Oct
22

Obvious: Yanks and Girardi ready for a reunion

By

We didn’t bring it up all week, because it comes from a dubious source, but there were rumblings that Joe Girardi was on his way out regardless of results this postseason. But then the Cubs hired Mike Quade, which dulled those already questionable rumors. This morning SI’s Jon Heyman states the obvious:

The Yankees plan to bring back manager Joe Girardi at a raise, no matter what some fans may say about his reliance on his ever-present binder. He is well-liked by Yankees honchos Hal Steinbrenner, Randy Levine and Brian Cashman.

Even if Chicago had its managerial spot still open, it was questionable whether Girardi would seriously consider the job. He already has one World Championship under his belt, and his team is back in the ALCS this year. That’s a success by any standards — beyond, of course, the insane mindset that anything less than a World Series championship is unacceptable. Girardi has done well in his three seasons, and I can’t think of a single manager who I’d rather have guiding the team.

As a side note, the “ever-present binder” comment now makes me think of the recent Simpsons episode. When Lisa asks Mo about strategy, he replies, “The only thing I know about strategy is that whatever the manager does, it’s wrong. Unless it works, in which case he’s a button-pusher.” Or a binder-reader, as it were.

Categories : Front Office
  • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

    It’s trendy to bash Girardi for the binder, but get real, every manager uses statistics (to some degree) to make decisions. I prefer that to just guess work gut feel.

    • Dick Whitman

      Dusty Baker?

    • Brooklyn Ed

      Tony LaRussa?

    • A.D.

      Exactly, at least he has his written down where it’s easy to find.

    • Mister Delaware

      I love the idea of the binder. Even if I sometimes wonder exactly what sort of data is in there, the fact that he relies on data over “feel” is a major plus in my book. Or my binder, as the case may be.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Even if I sometimes wonder exactly what sort of data is in there, the fact that he relies on data over “feel” is a major plus in my book.

        And even that’s probably not accurate.

        The fact that Joe has a binder doesn’t mean that he reflexively relies on data over “feel”. It means he wants to always be able to consult the data and use it in addition to his “feel” to make a decision with more information rather than less information.

        That’s a good thing.

        • Mister Delaware

          There you go. I basically take it out of the blind “feel” category once you start to use the stats. If his gut says Swisher is pressing and Kearns is due, I imagine the binder would tell him not to sit Swisher. Basically a safety net of logic.

        • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

          “The fact that Joe has a binder doesn’t mean that he reflexively relies on data over “feel”.”

          Okay, let me give you an example………the other night, he has Robertson start the 7th. The guys is dealing…..makes Andrus look stupid on a strikeout, then gets Young to broken bat a blooper to first. We all know how great Robertson is when he comes out looking like that……..almost unhittable.
          But then he gets yanked for Boone Logan. I’m sorry, but I truly find this shit to be stupid. No matter how good D-Rob looked, he was out after two batters regardless, despite the fact that he’s just a touch better against rightees then lefties anyway.

          Logan should have been in the previous inning to face Murphy, but Girardi has already made up his mind that Logan is here for one purpose……to face Hamilton. And that’s working out splendidly. But hey, he Joe “loves the matchup”!

          • Mister Delaware

            If Hamilton had blasted one off Robertson everyone would cry “WHY DO WE EVEN HAVE A LOOGY IF YOU AREN’T GOING TO USE HIM AGAINST THE OTHER TEAM’S BEST LEFTY”.

            • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

              See, that’s where your wrong. If, by chance, that did happen, and Girardi said after the game, “I stayed with David because he looked tremendous coming out today and as this season has shown us, when he looks like that, he can get anyone out”, that would be fine by me.
              That’s called “knowing our personel”. I was shocked he took Robertson out right there with bases empty and two outs, the way he was throwing………and it’s not like Logan is a known nemesis to Hamilton.

              Sorry, I didn’t get it. I thought it was overmanaging.

              • Mister Delaware

                Girardi knows our personnel far better than you or I and I’m sure he was well aware that lefties had a .388 OBP against D-Rob and a .286 OBP against Logan. And I bet he was further aware that some of those times reaching base came when Robertson was “looking really good”. And if that’s whats in the binder and dictating Girardi’s decisions, that’s awesome. You want feel managing, watch some Cardinals games. But not now, next year because, despite being in a shitty division and having the best hitter and two of the better pitchers in baseball, they’re home for the winter.

    • vin

      Joe Torre?

      • Mister Delaware

        If Joe Torre still managed the Yanks, David Robertson would be dead from overuse. Literally dead.

        • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

          “If Joe Torre still managed the Yanks, David Robertson would be dead from overuse. Literally dead.”

          As opposed to Girardi’s bullpen work, in which he sacrifices ballgames by lifting guys routinely too soon to save their arms for the postseason, then they get lit up anyway in the postseason.

          Good think he preserved the arms of Robertson, Chamberlain, Logan, and Mitre this season, so they could all be revved up to be slaughtered by Texas.

          • Mister Delaware

            Are you saying that if D-Rob had pitched 15 more regular season games, he wouldn’t have given up as many groundball singles through the 5-6 hole in Game 3? Or that we could have won 103 regular season games if some games weren’t “sacrificed” by Girardi protecting pitchers?

            • http://twitter.com/Mattpat11 Matt DiBari

              I think the argument could very easily be made that the Yankees might have won the division and home field advantage if Girardi didn’t keep bringing Gaudin, Mitre and Ring into a pennant race.

              Whether or not that would have made a difference is the real question.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            As opposed to Girardi’s bullpen work, in which he sacrifices ballgames by lifting guys routinely too soon to save their arms for the postseason, then they get lit up anyway in the postseason.

            Sacrificing regular season ballgames >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> sacrificing the healthy careers of bullpen pitchers entirely

    • Big Stein

      Joe Torre?

      Bobby V?

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      It’s trendy to bash Girardi for the binder, but get real, every manager uses statistics (to some degree) to make decisions.

      Mathchups, matchups, matchups matchups!!!!!
      How about managing to the flow of the game, which this guy absolutely never does! Everything is pre-planned.
      HE even admits this…….how many times do you hear this guy say after a game……”well, I had planned on using D-Rob in the 6th, and and then matching up with Joba and Boone in the 7th, and blah, blah, blah…..”
      That’s just not the way sporting events work. Girardi is lucky he manages the Yankees, because their talent covers up most of his stupid moves.

      Not saying Girardi is a bomb as a manager. But he is extremely replacable. Extremely.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        HE even admits this…….how many times do you hear this guy say after a game……”well, I had planned on using D-Rob in the 6th, and and then matching up with Joba and Boone in the 7th, and blah, blah, blah…..”

        List of managers who pre-plan how they’d like to use their available bench and bullpen players as the game plays itself out:

        All of them, ever.

        • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

          List of managers who pre-plan how they’d like to use their available bench and bullpen players as the game plays itself out:

          That doesn’t mean you stick by the plan regardless of how the starter does. Should have made myself more clear. You can have an IDEA of how you want things to pan out, but you can’t force control over how the game will be played.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            And he doesn’t force control over how the game will be played. Sometimes he deviates from the script, sometimes he has faith in the script working so he sticks with it.

            Just like every other manager, ever.

            ————-

            Side note: Please use bold or italics to quote passages from other posters. It makes your posts so much easier to read and understand. Thanks in advance (again).

      • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

        “It’s trendy to bash Girardi for the binder…….”

        The binder itself isn’t the problem. I don’t care if he carries a copy of “Baseball For Dummies” around with him all day. The problem is that he exclusively allows the info in the binder to manage the baseball game. And while that binder may be filled with well-documented and well researched facts and statistics to be used as a guide, there are a large degree of decisions that should be made on instinctive hunches and daily conditions, and recent trends.

        Girardi’s gravestone will read, “He loved baseball, his family, and the matchup.”

        • DF

          And while that binder may be filled with well-documented and well researched facts and statistics to be used as a guide, there are a large degree of decisions that should be made on instinctive hunches and daily conditions, and recent trends.

          I’d say it’s the exact opposite. Getting caught up in trends, which might illusory, or hunches that have no identifiable basis in anything, is a bad way to manage. It’s akin to trying to time the stock market. It can’t really be done, not consistently. Those who think they can are generally the wins most primed for a disaster when their luck, which they don’t believe in, runs out.

          • DF

            Wow, typo city.

            trends, which might BE illusory

            -and-

            generally the ONES (not wins) most primed for a disaster

            /needs to register

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            If you have a hunch and you crosscheck that hunch with the statistical record and it says your hunch is wrong, trust the stats and not your hunch. Stats are far less prone to bias and logical fallacy than hunches are.

            • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

              Okay, have it your way champ. We’ve watched an entire season of Yankee baseball, and all of Joe Girardi’s moves have made perfect sense. And the playoffs too!

              The guy is an average manager. He can be replaced without missing a beat, whether you agree with that or not.

              • Giovanni G.

                You were complaining about Girardi last year when we were having a parade right?

          • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

            I’d say it’s the exact opposite. Getting caught up in trends, which might illusory, or hunches that have no identifiable basis in anything, is a bad way to manage.

            No it isn’t! That’s what seperates good managers from bad ones. Otherwise, the guy who gathers all the statistical analysis can be the one making the bullpen moves. I’m not saying to get caught up in hunches…….but every now and then, let the hot hand stay in the game instead of bowing to the matchup the binder says you should want.

            • http://itsaboutthemoney.net Brien Jackson

              I honestly don’t know how anyone can actually believe this nonsense.

              • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                Let’s see……let statistial analysis guide you, but also manage to the flow of the game and know which guys on your team are hot, and which ones aren’t.

                Yeah, that’s just unbelievable nonsense.

                • http://itsaboutthemoney.net Brien Jackson

                  Are you familiar with the term “confirmation bias?”

  • CBean

    I was frustrated with some of Girardi’s decisions on Tuesday’s game, starting with having Cervelli catch, but overall, I still think he’s a good manager and we are in the playoffs. He can’t be blamed for the fact that our offense didn’t do anything until this last game.

    • Mister Delaware

      Yeah, although I give some leeway here. 5 or so years ago, we wouldn’t have accepted a that a seemingly league average guy like Gutierrez is actually a major plus in CF even at a .325 OBP because the defensive numbers weren’t there to back it up. Now they are. C/1B defense is still pretty unquantifiable and I’m willing to bet that we underrate both, possibly by a decent margin. We can see the passed balls and SB%, but those are somewhat dependent stats with shared blame (runners not held on, scorer’s decisions, cross ups, missed spots, etc, etc). The fact that Posada can catch is usually seen as good enough reason to put him back there, just like Giambi didn’t fall over so we still saw him as a solid plus at 1B because he could rake. If someone eventually crunches the numbers and shows that Posada (and others) can be such a bad receiver of the ball that its costing pitchers strikes, maybe that view changes and defensive catchers are more valued. (Same with 1Bs and their ability to save runs on throws. Major reason Teix is far more solid than his numbers show.)

      Of course, even with all the data in the world, the problem is that Cervelli doesn’t appear to be all that much better.

    • Big Stein

      he had cervelli catch because AJ is a head case, who doesn’t feel comfortable with jorge.

      there are a number of factors in AJ’s poor season, I would bet a significant factor was not having Molina hold his hand.

      I know it’s wacked, but even all-time greats like Steve Carlton and Greg Maddox couldn’t pitch without their own hand picked personal catcher.

      • Mister Delaware

        I thought it was because Eiland was gone.

        (Incredibly fun fact: AJ’s best ERA by catcher, over 50 innings worked together, is Paul LoDuca.)

      • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

        “I know it’s wacked, but even all-time greats like Steve Carlton and Greg Maddox couldn’t pitch without their own hand picked personal catcher.”

        Yes they could!! They just earned the right to choose who they wanted catching them, because they were so dominant. Would you really put Burnett in their class?

        I mean honestly, you think Greg Maddux “couldn’t pitch” if Charlie O’Brien went on the DL??

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      “I was frustrated with some of Girardi’s decisions on Tuesday’s game, starting with having Cervelli catch, but overall, I still think he’s a good manager and we are in the playoffs.”

      Honestly though, this is a team that has to be managed OUT OF a playoff spot. If you’re a passable manager, you get this team to the playoffs. And Girardi is a passable manager.
      In is 3 years here, he’s managed them right out of the division lead TWICE.

      • Mister Delaware

        Just for fun, list all the managers you’d take over Girardi.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        And Girardi is a passable manager. In is 3 years here, he’s managed them right out of the division lead TWICE.

        Yes, in 2008 it was Girardi who managed us out of the division lead, it wasn’t the fact that Sidney Ponson, Darrell Rasner, Dan Geise, Carl Pavano, and Ian Kennedy made a combined 56 starts that year with a collective 5.00ish ERA. Or that, thanks to injuries, Melky Cabrera (68+) had more plate appearances than Hideki Matsui and Jorge Posada combined.

        It wasn’t any of that that caused us to miss the playoffs, it was stupid Joe Girardi and his Binder of Idiocy.

        (rolls eyes)

        • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

          Yes, in 2008 it was Girardi who managed us out of the division lead, it wasn’t the fact that Sidney Ponson, Darrell Rasner, Dan Geise, Carl Pavano, and Ian Kennedy made a combined 56 starts that year with a collective 5.00ish ERA.

          Oh, boo-hoo. He had to deal with a few injuries. So did Torre during certain years, but his entrance into the playoffs was still taken for granted.

  • A.D.

    and I can’t think of a single manager who I’d rather have guiding the team.

    Surely you mean aside from LaRussa?

    • http://www.twitter.com/deanezag Zack

      Montero would come up and get 10 ABs in a month because he didn’t cut his hair the right way

    • http://twitter.com/AndrewLeighNYC Andrew

      Kevin Russo and Colin Curtis would start a randomly high percentage of the team’s games because LaRussa would have a crush on them since they “are grinders and do the little things to help ball clubs win games”, or some such nonsense. No thanks on him.

    • pete

      Colby Rasmus says hi from LaRussa jail.

      • http://www.twitter.com/tomzig Tom Zig

        ietc

    • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

      Tony LaRussa, the man who invented the four pitcher inning.

      • Mister Delaware

        Pretty sure TLR would get an erection just knowing he was given credit for it.

      • CP

        Ron Washington, the man who invented the five pitcher out.

  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

    As a side note, the “ever-present binder” comment now makes me think of the recent Simpsons episode. When Lisa asks Mo about strategy, he replies, “The only thing I know about strategy is that whatever the manager does, it’s wrong. Unless it works, in which case he’s a button-pusher.” Or a binder-reader, as it were.

    Lisa, I want to buy your rock.

    • Slugger27

      we’re here, we’re queer, we don’t want any more bears

  • Januz

    Unless the Yankees wanted him to leave, I did not think there would be any way that Girardi would go to the Cubs. This organization really seems to be cursed by the goat: 100 plus years of futility and are a very long way from contending.

    • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

      …a very long way from contending.

      If only they knew that.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      This organization really seems to be cursed by the goat…

      http://gamesnet.vo.llnwd.net/o.....1_main.jpg

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      “Unless the Yankees wanted him to leave, I did not think there would be any way that Girardi would go to the Cubs.”

      How could you possibly know this?

  • A.D.

    his reliance on his ever-present binder.

    Just wait, with the next young manager it will be an iPad

    • http://twitter.com/AndrewLeighNYC Andrew

      Not at Yankee Stadium, he wouldn’t be able to get that thing through security.

  • mike c (LETS GO YANK KEEEZ)

    good, i like joe

  • ZZ

    The problem with Girardi’s overuse of the binder is that he doesn’t really seem to know how to consistently apply those statistics correctly.

    The most troubling thing with the increased popularity of advanced stats is that many of the managers fans and media who use them don’t have any sort of in depth understanding of how to apply them.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Source: people I trust

      • ZZ

        Why do I need a source for a personal observation based on the moves he makes.

        Source ZZ

        • whozat

          Your hypothesis that you believe explains the moves he makes.

          Alternate hypothesis: Joe understands the advanced stats just fine, but sometimes makes a decision to ignore them and act on information that we do not have, or go with a hunch.

          Is that distinguishable from your hypothesis, based on the available evidence? No. So neither is particularly useful.

          • Mister Delaware

            Or, better than a hunch, he knows a reliever has been up all night with diarrhea and is too dehydrated to pitch in a situation where stats would dictate he should.

            • CP

              Didn’t he pitch Park anyway?

              • Mister Delaware

                I think he did. Perhaps the diarrhea chart dictated Park was still ok to go?

        • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

          “Why do I need a source for a personal observation based on the moves he makes.”

          Because the guy responding to you is a know-it-all who is intent on defending the manager despite the nonsense that goes on right before everyone’s eyes.

          You need sources for your observations……he doesn’t. He’ll just flat out tell you that putting the go-ahead run on first and leaving a shitty pitcher in to get out of the jam in a one run game was a smart thing to do.

    • Big Stein

      on the other hand, most statheads have no idea how to grip a cutter.

      • Mister Delaware

        This might blow your mind, but I threw a knuckle curve when I played and I’m a super stathead.

        (It just spun 70% of the time, but that’s beyond the point.)

      • whozat

        And that has precisely what to do with managing a ballclub?

      • http://www.riveraveblues.com Joe Pawlikowski

        on the other hand, most statheads people have no idea how to grip a cutter.

        FTFY

        • Mister Delaware

          Oh, but you’re wrong Joe. If you don’t like / understand advanced statistics, it automatically makes you part of the “I played the game” club. Even if you didn’t play the game. Or the stathead did.

    • CP

      During the regular season you have to balance what the statistics say against the reality that it’s a 162 game season and these are people that you’re managing. Just because a move would give the best chance to win a given game doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s the right move. The post season is a little bit easier to judge because the goal is to win every game.

      This also doesn’t even touch on the fact that people will complain even when the move is supported by stats (like bringing in Logan to pitch to Hamilton or walking Murphy to face Bengie Molina).

      • nsalem

        Is putting the winning run on base in a must win game supported
        by any statistics? Is there any stat that tells you your pitcher may be through when he is wild while issuing an IW?
        Poor management has to take a good share of the responsibility
        for our game 4 loss, which may very well have cost us our season.

    • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

      Well, just because they’re applied correctly doesn’t guarantee success.

    • Tank Foster

      Can you give some examples?

      I agree that we have a wealth of statistics, but a true understanding of them, or the significance of them, is much less well understood.

      I think 90% of the time, criticism of managerial decisions is just alot of hot air. Why?

      1. Because in most cases, when it comes to overall win expectancy, the degree to which the player executes is far, far more important than the difference in strategy A versus strategy B.

      2. Because, even when strategy B might have been better than strategy A, it is very hard to quantify the difference, especially when you view the decisions in the context of the unfolding game. Meaning…strategy B might improve win expectancy over strategy A by X percent, when viewed in a vacuum. But strategy A might open up further game possibilities down the road which can’t be accounted for in numbers.

      An example of what I’m talking about in number 2 is the oft-maligned decision to bunt a runner into scoring position. We know that in most cases, the chance of winning is greater when you don’t bunt, but this is largely because bunting decreases the chances of scoring multiple runs. Often bunting can increase the chance of scoring a single run.

      What we don’t know is, could that single run, perhaps, relax the pitcher, by giving him a lead, which leads to better performance? Could it relax the hitters, who feel less pressured at the plate. Could it stress the opposing team, who are now behind? If you “gamble” for the big inning by not bunting (I know, it isn’t really a gamble, but let’s think of it that way) and come up empty, do you give the other team an emotional lift?

      We spend way too much time worrying about managerial in-game tactics. I think managers’ overall season strategy – how they use players, rest and distribute the pitching load, etc. – is far more important than in-game managing.

      I think Girardi is a very good manager in terms of running the team over the course of a season, using players effectively, etc.

      • Mister Delaware

        “What we don’t know is, could that single run, perhaps, relax the pitcher, by giving him a lead, which leads to better performance? Could it relax the hitters, who feel less pressured at the plate. Could it stress the opposing team, who are now behind? If you “gamble” for the big inning by not bunting (I know, it isn’t really a gamble, but let’s think of it that way) and come up empty, do you give the other team an emotional lift?”

        That’s all hindsight narrative. The winning team relaxed or the losing team got tense only after the fact, when the game is over. 50% of the time, it doesn’t work out and something else is narrated in to explain why.

        • Tank Foster

          How do you know it’s hindsight narrative? I realize we don’t have any way of seeing or knowing about psychological things, but there is no doubt they exist. Performance anxiety exists; confident, relaxed players do better than tense, nervous players, etc. It’s been proven over and over in the laboratory; if it didn’t work, there wouldn’t be sports psychologists out there.

          And I’m not suggesting it’s always correct to bunt in order to try to get a psychological edge.

          I’m just saying that there are things which are both real and unquantifiable that confound analyzing managerial moves totally by things such as “win expectancy” stats.

          • Mister Delaware

            Except that win expectancy says “if X happens, you win Y percent of the time”. So 1-Y percent of the time, you lose. And if that’s above 50%, you’re searching for a new narrative.

          • Mister Delaware

            And really, its borderline insulting the imply that Cliff Lee* would be a nervous mess if a 3rd inning run weren’t bunted in but that he relaxes and dominates if it is.

            * Pick any professional you like. Cliff Lee used to highlight the silliness.

          • Mister Delaware

            And, and … if you believe 0 leads to nerves and 1 leads to calm, wouldn’t 2 lead to super calm and mean that a single opposition run could no longer take you back to nerves?

          • DF

            You’re also disregarding the fact that if your scenario was true, it would show up in the results. If the players relax because of that one run with any kind of regularity or consistency, then it would stand to reason that they would win more often as a result. If they don’t, then either the calming/tensing effect doesn’t exist, or it exists but has no effect.

            You can’t have this both ways. Either it works and should therefore be in the stats, or it doesn’t work and making decisions on cold logic is exactly right.

          • Tank Foster

            You guys are completely missing the point. You are begging the question. You’re saying that if you can’t quantify something, it doesn’t exist. The pejorative “narrative” term is applicable only in certain contexts. Saying you “know” something occurred because of a psychological effect, or disregarding some data to focus on something non-numeric, is an example of invoking “narrative.” What I’m saying is that there are real, non-quantifiable variables in the outcome of a baseball game. Judging managerial performance shouldn’t disregard that such variables exist. Judgements of managerial performance based entirely on quantitative values like win expectancy are often viewed as bullet proof, but they are not. There is a blind spot in statistical analysis.

            • Mister Delaware

              “What I’m saying is that there are real, non-quantifiable variables in the outcome of a baseball game.”

              Then explain to us how often a single run has a calming, winning effect and why it doesn’t when it doesn’t.

              • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                That is a bizzarre response which has very little to do with the quote you pulled out of his post……if there’s any connection at all.

    • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com/ bexarama

      The most troubling thing with the increased popularity of advanced stats is that many of the managers fans and media who use them don’t have any sort of in depth understanding of how to apply them.

      You’re obviously the only one who knows, ZZ. Please enlighten us!!

  • Big Stein

    Devastating news to the dregs at No maas and lohud.

  • pete

    and I can’t think of a single manager who I’d rather have guiding the team.

    That. That’s all there is to it. Girardi likes to bunt, which is annoying. And sometimes it does feel like we lose games because of the relievers he has brought in, whereas fans’ immediately felt effect of vastly improved bullpen performance over the course of the season is much less palpable. But in his three years here I can only think of one move for which I could not think of a decent rationale – when he had Granderson bunt on 3-0 to get to Colin Curtis with a runner on first. One inexcusable move in 3 seasons is something I can tolerate, especially from a manager who is so good at maximizing bullpen production

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      “Girardi likes to bunt, which is annoying.”

      Yup. Even worse, most of them don’t know how to bunt. So if you’re gonna flash that sign, how about teaching the players to execute it? I know it sounds junenile, but it’s a fact: If these fuckers can’t bunt, don’t make them do it!

      “And sometimes it does feel like we lose games because of the relievers he has brought in”

      You mean we don’t? It’s just an illusion?

      “whereas fans’ immediately felt effect of vastly improved bullpen performance over the course of the season is much less palpable.”

      LMAO. Yeah, I felt the improvement of the bullpen. It happened when they taught one of the relievers to pitch like Kerry Wood. Oh wait, that was Kerry Wood himself arriving here!

      “But in his three years here I can only think of one move for which I could not think of a decent rationale – when he had Granderson bunt on 3-0 to get to Colin Curtis with a runner on first.”

      Okay……now even people who love Girardi will tell you you’re full of shit with this. Heck, Girardi may tell you himself.

      “especially from a manager who is so good at maximizing bullpen production”

      How the hell can you possibly know that he’s maximized their production?? They are very good pitchers anyway. Wouldn’t their playoff results be the best factor that measures this? How are his relievers doing in this series? I see three of them with ERA’s over 10.00!

      Truthfully, I could care less if Girardi is back next year or not. If he is, fine. But don’t live in fear that if he leaves, the organization will go down the tubes. That’s dillusional.

  • dan genovese

    just get lee,crawford and it wont matter who is managing ………….

    • http://twitter.com/cephster Ross in Jersey

      Why not throw in Pujols Werth and Price Fielder to come off the bench?

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        I also demand Halladay, Lincecum, King Felix, Tulowitski and Justin Upton.

        • Mister Delaware

          Tulo first and foremost. I needed someone to fill in my massive Grady Sizemore man-crush and Tulo did a more than admirable job.

  • pat

    If we are fortunate enough to reel off a few championships in a row I could see Girardi wanting to take on a new challenge and leaving for the Cubbies. As it is he;s a very loyal guy and I never thought he would leave the Yanks after they handed him the keys to the castle after being fired from his last job. Girardi doesn’t seem like the kind of guy to accept a job somewhere then use it as leverage for another job somewhere else (i.e. that guy from The Office and every college football coach).

    • Big Stein

      Because he’s young and because Yankee managers don’t last long, I think he manages the Yanks for another 6 years and then he moves on to Cardinals when Larussa retires and manages the Cards for 15 years and ending his career with one last run with the Cubs (like Piniella)

    • http://www.twitter.com/deanezag Zack

      Girardi doesn’t seem like the kind of guy to accept a job somewhere then use it as leverage for another job somewhere else

      You’re right, that’s his agent’s job.

      • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

        “Girardi doesn’t seem like the kind of guy to accept a job somewhere then use it as leverage for another job somewhere else”

        Right……it’s not like he ever did anything for leverage. It’s not like he accepted an offer to manage the Yankees, then interviewed with the Dodgers a day later.

    • vin

      “Girardi doesn’t seem like the kind of guy to accept a job somewhere then use it as leverage for another job somewhere else ”

      Jack Z style.

  • nathan

    I guess SI.com is really ganging up on the binder-thing.

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.c.....index.html

    Sheehan had a pretty strong article that Joe G doesnt know to interpret data in the binder.

    My thought when they setup the rotation was that they wanted Andy to face Lee and have Andy up for game 7. Sheehan seems to point out the sole reason for Hughes pitching in Arlington was his 15 innings of success.

    I highly doubt that was the rationale used for going with Hughes in game 2.

    Whatever happens tonight, we should leave it all on the field, no regrets. Have a good feeling about this game tonight.

    • CP

      From the article:

      Without going to video, I would have no idea if those four Berkman hits off Oliver were scalded or blooped.

      I’ve heard Girardi mention on a number of occasions that the data he has includes this type of information. Sheehan’s assumption is that the data Girardi is working with is simply “Lance Berkman is 4-for-8 against Darren Oliver” or “Hughes has a 0.00 ERA in 15IP in Texas”, when the reality might be quite different.

      Looking at Hughes, he’s been far better on the road this year than at home – regardless of whether it’s in Texas or somewhere else. Plus, starting him in Game 2 allows Pettitte to match up with Lee in game 3 and a potential game 7. Plus, there is a small sample size of success for Hughes in Texas. Add it up, and there’s really nothing wrong with starting Hughes in game 2.

      As for Berkman, who should have hit for him in that situation? Austin Kearns? No, thanks. I’ll take my chances with Berkman.

    • Mister Delaware

      That’s Sheehan hypothesizing. If you give Girardi any credit for understanding data, the first two reasons to throw Hughes in Game 2 would be avoiding him pitching at home (something like a 4:1 HR split) and putting Pettitte and Carsten on either side of AJ since they typically go deeper than Phil.

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      “My thought when they setup the rotation was that they wanted Andy to face Lee and have Andy up for game 7. Sheehan seems to point out the sole reason for Hughes pitching in Arlington was his 15 innings of success.”

      I have to agree with Girardi on this. Wanting Pettitte to face Lee is the smart thing to do. The way it is set up now, I am actually confident that the Yankees can win tonight, and have a shot at winning game 7. I’d have very little confidence in a Lee/Hughes game 7 matchup.

  • http://www.twitter.com/deanezag Zack

    I’ll have to call a radio show tomorrow and pass along this breaking news via my sources

  • http://twitter.com/cephster Ross in Jersey

    When Girardi makes some questionable moves it frustrates me as much as anyone. But his good qualities – managing health, keeping bullpen arms fresh and resistant to injury – are more important than any strategical decision he makes. I’d rather have everyone as healthy as possible, if it means scoring a few less runs because of his tendency to bunt… so be it. No one out there is a better manager than Joe, but there are a whole lot worse.

    Won’t stop me from whining about him, though :)

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Won’t stop me from whining about him, though

      That’s the Jersey in you, Ross.

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      “No one out there is a better manager than Joe, but there are a whole lot worse.”

      So he’s the best manager in the entire world?

  • dan l

    Girardi stinks and needs to go! He just does not have the ability to make in game decisions. He does a fine job at managing potential wins into losses.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Bo Corollary.

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      You’re not supposed to notice that. You are to get back in line, and acknowledge that he has no managerial flaws.

  • Gonzo

    As Keith Law put it, there is so much more to managing than the 27 outs. Placing the value of a manager based solely on those 27 is kind of silly (barring serious in-game negligence and/or idiocy). We have no idea how Joe G. handles the other parts of the job because it’s not done in front of a camera. Based on how the team is doing/has done, I would say it’s safe to assume he’s doing a bang-up job in those areas.

  • Hughesus Christo

    The dubious rumors had nothing to do with what the Yankees plan to do.

    • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com/ bexarama

      How hard did you cry in joy when you read those Incarcerated Bob Tweets?

      • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

        He might be right. He’s not the first person who has mentioned that Joe’s wife hates it here. And for the long term, it doesn’t matter what you want if you’re wife DOESN’T want to be somewhere.

  • George39

    BRING BACK JOE TORRE!!!!

  • farentheight

    I would rather Girardi standing on the steps with that binder than Torre napping on the bench.

  • TheZack

    Who the F cares. Dead Billy Martin could manage this team to the playoffs. That’s not the point. The point is how the manager deals with when he actually has to, you know manage.

    Girardi did pretty darn well last year in the playoffs. This year, “meh.” I’d certainly say that’s worthy of another go round.

    Girardi isn’t perfect, but neither was Torre. As long as he manages them to the WS every few years, who can really complain?

    • jack

      Joe Girardi is not good enough, and he made so many fatal mistakes.
      Yankees really needs a better manager.

  • jayorz128

    The binder only shows that he is a studious person who is always prepared for every game and every situation.