Oct
11

Yanks’ depth picked up the slack in ALDS

By

It's a team effort. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan)

One of my favorite baseball truisms is that your best players have to be your best players if you want to succeed in the postseason, and there’s no better example of that than the 2009 Yankees. Alex Rodriguez got big hit after big hit, CC Sabathia took the ball as often as possible and dominated each time out, and Mariano Rivera nailed down every win along the way. If a team’s best players aren’t doing what’s expected of them, it’s very difficult to win in a short series. Unless, of course, you’re talking about the 2010 Yankees.

The Yanks more than doubled up the Twins during their three game ALDS sweep, outscoring them 17-7 (10-3 after the fifth inning). Other than the first six or so innings of the first game, the series really wasn’t all that competitive, as the Bombers imposed their will on the Twinkies pretty much every step of the way. Surprisingly, they did that with minimum production from three key players: Derek Jeter, A-Rod, and Brett Gardner.

Jeter, the leadoff hitter and supposed spark plug for the lineup, reached base a total of four times in 14 trips to the plate, all on singles. His batting line was an uninteresting .286/.286/.286, and he never even reached third base, let alone score a run. In fact he only made it as far as second base twice, the first time on Curtis Granderson‘s bunt in Game Two, the other on a stolen base in Game Three. Jeter did single in the go-ahead run in the seventh inning of Game Two, but that was pretty much the extent of his offensive contribution during the series.

Gardner led the team in on-base percentage during the season (.383), but he only reached base a total of three times during the ALDS, picking up two singles and a walk in a dozen plate appearances. Both hits came in Game Two, the walk in Game One, and he stole just one base. So right there, you have the two key offensive cogs, the two guys that are supposed to get on base for the meat of the order, falling short of expectations.

More surprising than the lack of production out of Jeter and Gardner was A-Rod’s rather quiet series. He finished the season on a torrid hot streak (.306/.375/.649 with 12 homers in his last 28 starts), but  singled just three times and walked once in the ALDS, driving in the first Yankee run of Game Two with a sacrifice fly. That’s the only run he drove in during the series, and even though his mere presence in the batter’s box and on-deck circle changes the game, Alex certainly didn’t have the same impact in the ALDS that he did last year.

And you know what? None of that was a big deal. The Yankee lineup has no soft spots, so they were able to absorb the struggles of Jeter, Gardner, and A-Rod and not miss a beat. Granderson had five hits including a huge triple in Game One and a big double in Game Two. The designated hitter platoon of Marcus Thames and Lance Berkman combined to go 4-for-11 with a double, a walk, and two homers. Nick Swisher and Mark Teixeira put their subpar 2009 postseasons behind them and combined for a .320/.371/.680 batting line, and Robbie Cano picked up A-Rod with a .333 batting average and zero single strikeouts. When one guy struggled, two others picked up the slack.

Most teams would have been dead in the water if their leadoff hitter and cleanup man failed to produce, not to mention their top on-base guy and basestealer. The Yanks have tremendous offensive depth and a circular lineup that can hurt you one through nine, certainly strong enough to offset three poor performances in a five game series. At some point, hopefully soon, Jeter, A-Rod, and Gardner will get back to doing what they’re capable of, and that should scare the crap out of the rest of the league.

Categories : Offense, Playoffs
  • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

    I think it’s actually kind of funny that Alex hit just .273/.308/.273/.580 in this series – worse than the 2005 and 2007 ALDSes, which he got absolutely skewered for, and a ton worse than the 2004 ALCS, which it still seems like a good portion of the fanbase blames him (and Javy) for single-handedly – and nobody’s said anything about it. It’s almost like the awful pitching and the fact that no one else hit in those series was a bigger issue than just A-Rod!

    • Thomas

      YOU LIE!!!!

      The rest of the Yankees didn’t play well, because they were overly occupied giving A-Rod the Heimlich maneuver since he was repeatedly choking.

    • CBean

      Well it’d different now because A-Rod is a True YankeeTM, unlike before where he was a choker who only wanted to steal Yankee money.

      Javy, sadly, remains the least True Yankee ever.

      • Mike HC

        ha, yea. I still blame Javy for all that went wrong in 2003. I guess deep down I know there were other issues, but Javy was supposed to be an ace that year, and gave up a grand slam in game 7, so it is easy to pin the narrative blame on him.

        • Jon in CUO

          I tend to point the finger more at Torre for leaving in Weaver, but hey, hating on Javy is cool too.

          • Mike HC

            hahaha, I’m down to hate on Weaver too.

            Torre gets a pass for everything on my end. Four WS titles allows you to basically do whatever you want, in my book (and his book too).

          • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

            Lilly for Weaver……..blame the guy who stuck Torre with Weaver.

        • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

          1. I assume you mean 2004.
          2. That’s still really, really silly.

          • Mike HC

            Yea, 2004, my bad. 2003 was probably the year the Yanks decided to sign Pavano, so I have nightmares about that year too, although the Boone homer to keep the curse alive was almost good enough for me not to care about losing to the Marlins.

            And two, not sure why you think Javy does not deserve at least a large portion of the blame. And he didn’t exactly vindicate himself this year. To each their own though.

            • pete

              Javy’s 2010 and Javy’s 2004 were completely unrelated, though. He got injured in the 2nd half of 2004. This year, he was just gassed all year. Very few pitchers can pitch on a massive dip in velocity, and even the ones who do survive it (Mussina, Pettitte, for example), typically have to whether a year of mediocrity-to-suckitude.

              Javy contributed a lot in 2004, though, and he did hold the rotation together from May-July this year, when Hughes and AJ were shitting the bed in historic fashion. His net value to the team this year was minuscule, but he did contribute, at least, to the team’s stability over the course of the year.

              • Mike HC

                Javy’s 2010 and Javy’s 2004 were completely unrelated? Not in my mind. Those were the only two years he pitched for the Yanks. And both years went pretty horribly wrong from my perspective. Thus, my thoughts on Javy is that he blows and is a nightmare to root for. That is related on my end.

                • first time lawng time

                  2010 was not horrible from my persepctive. April and August-September were horrible, yes, but did you forget the May-July when he was arguably our best starter, just the victim of terrible run support? If you’re going to acknowledge the guy for the bad stuff, acknowledge him for the good, too.

                  Yes the trade did not work out as well as expected, but that doesn’t mean it was horrible. When you’ve got a rotation as good as ours, there is always someone pitching poorly, with 4 other guys to pick him up. If you’re going to say Vazquez was terrible in 2010, also say Hughes was and CC and Burnett.

                  The point of that last sentence is all 4 of our starters (Not including Pettitte) struggled at some point, however they also pitched well at other points, too.

                • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

                  Can we maybe wait until the 2010 season is over before we declare it “horribly wrong”?

                  • Mike HC

                    I obviously meant Javy’s 2010 went horribly wrong as I have made it clear multiple times that I didn’t want to continue this argument and just want to enjoy the great 2010 season so for. But the very mention of Javy’s name obviously brings up strong reactions from every Yankee fan.

              • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                Javy’s 2010 and Javy’s 2004 were completely unrelated, though.

                No they aren’t. They both end with, “get this guy the hell out of here!”
                It’s like a sequel to a movie that was bad to begin with!

            • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

              They signed Pavano after 2004.

              And why does Javy deserve “a large portion” of the blame? In Game 7, he came in with the bases loaded, already trailing, against a hitter who’d owned him all year. Who do you put more blame on for that series, Javy or Mo?

              • Mike HC

                Javy was supposed to be our ace. The fact that he couldn’t even be trusted to start a game was enough to pin blame on him. And then when he was given a chance in relief, he was terrible.

                CC is the team MVP this year in my book, because when an ace pitches like one, it has tremendous value. And when an ace pitches so horribly that he can’t even get a slot in the post season rotation, it can completely kill a season.

                Lets move on though. This team is playing great right now, and not even memories of Javy can bring me down.

                • first time lawng time

                  So, it’s Javy’s fault for the 2004 ALCS collapse?

                  Javy not being the ace is the reason for Mo’s 2 blown saves?
                  Javy not being the ace is the reason for the offense to stop hitting?
                  Javy not being the ace is the reason that other pitchers happened to give up runs?

                  Yeah, ok. I’m sorry, I don’t want to sound rude, but that makes absolutely no sense. None. Zero. Nada.

                  I would honestly like to know why you think Javy Vazquez is the reason why the Yankees lost the 2004 ALCS.

                • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                  “Javy was supposed to be our ace. The fact that he couldn’t even be trusted to start a game was enough to pin blame on him. And then when he was given a chance in relief, he was terrible.”

                  Hey look…….I thought it was a fine trade when it was made, but if you’re gonna take a young guy from the Montreal organization and pencil him in as your ace in New York, you had better prepare yourself for disappointment. “Here, kid……you will now be pitching in front of 50,000 more people at home than you did in Canada. Show us the way!”

                  • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                    Yeah, it was also attempted with Pedro Martinez, and look how that turned out.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      Damn……and I was going to say “not everyone is Pedro Martinez”, but I honestly didn’t think anyone would even attempt to go there.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      By your reasoning, no young pitcher that begins his career in a small market can be expected to become a success in a large market. Substantiate that. Show me all the examples of guys who failed going from small to larger markets, and then show me how you know that they failed because they went to larger markets.

                      And while you’re at it, explain how Pedro Martinez, Randy Johnson, CC Sabathia, and any number of others have managed to pull it off.

                      Is there some sort of mystical force-field surrounding small markets, or maybe just Montreal in particular, that leads you to believe good pitchers can’t go from there to larger markets and succeed? Because if so, then that’s some crazy shit.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      “By your reasoning, no young pitcher that begins his career in a small market can be expected to become a success in a large market.”

                      I did not say that at all. You’re making shit up. Expecting someone to be successful, and expecting them to be an ACE are two totally different things.

                      “Show me all the examples of guys who failed going from small to larger markets, and then show me how you know that they failed because they went to larger markets.”

                      You’re missing the point, but the Yankee organization alone is littered with pitchers who’s came from small markets and flopped. I don’t know how you want me to substantiate that as the reason, outside of going to these players’ houses and asking them why they stunk here.

                      “And while you’re at it, explain how Pedro Martinez, Randy Johnson, CC Sabathia, and any number of others have managed to pull it off.”

                      They were already legitimate aces. Javier Vazquez was not. He was a very good pitcher on a very bad team. I think you need to read my post again, because all I said was that it was asking alot of Vazquez to come to NY and be the ace of the staff.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      “I don’t know how you want me to substantiate that as the reason, outside of going to these players’ houses and asking them why they stunk here.”

                      So you’re making an argument for which you can provide no support, yet I’m the one who is “making shit up.”

                      You win this round.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      “So you’re making an argument for which you can provide no support, yet I’m the one who is “making shit up.””

                      Yes, you’re making shit up. I never said that a pitcher in a small market can’t be successful in a larger market. I do not know where you got that from, but it didn’t come from me.

                      And going off the topic, I don’t know how you’d like me to “support” the fact that for some pitchers, it’s touger pitching in New York than where they came from. I thought this was common knowledge. Even the Yankees are aware of this.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      I don’t want you to have to do anything of the sort. Like I said, you win this round. Your logic is unquestionable and your reasoning is impenetrable. (Also, this conversation totally sucks, I’m bowing out.)

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      “I don’t want you to have to do anything of the sort. Like I said, you win this round. Your logic is unquestionable and your reasoning is impenetrable. (Also, this conversation totally sucks, I’m bowing out.)”

                      Oh, I see. Instead of admitting that you misquoted me, it’s much easier to act like a condescending wise ass. Great.

                • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                  “CC is the team MVP this year in my book, because when an ace pitches like one, it has tremendous value.”

                  AGAIN, Javy Vazquez was never an ace. Being the best pitcher in a bad rotation doesn’t automatically make you an ace. The Yankees basically chose him over Schilling due to age, but Schilling is a real ace.

                  • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                    There was a little more to the Javy/Schilling transactions than you’re allowing for.

                    When you say “the Yankees basically chose him over Schilling due to age,” I’m picturing you bent over and talking out of your ass, Ace Ventura style.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      Of course there was more to it, but it all amounted to the Yankees choosing to make a run at Vazquez over Schilling. They felt that with Vazquez, they were trading quality young players for a quality pitcher in his prime that could flourish in the organization for years to come, as opposed to a guy like Schilling who was looking for one more day in the sun.
                      There is nothing wrong with that……it is smart. It just backfired in this case, that’s all.

                      This was their mindset heading into the offseason.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      I’m not even going to bother – someone else can pick up the slack here if they see fit – but there was a LOT more to that decision than just the Yanks choosing the younger player. The price on Schilling was, reportedly, exorbitant. You’re way oversimplifying things and really missing much of the circumstances and context.

                    • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

                      I obviously wasn’t at the trade meetings or anything like that, but wasn’t it a case of Arizona was asking for a ton from the Yankees, and not much from Boston?

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      You’re way oversimplifying things and really missing much of the circumstances and context.

                      It’s what chris c. has been doing for years now. It’s his thing.

                    • Ed

                      To understand that trade, first go back to the previous offseason.

                      Arizona was about to sign David Wells. Wells had verbally agreed to a contract and just needed to sign it. Steinbrenner swooped in and offered Wells a contract, which was accepted. Arizona was furious at the Yankees.

                      A year later, Arizona was still mad. As a result, they would only trade Schilling to the Yankees if they got a ridiculous package in return. Their demands from the Yankees were Alfonso Soriano, Nick Johnson, and multiple B prospects. The Red Sox ended up getting Schilling for Casey Fossum and a couple relief prospects.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      “I’m not even going to bother – someone else can pick up the slack here if they see fit – but there was a LOT more to that decision than just the Yanks choosing the younger player.”

                      Age was the main reason. They felt the cost for Schilling was way too high in both players, and his contract cost. If he was younger, they would have considered overpaying for him. They were in cost-cutting mode at that time, and were also trying to unload bums like Mondesi, while spending on Sheffield. With Vazquez, the cost in players was more reasonable, his contract was managable over the next two seasons, and he was only 26 years old. They also didn’t try for Colon for the same reasons…….cost was too much in players and salary.
                      If Schilling was in his prime, he’d have been in pinstripes. But the guy was 37. That was the main problem.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      That’s fine, but it’s a far cry from your statement that “the Yankees basically chose him over Schilling due to age.” It was age combined with a lot of other factors, not the least of which was the exorbitant price demanded by the D’Backs.

                      IIRC, the Yanks wanted Schilling, and would have acquired him for a fair package. The D’Backs didn’t allow them to offer a fair package, though, as described in comments above. That’s why the deal didn’t get done.

              • first time lawng time

                Thankyou, Bex. You are the first person I have ever met that does not believe Javy is the main culprit of the 2004 ALCS.

                • Mike HC

                  You have obviously not read this blog long enough. Tons of readers are Javy apologists.

                • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

                  Well that’s because it was obviously A-Rod! ;)

                  I know thinking in non-absolutes isn’t exactly terribly popular but there’s not any one person to blame in that series, or pretty much any series a team loses. Seriously.

                  • first time lawng time

                    Exactly. That’s what I’m trying to say. Everybody contributed to the losses. They had 4 oppurtunities to win. Mo, takes the blame in 2 of the losses, the offense takes the blame in some of those losses, and other pitchers take the blame in other losses.

                    Oh and fun fact: Javy didn’t even pitch in every one of those final 4 games of that series. Also, he got the win in one of the games. Why doesn’t anyone acknowledge that?

                    (Yes I am aware that it’s a stupid stat but still).

                • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                  Thankyou, Bex. You are the first person I have ever met that does not believe Javy is the main culprit of the 2004 ALCS.

                  There was no “main culprit”.
                  If you actually watched that series, there wasn’t a single guy you could single out as having done more damage than anyone else. From games 4-7, they all sucked.
                  If Mariano closes out game 4, then AROD is not flying around the internet wearing a purse, and Vazquez isn’t clinching game 7 for Boston.
                  They were all to blame.

                  • first time lawng time

                    I know. My point was that everybody says that there is “one main culprit” and that culprit is Vazquez. That’s untrue and those people who think that are morons. What I was trying to say that the loss was a team effort and cannot solely be blames on Vazquez.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      I agree with you 100%. And why the heck has there been ZERO mention of Kevin Brown? Isn’t he the one who dug the Game 7 hole?

                    • first time lawng time

                      I agree. He is also the guy who punched a wall and either pitched while injured or couldn’t pitch at all.

                      I know something like that happened but IDK the details, so I could be completely wrong. Correct me if I am.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      “I know something like that happened but IDK the details, so I could be completely wrong. Correct me if I am.”

                      Nope you’re right. Brown was a swell guy.

            • first time lawng time

              …you do know that Rivera had 2 blown saves in the ALCS right? 3 outs away from going to the WS and he gives up the tying runs.

              But that’s OK, you can blame the guy that gave up a grand slam after somebody else loaded the bases, in a game in which the Yankees lost by 7 runs anyway, so those 4 runs didn’t make that much of a difference.

              Personally, I think wins and losses are a team effort, but if you’re going to blame someone for the 2004 ALCS collapse, it makes more sense to put the blame on Rivera not Vazquez.
              Note: I’m not saying Rivera should get all of the blame, just saying it makes more sense to blame him than Vazquez

              • Mike HC

                As I wrote above, it is not only the fact he pitched terrible in game 7. It is the fact that our supposed ace of the staff, or number two I guess, pitched so horribly that he couldn’t even get a spot in the rotation.

                We were relying heavily on Javy that year, and he was at best non existent, and at worst, a big reason why we lost the biggest game of our year.

                And guys like Mo, and Torre get a pass when you already have 4 rings and have already contributed so much excitement and production in years past for myself and other fans.

                Javy basically only brought misery.

                • first time lawng time

                  No. Mo deserves blame, regardless of how many rings he has. His job is a closer. He was supposed to get the final 3 outs in the 9th innings, but he didn’t. He didn’t do his job. It happens, nobody is perfect. He made some mistakes and should be acknowledged for that.

                  • Mike HC

                    Clearly it is a team game and so many different factors went into the ultimate conclusion to that year. Decisions made like a decade previous also factored in like draft picks throughout the 90’s and early 00’s and so much other stuff it is not even funny. It is pretty easy to say that any one thing was not the one and only reason.

                    But if you don’t think Javy was a relatively large reason the Yanks ended up losing the ALCS that year, I guess there is nothing left to say.

                    • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

                      And if you don’t think Mariano was a bigger reason, you’re not being objective at all. (I say this as a huge, huge, huge, huge Mariano Rivera fan.)

                    • first time lawng time

                      You still haven’t answered my question.

                      How is Javy Vazquez the “relatively large reason” the Yankees lost the 2004 ALCS. I do not want to hear anything about the 2004 season. We’re only focusing on the 2004 ALCS.

                    • Mike HC

                      I think I answered that already. The fact that our big off season trade, hyped up future ace, was not even trusted to start a game, is reason enough. The fact that he pitched so horribly during the season that the Yanks could not even count on him in the rotation. Then, when we had basically no other option but to go to Javy, he shit the bed again.

                      That is why. You can blame Mo if you want. I’m not looking to change your mind. Just trying to explain mine the best as I can.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      “How is Javy Vazquez the ‘relatively large reason’ the Yankees lost the 2004 ALCS?”

                      Well, he did pitch like 2 or 3 innings total, in one appearance, in the 4 losses. So I guess that’s a ‘relatively large’ reason the Yanks lost, if you’re comparing it against the effect Bob Sheppard had on those 4 losses. It’s all relative.

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      The fact that our big off season trade, hyped up future ace, was not even trusted to start a game, is reason enough.

                      He was hurt.

                      And Javy wasn’t the nominal ace of our 2004 team, that was Mike Mussina and/or Kevin Brown. Javy was never intended to start Games 1 or 2 of any series, whether he was healthy or not (and he wasn’t healthy).

                    • first time lawng time

                      The fact that he pitched so horribly during the season that the Yanks could not even count on him in the rotation. Then, when we had basically no other option but to go to Javy, he shit the bed again.

                      Just because “he wasn’t good enough for the starting roation” doesn’t mean it’s his fault the other starters didn’t do their jobs.

                      I have a question though, did Javy Vazquez load the bases himself? And if Javy got the out and didn’t give up a grand slam, Yankees still lose 6-4 (assuming the fallacy of the predetermined outcome), who do you blame then?

                    • Mike HC

                      Can you guys not grasp the concept that the very fact he didn’t start any of the games is a huge reason we lost. The fact that he was so terrible the Yanks could not trust him at all until they had no other choice. And, even in the very limited work he got in, he was completely horrible. Nail in the coffin.

                    • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                      “Can you guys not grasp the concept that the very fact he didn’t start any of the games is a huge reason we lost.”

                      We can grasp that you think that. What we can’t grasp is how/why people would hate the guy and blame him so disproportionately for the sin of being injured, when there were plenty of other players out on the field who could have won one of the 4 games they lost. Is Javy blameless? No, of course not. Is he to blame to the extent you think he is? No, of course not.

                      Should Braves fans hold a grudge for the rest of their lives against Chipper Jones for the sin of being injured and not playing in the 2010 postseason? Players get hurt, you can’t blame them for that.

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      Can you guys not grasp the concept that the very fact he didn’t start any of the games is a huge reason we lost.

                      Can you not grasp the fact Torre had to patch together a postseason rotation out of two healthy but mediocre pitchers (Mussina and Lieber) and three injured and ineffective pitchers (El Duque, Brown, and Javy) and he didn’t have any good options?

                      That he gave Javy an ALDS start and hoped and prayed that he’d somehow pitch through the pain and give him an opportunity to not start Brown or Hernandez, but Javy clearly wasn’t physically up to it so we rolled with the other two equally shitty options and lost that ALCS because we never had enough pitching to win 4 out of 7 games anyway?

                      Javy was hurt. Brown was hurt. Orlando was hurt. We had no options.

                    • first time lawng time

                      Can you guys not grasp the concept that the very fact he didn’t start any of the games is a huge reason we lost.

                      He was injured, that’s why he pitched poorly, that’s why he couldn’t start.

                      Is it his fault the other starters couldn’t get the job done? NO.

                      And, even in the very limited work he got in, he was completely horrible. Nail in the coffin.
                      2004 ALCS Game 3: WP: Javier Vazquez.
                      He was also mainly coming in to clean up other pitchers’ messes, such as Kevin Brown, and allowing those runners to score. Why not blame the pitchers who put the runners on in the first place?

                • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                  “As I wrote above, it is not only the fact he pitched terrible in game 7. It is the fact that our supposed ace of the staff, or number two I guess, pitched so horribly that he couldn’t even get a spot in the rotation.”

                  So if the Yankees get killed by Texas, you’re going to blame AJ Burnett? Like they shouldn’t beat Texas without him anyway?

                  • Mike HC

                    No, I will blame Javy again, because he was so terrible again to maybe not even be on the ALCS roster. hahah.

                    But, AJ has been terrible this year too. And if he can’t get a rotation spot, or pitches terribly when he does get on the mound, yes, AJ will be a large reason for the loss in my head. But, AJ has a WS ring, and has given me tons of entertainment and excitement, so he has built up a lot of goodwill already. Javy does not have that.

                    • first time lawng time

                      You’re just being irrational right now and being blind to the facts.

                      And if AJ pitches terribly on the mound, but the Yankees win, will you be upset at him?

                    • Mike HC

                      Ok, I give in.

                      Javy was one of the many reasons the Yanks ended up losing that year, none being particularity more prominent and/or blameworthy than any other reason.

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      Javy was one of the many reasons the Yanks ended up losing that year, none being particularity more prominent and/or blameworthy than any other reason.

                      Still not good enough, IMO.

                      He wasn’t “one of the many reasons we ended up losing that year”, he was one of the minor, relatively ancillary contributors to the loss.

                      Javy was the scapegoat. He’s a classic fall-guy.

                      He’s Scooter Libby.

                    • first time lawng time

                      He wasn’t “one of the many reasons we ended up losing that year”, he was one of the minor, relatively ancillary contributors to the loss.

                      I agree.

                      For the fun of it, let’s compare Javy Vazquez, the scapegoat, to Kevin Brown who gets little to no mention at all.

                      Kevin Brown 2004 ALCS:
                      0-1 ERA: 21.60 3.1 IP 8ER

                      Javy Vazquez 2004 ALCS:
                      1-0 ERA: 9.95 6.1 IP 7 ER

                      So while neither of them were great, Kevin Brown was worse and if anyone should be the scapegoat, not that anyone should though, Kevin Brown makes more sense of the two.

                    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                      “No, I will blame Javy again, because he was so terrible again to maybe not even be on the ALCS roster. hahah.”

                      No way. You cannot blame him this time around. This time the GM gets the blame.
                      Fool me once, shame on you.
                      Fool me twice, shame on me.

            • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

              And two, not sure why you think Javy does not deserve at least a large portion of the blame.

              Because
              A.) he didn’t start any of the 7 games
              B.) He only pitched 6.1 of the 69.2 innings of the series (9.0%)
              C.) Both of those relief appearances that comprised that 6.1 innings came in relief of Kevin Brown, whose 21.60 ALCS ERA makes Javy look like Bob Gibson in his prime
              D.) One of those two appearances was in Game 3; when he came in at the top of the 3rd, the deficit was 4-6, when he left after facing 3 batters in the 7th, the lead was 17-8, and we went on to win and take a 3-0 series lead
              E.) That means the only innings of consequence that he pitched were the 2 innings in Game 7, after Mo Rivera had already blown two potential series-ending saves
              F.) Brown and Vazquez pitched a combined 3.1 innings in Game 7 and left with a 1-8 deficit; 3 of those runs were charged to Javy and 5 of them were charged to Brown
              G.) Javy was pitching through injury for the entire second half and postseason of 2004.

              I’d say Javy deserves a small-to-medium-sized portion of the blame at best; far larger portions of the blame belong to Kevin Brown, Mariano Rivera, Tom Gordon, Joe Torre, and Derek Jeter (.200/.333/.233 in 30 PA).

              • first time lawng time

                But Mo, Jeter, and Torre had 4 rings at the time so their exempt form the blame, silly!

                • first time lawng time

                  meant to say they’re. Wow, can’t believe I made that mistake.

              • http://twitter.com/JoeRo23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                And, in addition, much of the blame that you can attribute to Javy should really be attributed to Javy’s injury, and it’s not really fair to blame the guy for being injured.

                (And, full disclosure, I’m not even a big Javy fan. This whole conversation is just ridiculous, though.)

                • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                  All of that too.

                  (And, full disclosure, I’m not even a big Javy fan. This whole conversation is just ridiculous, though.)

                  That. Whether you like Javy or not is irrelevant; the claim that he’s the main reason or the largest culprit in that collapse is nothing but lazy journalism run amok after the fact to fit a stupid narrative.

        • TapDancingTeddy

          That’s quite a lot of blame. Javy played for the Montreal Expos in 2003. No wonder Yanks fans hate him so much if he caused us to lose while not on our team or our opponents team!

    • Mike HC

      This is going nowhere. I didn’t want to get into a whole Javy debate. I just made a throwaway comment about Javy which started this whole thing.

      All is good in Yankeeland. Lets just enjoy this year.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Your throwaway comment sucked. If you didn’t want to get into a debate, you shouldn’t make sucky throwaway comments.

        • Mike HC

          hahaha. Believe me, I regret it.

          • Mike HC

            And, if you read the original comment again, I write, “I guess deep down I know there were other issues,” and also, “so it is easy to pin the narrative blame on him.”

            So I acknowledged all of your arguments before you even made them and admitted to exaggerating.

            • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

              Rather than preemptively admit to exaggerating and then proceed to exaggerate, why not just choose not to exaggerate in the first place?

              There’s that.

              • Mike HC

                There is that. But I don’t mind having an irrational opinion, or an emotional reaction even in the face of statistical evidence or rational thought that seems to show the opposite. Everything does not have to be so mechanical or thought out, in my opinion. Especially in sports. The entire concept of rooting for one team over another is kinda irrational.

                The thought of Javy, and that 2004 collapse go hand in hand in my head. He is the symbol for all that went wrong. Yea, I could lament every single thing that did not go the Yanks way, but it is easier to put one face on the totality of all that went wrong, and Javy is that guy for me. I know that many of you guys will ridicule that statement or laugh me off as retarded. Just speaking the truth though.

                • first time lawng time

                  Just speaking the truth though..

                  No, you’re not.

                  I understand (I think) that you’re saying it’s all in your head and you’re only blaming Javy because it’s easier for you and you know this is irrational.

                  What I am trying to do/say is convince you, get it through your head, that Javy Vazquez is not to blame for 2004. The 2004 New York Yankees are to blame for the 2004 ALCS collapse.

                  Fact: Javy Vazquez =/= the 2004 New York Yankees. He was merely 1/25 of that team. 1/25 of the reason for the collapse.

                  • Mike HC

                    Right, it is just in my head. Red Sox fans will have their own view of 2004. And Mets fan their own view. etc … Different Yankee fans will also have their own subjective view.

                    I don’t begrudge you guys from spreading the blame around more than I. Deep down in my bones, ha, Javy sorely sticks out as the most frustrating part of that season, thus, that is what I remember and what causes an emotional response when I think about it.

                    • first time lawng time

                      OK. I understand what you’re saying. It’s all psychological and that you know Javy isn’y solely the blame, but it’s easier for you to blame him, am I getting this correct?

                      I understand where you’re coming from: it’s human nature to blame someone we don’t like and give people we do like a “free pass”. But you really should not think like this in this scenario. It just makes you sound irrational. I understand that you don’t like the guy, but please, just read the facts and try to understand this:
                      Javy Vazquez is not the person to blame for 2004. It was a team effort!!!

                      I’m sorry, but there is absolutely zero evidence to pinpoint or even make a logical assumption that requires Javier Vazquez to be the scapegoat. I just don’t see it.

                    • Mike HC

                      I get it. There is no one reason or person to blame. There are many reasons we lost and trying to single one out as the “main reason” is a foolhardy task. Believe me, I get it.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            Fair enough.

            You should also regret the intensity of your irrational hatred of Javy Vazquez, because you’re blowing it way out of proportion.

            • Mike HC

              I’m sitting here listening to Tom Petty right now, deciding whether or not I want to drive back to long island to play football today or just continuing being lazy and laughing at the craziness of this whole conversation.

              I don’t like Javy the baseball player because the two years he played for my team, he did not pitch well. It is really that simple. Everything else that is extrapolated from that is really just bs to try to explain myself which I am not doing a good job obviously.

              • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                I don’t like Javy the baseball player because the two years he played for my team, he did not pitch well. I

                That’s fine; nobody is asking you to stop doing that.

                What we’re asking you to do is to stop inventing your own historical record to make it convenient to blame the team’s collapse on your least favorite player and absolve blame from your more favorite players.

                I’ll never begrudge you of your right to have Javier Vazquez with every inch of your being. What I don’t like is you obscuring what actually happened and inventing your own facts.

                You’re entitled to your opinions; you’re not entitled you your own facts. Nobody is.

                • Mike HC

                  Assigning blame for the 2004 season is a subjective thing.

                  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                    Within bounds of normal reason, yes. You are far beyond those bounds of reason.

                    The historical record of what happened does not agree with your emotional assertion that he was most to blame (or even among those most to blame, for that matter). You are in disagreement with the facts.

                    • Mike HC

                      I’m not about to start doing tons a research here, but I’m sure the Yanks passed up on multiple all stars throughout the drafts. So, if we had drafted an all star pitcher rather than a scrub in 2000 lets say, the Yanks would have had another ace and would have won the series. Thus, the GM at the time was at fault.

                      Assigning blame for something as complex as this is not as easy as you make it seem.

                    • first time lawng time

                      You can’t think back to 2000 and make crazy assumptions about what would have happened with the drafts and all of the nonsense. Please, just hear me out. These are SOME of the reasons they lost the 2004 ALCS (off the top of my head):

                      1. Mo had 2 blown saves
                      2. The Yankees couldn’t score in extra innings in those blown saves
                      3. The starting pitchers couldn’t get the jobs done in the later games
                      4. INJURIES
                      5. Yankees offense had issues
                      6. Bullpen implosions.

                      Notice how none of those points (except number 1) have a specific name involved? I guess that means, there is no one person to blame, and that it was, in fact, a team effort.

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      And if you want to argue that Cashman was the main culprit of that 2004 collapse, you’d have a logical leg to stand on (as you just illustrated).

                      You have no logical leg to stand on to make the claim that Javy was the main culprit. None.

                    • Mike HC

                      But, decisions that were made in 2000 (and other years as well) surely had an impact on the 2004 season. So ignoring that is also leaving out a large part of the blame equation.

                    • first time lawng time

                      And if you want to argue that Cashman was the main culprit of that 2004 collapse, you’d have a logical leg to stand on (as you just illustrated).

                      Ehhh, I’m sorry, but this doesn’t seem logical to me. The Yankees had 4 oppurtnuties to win 1 game. They didn’t. The players failed and couldn’t get the job done.
                      Cashman got players who were clearly good enough to make it to a game 4 in the ALCS while being up 3-0. They just didn’t get the job done.

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      I’m not saying it’s a persuasive winning argument, just one that has a factual basis from which a sound argument can be made.

                      The Javy one cannot.

                    • first time lawng time

                      Oh ok, I see what you’re saying now.

      • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

        “This is going nowhere. I didn’t want to get into a whole Javy debate. I just made a throwaway comment about Javy which started this whole thing.”

        Mike, I get what you’re trying to say……that Javy’s bad season caused the YAnkees to get help slsewhere which hurt the team, but once it got to that point in the playoffs, you can’t really assess more blame to Vazquez than everyone else for the loss.
        So let’s say you figure if Vazquez had a good season, he’d have been the #2 starter in the playoffs. Well, instead, that spot was taken by Jon Lieber, who was outstanding against the Sox in game two. I think it took them 7 innings until they hit him. Can’t imagine Vazquez at his best would have done better than Lieber there.
        But in reality, by the time Vazquez had a chance to contribute in that series, the damage was already done.

  • JerseyDutch

    If I remember correctly, ARod followed up a stellar ADLS and ACLS with a somewhat subdued WS performance last year. Let’s hope he’s reversing the trend for this year.

    • http://nyystadiuminsider.com nick

      HE had a .973 OPS in the World series with 6 RBI, and probably the two biggest hits in the series.

      • JerseyDutch

        I knew my memory was going…

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      “If I remember correctly, ARod followed up a stellar ADLS and ACLS with a somewhat subdued WS performance last year. Let’s hope he’s reversing the trend for this year.”

      There is no trend.
      Just small sample sizes of pure chance.

  • TOMACONDA

    Wood and Thames have been great pickups for two players that most fans did not have high expectations of.

  • CS Yankee

    Jeter seemed to have solid AB’s in this series though and Arod was pressing a bit. However, the bigger concern was if Jeter’s year would continue in the postseason and it was good seeing him reclaim his bat (although it doesn’t show stat wise).

    Swish this postseason is 3000% better than last year, Teix is smoking the ball & I believe Arod will play big in the upcoming weeks.

    The SP is making MSM scratch their heads…a good thing when your worse pitcher is CC, and he is still hanging in there while notching a tough W.

  • http://twitter.com/firstheart42 seimiya

    DEEP AND THICK.

  • pat

    CC looks like he’s been imposing his will on Twinkies since a very young age.

    • RalphieD

      HOF worthy comment

    • http://twitter.com/firstheart42 seimiya

      Win.

  • pete

    Is there any team with as much power out of 2B and CF as the Yankees have? There’s a pretty decent chance they get a combined 60+ HRs out of that duo next year

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      The Phillies?

      50 HR out of Utley, and 10 HR out of Victorino?

      http://www.instantrimshot.com

  • V

    What I noticed, comparing Jeter vs. ARod, is Jeter was putting together good AB after good AB, and had several loud outs, whereas at times, ARod just looked lost up there, swinging at garbage pitches, etc.

    • Mike HC

      Regarding Jeters good at bats. I had the same reaction as you at first. He lined out to right center a couple of times and hit the ball well. But, everyone knows that Jeter is going to hit the ball there. So even though he hit the ball hard, it is not exactly unlucky that he hit it right at guys. They know he is going to hit it there. I don’t really have a point, just throwing out my thought process on whether I consider those hard hit balls as positives or not, ha.

  • RL

    The designated hitter platoon of Marcus Thames and Lance Berkman combined to go 4-for-11 with a double, a walk, and two homers.

    This, to me, was the biggest difference in the games. Berkman and Thames were awesome and I hope they keep it up, while the rest of the Yankees do what’s expected of them. Thames was perhaps the best addition to the team this year. Berkman is adding value adn Wood has been great so far.

  • Dream of Electric Sheep/ still haven’t register /too lazy

    I hope Nunez replace Pena in the next round , even more depth in speed !

    • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

      The difference between them is negligible. I’ll take Pena ’cause he can at least play defense.

      • vin

        This. If, Mo-Forbid, an IFer goes down with an injury, then Nunez should get the call. But that’s the only circumstance.

      • Dream of Electric Sheep/ still haven’t register /too lazy

        It is negligible , but for the sake an argument. The chance of needing a base stealer seem to be greater than the chance needing Pena to play D and one of IFer goes down in the playoff.

        That’s my logic.

  • Mike HC

    Jeter played flawless D though, which is almost more important for this Yankee team. The Yanks have hit just fine all year with Jeter struggling and clearly have enough firepower to do just fine with a mediocre hitting Jeter. His D is the key, and he was perfect in the ALDS.

    Gardner too really. His D is more important than his offense.

    • Mike HC

      Also, I don’t have the numbers, but it seemed like Gardner still saw a lot of pitches and worked the count a lot, bringing pitch counts up and wearing pitchers down.

    • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

      Gardner too really. His D is more important than his offense.

      There is nothing wrong with the offense of a guy who reaches base over 38% of the time and leads the league in annoying the shit out of pitchers both at the plate, and on the bases.

  • Yank the Frank

    The ALDS showed how well rounded this team is and can beat you in a lot of different ways. The Yankees are now playing the way they did pre-September which should bode well for the next round. It’s a lot of fun watching this team play when it is playing on all cylinders.

    • Mike HC

      Yea. They seem unbeatable when they are playing like this. If we can get great pitching and defense, nobody has a shot.

  • james

    This is perhaps the dumbest blog post that I’ve seen all year from RAB. The author cites solid statistics, and then just attempts to spin them into sub-par performances. Gardner lead the team in OBP but reached base only three times? Um, well, he only had about 10-11 at bats, genius. And he also had a huge sac fly in one of his other at bats. So, if anything, OBP belies his true contribution to the ALDS victory.

    Jeter only hit .286? Since when is that something to scoff at? It is not that he “was not one of the best players” during the series in the traditional sense, merely that other talented players played well above-and-beyond their abilities. Please stop grasping for straws in this long break period.

    • Andy In Sunny Daytona

      Can you change your name to “Big Game James”?

      • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

        That would violate the First Name Only Male Handle Rule, which james here certainly seems to uphold.

        • Andy In Sunny Daytona

          I was just thinking that his comment sucks as much as James Shields does.

        • Slugger27

          i missed this “rule”

          what is it

          • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

            A majority of users whose usernames are JUST first names, and they’re male names, are batshit crazy and say silly things.

            There are exceptions.

            • http://www.facebook.com/dougchu Doug

              HEY I RESEMBLE THAT REMARK

          • first time lawng time

            People whose handles are only a male first name say irrational things.

    • http://twitter.com/cephster Ross in Jersey

      I think you missed the point of the article, friend.

      Mike was not trying to belittle the performances of Jeter or Gardner. He was merely pointing out that there were different players picking up big hits in each game. The lineup had different guys stepping up every night, and some of them – like Berkman, Granderson, etc – were guys who didn’t carry the team as much as A-rod or Cano did during the year. It’s a good thing.

    • http://mystiqueandaura.com Steve H

      Hitting .286 is nothing to scoff at. Hitting .286/.286/.286 is terrible.

      And Gardner’s sac fly is a flyout in which he was lucky one of his teammates got on base in front of him. If not for his teammates contribution, it’s a flyout.

      • http://nyystadiuminsider.com nick

        Looking at rate stats like that in a short series the Yankees dominated is foolish.

        • http://mystiqueandaura.com Steve H

          james was looking at a rate stat of his .286 average as nothing to scoff at. That is the emptiest .286 you can possibly hit. Do I think Jeter sucks because he didn’t have a great 3 games? Of course not. But to say that because he hit .286 he had a good series is just wrong.

          • Januz

            It will be very interesting to see what Jeter’s new contract will be if the best case scenario occurs, which would be the Yankees defeat the Phillies, who are clearly the clear NL team in the Series, while Jeter has a post-season that is similiar to his regular season. Would they be willing to make the tough decision to give him a 1 year contract?

            • Slugger27

              “clearly the clear”

              love it.

      • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

        “And Gardner’s sac fly is a flyout in which he was lucky one of his teammates got on base in front of him. If not for his teammates contribution, it’s a flyout.”

        This is just goofy on so many levels.

        • http://mystiqueandaura.com Steve H

          Really? If no one was on 3rd base, what would Gardner’s flyball have turned into?

          • larryf

            productive out>>>>>>>strikeout

            • http://mystiqueandaura.com Steve H

              His flyout is only deemed productive because his teammate got on 3rd base.

          • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

            “Really? If no one was on 3rd base, what would Gardner’s flyball have turned into?”

            Don’t you think Gardner was aware that there was a man on third with less than two outs before he stepped up to the plate? Major league players know the situations. Maybe he was looking to drive one to the outfield knowing that at worst, it would result in a run.
            I mean, how often does Gardner hit fly balls deep enough to score a run? Not often. But he did it there.

            I love how when Jeter grounds out to 2nd but moves a runner over, it was a strategic sound fundamental move, but when other players hit Sac flies, they’re just flat out lucky.

            • http://mystiqueandaura.com Steve H

              So if there wasn’t a runner on third, he would have tried getting a hit. Hit>>>>SF

              • Hughesus Christo

                The idea of “productive outs” is that a major leaguer should be able to intentionally launch a deep-ish fly ball at a much higher rate than they would get a hit. Come on, man.

              • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                Gardner was clearly trying to drive something in that at bat. You could tell by his swing. In at-bats with nobody on base, he’s more of a slap hitter.
                Again, how often does Gardner hit a drive to the outfield deep enough for a runner to tag from third? Rarely. And almost never when the bases are empty.
                This does not mean he wasn’t trying to get a hit. It just means he wanted to get the ball out of the infield.

            • Hughesus Christo

              Sometimes people get so wrapped up in sabr that they get forest/trees’d on stuff like that. I don’t know how to address it without getting insulting, but I don’t think even Bill James himself would make a statement like that because he understands the intent of the analysis isn’t just to promote it for its own sake. Situation, player, eyes, and everything else points to Gardner trying to get a sac fly in that spot. To cll it “lucky” is ridiculous.

              • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

                Why wouldn’t Gardner try to get a hit in that situation? Then not only do you have the run in, there’s another runner on base without any outs made.

                • first time lawng time

                  Maybe, he’s trying to say that it’s liklier to hit a deep fly ball than to get an actual hit?

                  IDK.

                • Hughesus Christo

                  You can argue with the preferred outcomes there, but I don’t think you can argue with the idea that a major leaguer can “go for” any kind of flyball at a higher rate than they can “go for” a base hit. You also need to consider the return on pushing the lead from 4 to 5 versus that team with the Yankees’ pitching.

                • http://www.paychex.com chris c.

                  “Why wouldn’t Gardner try to get a hit in that situation?”

                  Who said he wasn’t? Trying to drive the ball out of the infield means you’re not trying to get a hit??

    • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

      merely that other talented players played well

      That’s the point of the article.

    • pete

      “the dumbest blog post that I’ve seen all year from RAB”

      that’s like saying “that was the dumbest lecture Einstein ever gave”

      Nonetheless, I’ll address your issues with the article, bullet point-style

      Gardner lead the team in OBP but reached base only three times? Um, well, he only had about 10-11 at bats, genius.

      Lazy. The line you cited is followed immediately by the words in a dozen plate appearances. His OBP was a hideously terrible .250. Does that say anything, in a 3 game sample, about the caliber of player Gardner is? No, of course not, and it doesn’t attempt to. But it says he had a pretty shitty offensive series, because he did. Which is fine, because – and this is important – other players did have good offensive series.

      And he also had a huge sac fly in one of his other at bats.

      First off, it wasn’t a “huge” sac fly. It was, as far as playoff RBIs go, a pretty standard sac fly. And while it was a successful at-bat, it was about as unsuccessful as a successful AB can be. In other words, it was a successful AB because the standards of success had been lowered because of the opportunities created by his teammates. Nothing to knock him for, of course, but nothing to write home about either.

      Jeter only hit .286? Since when is that something to scoff at?

      Since when is hitting .286/.286/.286 not something to scoff at? Again, nobody is saying that these players are shitty or condemnable because of their series. We’re just saying that they had bad series and the rest of the team overcame their performances because we have a deep team.

  • vin

    Honestly, part of the reason it seems like everyone had good ABs (whether the #’s bear it out or not) is because of the Twins’ starters.

    Liriano was mowing threw the lineup until he began to tire. He got a few pitches up and/or over the plate and the Yankee hitters cashed in. Pavano has a decent arsenal, but he relies on contact which is a bad formula for a team with so much talent and power. And Duensing was mostly awful – throwing plenty of hittable pitches.

    The Twins lost because their starters just weren’t good enough, while the Yankee starters dominated their lineup.

  • Terry_G

    That’s why a team needs depth. Not all players will be hitting at the same time. Granderson and Tex this series, perhaps A-Rod and Jeter next. That’s how we beat the Twins.

    The poll over at TwinkieLand asking Are The Yankees Good for Baseball has taken a turn against the Yankees. Go lend your support to our team and vote:

    http://www.twinkietown.com/201.....r-baseball

    • nsalem

      I read the article and the first few comments. It seemed fair and balanced (no pun intended to me) and I didn’t feel like the author was attacking the Yankees. I think that he left out at least two key points a) The Twins are no longer a small market team.
      b) Mr Steinbrenner did not just start spending money in the mid 90’s. Plenty of money was also spent by the Yankees in the 1980’s also but unwisely and without positive results. The seeds of our Yankee dynasty was planted with great draft picks, great scouting and great trades. We are still reaping the benefits almost 20 years later. Thank you Gene Michael.

    • Hughesus Christo

      Not even worth our time. If the Twins had more than one “really good” pitcher, they would have had a better chance.

      Even Volquez/Arroyo/Cueto would be tougher on the Yankees. What I’m seeing is a fanbase made delusional about its roster because they spent more money for once and got a new stadium.

  • larryf

    There is no “I” in Yankee.

    /Next thread please

    • Tom Swift

      But there is in “yanqui.”

      • larryf

        well played….