reliable in a relatively short period of time, but right now UZR is not that reliable. It is a useful tool in discerning range, but IMO not much more than that and certainly not the final, definitive decision on the matter.

            And yet, while I watched Tex and saw him have a great year defensively, Ryan Howard also had a great year defensively from what I saw of him (which was admittedly far less than what I saw of Tex). I don’t think it’s that hard to believe that Howard could have had a better year than Tex defensively, especially when we’re only considering lateral range on fielding balls hit towards their respective zones (which is all UZR does) and not scoops and throws, the other main parts of fielding at 1B.

            It’s true that UZR does not measure scoops and throws and doesn’t claim to. But I have yet to speak to a person who’s seen both Tex and Howard play claim Howard was the better defender, even last year. Of course, they might be wrong. But I think with UZR’s flaws their opinion should be taken into account.

        • Doug says:

          UZR needs a three-year sample because of the relative scarcity of defensive opportunities.

    • deuce bag poster says:

      Hm, I agree. I’m not saying that we should trust our fallible memories and eyes alone (and to be fair UZR only said Tex was a bit below average last year) but I take all UZR readings with a huge grain of salt.

      • (and to be fair UZR only said Tex was a bit below average last year)

        And that’s the other important point.

        UZR never says anyone is a good fielder or a bad fielder. It’s incapable of saying that. UZR only says whether someone is an above or below average fielder.

        If the average defensive player is good, than you can be below average and still good. “Average” is a mathematical concept, “good” is a subjective judgment.

        • DaveinMD says:

          I understand the concepts thank you very much. I also watch a lot of baseball. Gardner is not anywhere near below average as an outfielder Teixeira was no where near below average as a first baseman. The metric depends on human observation as well. It is extremely flawed.

          • Gardner is not anywhere near below average as an outfielder Teixeira was no where near below average as a first baseman.

            I agree, they’re not below average defensive players. That doesn’t mean that they can’t be below average for any given small sample size, though. They can be.

            But while they can be and are below average over the occasional small sample here and there, over the long haul, they’re both exceedingly better than their peers at fielding their positions. Which their career UZR numbers indicate, BTW.

            I like to think of myself as a fairly smart guy, but I say dumb shit on occasions. It happens. Nobody’s awesome all the time.

            • the209 says:

              You say: “If the average defensive player is good, than you can be below average and still good. “Average” is a mathematical concept, “good” is a subjective judgment”

              I respectfully disagree. You can’t just ‘add’ the math at whatever pt you (the UZR creator) want to in the stat, and then say it’s “objective.”

              UZR starts with eyeball assessments of individual players… averaging all these together (math!) doesn’t make it any less subjective. Just the average of a bunch of subjective measurements….

              • No, it’s the average of a bunch of OBJECTIVE measurements, not subjective ones. UZR simply sees where the ball was hit, records whether or not the fielder made an out on that ball hit to that spot, and compares it to the average of how many balls hit to that spot are converted into outs by all other players.

                It’s only comparing a player to the average of his peers. It’s not making any subjective claims about goodness or badness.

                • the209 says:

                  Yes, but it’s rating each and every one of those players based on subjective judgments, no?

                  (I’m not arguing — I’m asking, btw)…

                  From this site:

                  “Criticism

                  Earlier this week, Mike Rogers at Bless You Boys examined UZR, noting its ups and downs. He makes good points as to the limitations of UZR. The main point is the subjectivity of the batted ball type. What one stringer sees as a medium hit fly ball another might see as hard. Also, limiting the data to just three classifications might provide simplicity, but it also detracts from accuracy….”

    • Mike Axisa says:

      Two things about UZR.

      1. It’s best used over a large sample, as in several years. Over the last three years, Tex is +15.5 UZR (+6.6 per 150 defensive games), second best among all 1B (linky).

      2. UZR isn’t perfect for first baseman because it doesn’t consider throws from the other infielders.

  7. Yankees – Diamondbacks GAMEDAY! A.J. Burnett, RHP (6-5, 4.33) vs Rodrigo Lopez, RHP (2-6, 4.70)

  8. http://bit.ly/chyTKS Current Yankees (sans Tex) eats Rodrigo Lopez for lunch

  9. http://bit.ly/9m3FQ8 ON the flipside, current D-backs haven’t faced AJ Burnett Much.

  10. AND IT IS OFFICIALLY SUMMER!!!!!! This is the time that the Yankees fire on all cylinders. Beating on a crap Arizona team should help.

  11. “Game starts at 10″

    Trade off. We get the Arizona bullpen. Feast, my pretties, feast

  12. Mo's Savant says:

    I want to believe Alex will crush the shit out of the ball in Arizona. That park is a right-handed hitter’s Yankee Stadium. It’ll also help that he’s going against Dan Haren, who leads the NL in HR allowed with 18 (!).

  13. China Joe says:

    Possible headline for tomorrow’s Yankees-DBacks preview: “…Rodrigo Lopez is Still in Baseball???”

    • Frittoman626 says:

      I wont say anything because the Yankees got beat by MOYER AND KENDRICK, so you never know ):

      • Rick in Boston says:

        But Moyer and Kendrick haven’t given up 31 homers to the Yankees over the course of their careers. That’s more than twice what he’s given up to any other team (linky).

  14. Frittoman626 says:

    The Yankees should sweep the D-Backs and The Dodgers

  15. Jamal G. says:

    I’m not sure why Nick Swisher decided to bunt in that situation, but it caught the Mets off guard.

    That’s exactly why he did it. The Book says that it was actually an opportune time to lay down a bunt. Bunting is actually recommended to the point where it keeps the defense honest, even at a cost to the bunting team’s run and win expectancies. Considering the Mets were playing so far back, the average cost in run expectancy from first and second with nobody out to second and third with one out is roughly 0.1 runs, taking advantage of their positioning was actually a pretty good decision on Swisher’s part.

  16. Tampa Yankee says:

    Granderson since returning from the DL: .257/.333/.514. Power’s there for sure, but he could stand to get on base a little more frequently.

    /Jethrobaited

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