May
19

Robinson Cano, hacker extraordinaire

By

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

“I just told Kevin [Long] I’m just going to keep swinging. I’m not going to take pitches or anything like that … I’m just going to go up there and do my thing.”

That’s what Robinson Cano told Kim Jones on the field immediately after last night’s game ended, referring to his 15th inning at-bat that resulted in a two-run, go-ahead double on Mike Gonzalez’s first pitch of the game, a 95 mph fastball left right out over the plate. Cano’s been doing a whole lot of swinging at the first pitch this season, with 38 of his 169 plate appearances (22.5%) resulting in a first pitch ball in play. Last year that number was 15.5%, for some perspective.

Robbie’s never been a patient hitter, but last season he saw a career high 3.47 pitches per plate appearance en route to a career high in just about every offensive category, including unintentional walk rate and OBP. This year he’s seen just 3.16 (!!!) pitches per plate appearance, which ranks 191st out of 192 qualified batters. Orlando Cabrera (2.96 P/PA) is the only one worse. Cano’s career worst was 3.05 pitches per plate appearance back in 2005, his rookie year, and he was never lower than 3.35 P/PA from 2007 through 2010. That isn’t that good either (would rank 184th out of 192 this season), but it’s better than what he’s done this year.

Jack Curry reported on Tuesday that Long had a “heart to heart” talk with Robinson on Monday about being more selective at the plate, primarily because pitchers just aren’t throwing him many strikes. Just 41.6% of the pitches he’s seen this year have been in the strike zone, the 21st fewest among those 192 qualified batters and the fewest of Cano’s career. Last year just 43% of the pitches he saw were in the zone, but the difference is that he’s hacked at 41.7% of the pitches he’s seen out of the zone in 2011 compared 36.5% last year and 32.6% for his career. Only seven batters have swung at more pitches out of the zone this season. Since the talk with Long, Cano has seen a total of 35 pitches in 14 plate appearances, or 2.5 per.

Robinson is never going to draw a ton of walks or be an elite OBP guy (last year’s .385 mark was fueled by .319 AVG and 11 intentional walks), but his discipline has cratered to levels usually reserved for the hackiest of hacks. That he’s still hitting .287/.325/.522 is a testament to his ability to make hard contact and get the bat on the ball wherever it’s pitched. But this kind of extreme plate indiscipline only works so much, the league is already aware that Cano’s swinging at so many pitches out of the zone and is only going to keep more and more pitches off the plate. Matt Wieters set up off away and off the plate in that 15th inning at-bat last night, Gonzalez just missed his spot and gave Robbie something to hit. It wasn’t by design.

As I harp on Cano’s plate discipline, I just make sure it’s clear that I’m not doing so because I want to see him walk more. That would be nice, don’t get me wrong, but the ultimate goal behind working the count is to get a good pitch to hit. It seems like Robinson needs to be reminded that just because a pitch is in the zone, it doesn’t mean it’s worth swinging at. He’s swinging at the first pitch essentially 25% of the time, and is the best pitch to hit the first one in one out of every four trips to the plate? I dunno, maybe it is, but it doesn’t seem likely, not when they’re only throwing him a strike on four out of every ten pitches. Swinging at so many pitches out of the zone, especially early in the count, just puts the pitcher in control.

Categories : Offense

73 Comments»

  1. As you adequately put, the problem is choice. But we already know what you are going to do, don’t we? Already I can see the chain reaction: the chemical precursors that signal the onset of an emotion, designed specifically to overwhelm logic and reason. An emotion that is already blinding you to the simple and obvious truth: you are going to swing at that first pitch and there is nothing you can do to stop it. Hope. It is the quintessential human delusion, simultaneously the source of your greatest strength, and your greatest weakness.

  2. Barry says:

    The problem is sometimes the reverse happens with him, he comes up to the plate so locked in to take a pitch, that you can see he’s taking and the pitcher can just throw it down the middle.

    • Soam says:

      Cano is a great hitter, I want him to trust his instincts at the plate and to feel free to swing. There’s no need for Long, or anyone to overreact to a small sample size. He’s got a .346 career obp, and his current obp is .326, that will correct itself over the course of the season. Leave Cano alone.

      • Ted Nelson says:

        That he’s a great hitter doesn’t mean there’s no room to coach him…

        • Steve H says:

          Yeah, he’s a great but flawed hitter who has obvious room for improvement.

        • MikeD says:

          Mickey Rivers disagrees.

          “You can’t improve what’s bad, you can only build up what’s good.”

          • Ted Nelson says:

            I’m confused… Why is Mickey Rivers the ultimate authority on the subject? Why can’t Cano do something that he literally did just last season? The article wasn’t asking Cano to become Gardner as far as I could tell, just to become the best Cano he can be.

      • Clay Bellinger says:

        It’s not that it’s a huge issue, it’s just that if pitchers are just going to avoid throwing him strikes knowing that he’s gonna swing anyway, he just won’t get nice pitches to hit.

      • pete says:

        He is way too talented to ever be satisfied with a .346 OBP. As he’s showed the last two years, he’s capable of being a .360+ OBP guy, which, mixed with his solid defense and consistent .500+ SLG, makes him an elite player, rather than simply a “good” player. A player with elite talent should never be content to play at anything less than an elite level.

  3. Ted Nelson says:

    Good analysis.

  4. Greg Corcoran says:

    He’s seeing approximately 3 pitches per at bat. So it would stand to reason that the best pitch to hit would be the first pitch in 1/3 of at bats, which is more than the 1/4 of at bats you scoffed at and said was unlikely. It may be even more than 1/3 because pitchers are trying to get a strike with that first pitch since the hitter is less likely to swing, and that pitch sets the tone for the at bat.

    • Clay Bellinger says:

      The point is not that he’s not swinging at the best pitch he’s seeing, it’s that he often may not even get to the best pitch of his ABs. The best pitch may be the 4th or 5th pitch after he’s worked his way into a 3-1 count.

      • Greg Corcoran says:

        Right, but it still should be the best pitch he sees at least 1/4 of the time even if he saw 4 pitches per at bat, which I doubt if he’ll ever do. Personally, I want Robinson Cano swinging at the best pitch he sees, regardless of whether it’s the first or last pitch. He’s a born hitter. The point is, swinging at the first pitch is not a bad thing. I don’t understand when it became such blasphemy to swing at the first pitch. Honestly, I found it annoying how Bobby Abreu refused to swing at the first pitch, because a lot of times it would be a grooved fastball he could have taken for a ride.

  5. Matt says:

    Cano is the new Vlad Guerrero.

  6. V says:

    This failure to listen to his hitting coach is a big WARNING SIGN that he’s not going to age well. Enjoy his peak while it lasts, but for the love of whatever deity you follow, do NOT SIGN HIM TO A LIFETIME CONTRACT.

    • Clay Bellinger says:

      “do NOT SIGN HIM TO A LIFETIME CONTRACT.”

      I see what you’re saying, but this should go for just about everyone. It’s almost always regrettable.

    • David, Jr. says:

      Agree re a lifetime contract, but disagree that he is showing signs that he won’t age well. He has had a consistently improving career line to where he will contend for major AL hitting awards. It is a huge mistake to react too strongly to a period of less selectivity. They have many issues, and he isn’t remotely one of them.

      • thumpher says:

        His ability to age well really has nothing to do with somehow being labelled as “uncoachable.” However, he won’t age as well because as his bat speed slows down, he won’t be able to catch up to those pitches out of the strike zone or those strikes that just aren’t good pitches to hit.

        As it stands now, his approach at the plate isn’t going to lead to sustained offensive production when he hits his 30s. (I’m not saying he can’t change though)

        • Ted Nelson says:

          I don’t have the numbers as far as how many pitches he saw by season, but Vlad has always been considered a free swinger and he sustained his peak through his 32 or 33 year old season and is still a solid hitter through 36. Orlando Caberera has a similar OPS at 36 as he had at 25… it’s not that he hasn’t aged well, it’s just that with the exception of a couple of seasons he was never that productive a hitter to begin with. Cano is that productive year-in-year-out (with the 2008 exception).

          On the other hand, plenty of patient hitters don’t age well or hit a wall when their bat speed slows. This is no longer the steroid era, and guys (who are not taking steroids) will generally age earlier than in the recent past. You’re not very likely to see someone peaking at 39 like Barry Bonds did anymore.

          Vlad is an exceptional athlete/hitter, and I agree that as a general rule a patient hitter will age better. My point is just that being impatient does not necessarily tell us Cano will be done at 30.

          I would be comfortable with you saying that his approach makes it more likely he won’t sustain his production into his 30s, but you absolutely cannot say definitively that he won’t with the same approach.

          • thumpher says:

            Yeah, you hit the nail of the head there. Vlad the Impaler is exceptional…the root being “exception.” Most players won’t age like him, and if I was a betting man, there’s a higher probability Robbie won’t either.

            Also, that was a wall of text for nit-picking such a minute point. When discussing signing Cano to a long term contract, I think his approach at the plate and skill set are far more important than his coachability. Squibbling over a definitely/likely/maybe/won’t semantics is…meh.

            • Ted Nelson says:

              “Yeah, you hit the nail of the head there. Vlad the Impaler is exceptional…the root being “exception.””

              Thanks for pointing that out… but, yeah, that was my point. Vlad may be an exception, but Cano may be an exception too. Cano is also exceptional and the root word there is also exception.

              “if I was a betting man, there’s a higher probability Robbie won’t either.”

              Again, this is my whole point. You didn’t talk about probability, you made a definitive statement: “As it stands now, his approach at the plate isn’t going to lead to sustained offensive production when he hits his 30s.”

              “Also, that was a wall of text for nit-picking such a minute point.”

              I disagreed with your entire comment. If it’s a minute point… why’d you leave the comment in the first place?

              ” When discussing signing Cano to a long term contract, I think his approach at the plate and skill set are far more important than his coachability.”

              And that approach does not necessarily mean he’ll age any worse than a more patient hitter. Just about every hitter is going to age, and just about any hitter who loses bat speed is going to get worse. Cano is already at a very high point, so in declining he should still be at a relatively high point compared to a lesser player. Like… wait for it… Vlad. That was my point. Take, though, another hacker like Orlando Cabrera. It’s not that he hasn’t aged well, it’s that he was never a good hitter. He had one good season and a few other solid ones, but he’s a career .315 wOBA hitter. That his wOBA at 35 and 36 is below that in the .290s… not a surprise regardless of his approach at the plate.

              “Squibbling over a definitely/likely/maybe/won’t semantics is…meh.”

              Again, not semantics. I disagree with the premise of your argument.

              • thumpher says:

                Uh dude, because no one is arguing whether Cano HAS to age a particular way or MOST LIKELY will age a particular way, etc. You’re being combative just for the sake of arguing. The commenters above didn’t want to explore a long term contract with Cano because he wasn’t coachable; I think its more prudent to be cautitious about a longterm contract because of his approach at the plate.

                • Ted Nelson says:

                  Uh dude, I read you comment and I disagreed with it. I am arguing because I disagree with you.

                  Now you’re claiming you are not arguing Cano is not likely to age well? Read what you wrote.

                  “His ability to age well really has nothing to do with somehow being labelled as “uncoachable.” However, he won’t age as well because as his bat speed slows down, he won’t be able to catch up to those pitches out of the strike zone or those strikes that just aren’t good pitches to hit.
                  As it stands now, his approach at the plate isn’t going to lead to sustained offensive production when he hits his 30s. (I’m not saying he can’t change though)”

                  I disagree with all of that.

                  “His ability to age well really has nothing to do with somehow being labelled as “uncoachable.””

                  Your argument is that he will not age well because he’s impatient… Kevin Long is trying to coach him to be patient… Therefore, his ability to age according to your theory has everything to do with being uncoachable.
                  However, I disagree that impatient hitters necessarily age any worse. You have given zero examples of an impatient hitter aging poorly. I have given two examples–Vlad and Cabrera–of impatient hitters aging in-line with expectations.

                  “no one is arguing whether Cano HAS to age a particular way or MOST LIKELY will age a particular way, etc.”

                  What? This is exactly what you’re arguing… “he won’t age as well because as his bat speed slows down, he won’t be able to catch up to those pitches out of the strike zone or those strikes that just aren’t good pitches to hit.
                  As it stands now, his approach at the plate isn’t going to lead to sustained offensive production when he hits his 30s.”
                  Do you really deny having typed that?

                  • Mister Delaware says:

                    One is an accident, two is a trend …

                    (Or should I say, “I believe that one is an accident, two is a trend … but I don’t have definitive proof that this is always the case and thus a disclaimer is necessary so as to leave nothing to interpretation.”)

                    • Ted Nelson says:

                      Just like you this commenter said something, then when I pointed out why I disagreed with what they said they told me that they did not in fact say that… that is a trend. Two days in a row I’ve engaged in a discussion with someone totally out of touch with reality.

                      This case was a let more nonsensical, I will admit. The commenter made an entire comment on why Cano would not age well, then said “no one is arguing whether Cano… MOST LIKELY will age a particular way.” If you don’t find that non-sensical I don’t know what to say. Am I supposed to agree with them? When someone literally types something and then denies typing something, should I agree with them?

                      How you don’t see that there’s a huge difference between stating something as a fact and stating it as your opinion… I have no idea.

                    • Ted Nelson says:

                      Seriously, I’m done with this. You said something, it was wrong. Get over yourself.

                    • Mister Delaware says:

                      I promise you you’re taking yourself way too seriously here. Relax a little.

                    • Ted Nelson says:

                      Still having trouble accepting that you were wrong, huh?

        • V says:

          Eventually, he won’t be able to hit those crap pitches, but he’ll keep swinging at them. Robinson Cano with less bat speed = Mark Reynolds.

    • NY_SK says:

      What you really mean is sign cano to be a yankee for the rest of his career, and DO NOT SIGN kevin long for a lifetime contract. I think Cano has earned his yankee pinstripes, and that he has more influence and power than kevin long does

      • V says:

        :snort:

        Because we’re going to just love running a $20M .250/.250/.350 age 36 Robinson Cano out there because he’s ‘earned’ his pinstripes.

        • Mister Delaware says:

          The bright side of the downside is that 2Bs tend to burn out fast. He’d just as likely be injured as he would be in the lineup not producing.

    • OldYanksFan says:

      I agree 100%. Being SMART is a very important hitting skill. Regardless of how much talent you have, adding SMARTS will make you better. Ted Williams was a student of hitting. Being smart was an important part of his game.

      But most importantly, while batspeed and reflexes decline with age, Smarts don’t. So smart hitters have a better chance of aging gracefully then hackers. Does Jeter look smart at the plate this year, or is he hacking more? Are Jeter’s skills at a .620 OPS level, or is his current approach adding to his poor showing?

      Robbie’s skills will decline with age just like everyone else. If he continues to have a poor approach and not take walks, his decline will be a crash.

    • Captain says:

      I disagree…I didn’t listen to K-Long and look how well I am doing this year.

  7. The Guns of the Navarone (a mushroom cloud layn' mothafucka, mothafucka!) says:

    “Since the talk with Long, Cano has seen a total of 35 pitches in 14 plate appearances, or 2.5 per.”

    That information along with the quote at the top of the post is very worrisome. I find it hard to believe that Cano would shake off the advice of his coaches. I’m sure Girardi and Long have the same information we do and have presented that to Robbie. I don’t think it’s a good sign to have a player of his caliber would seemingly ignore advice meant to make him a better hitter…and that has shown to make him a better hitter in the past.

    • spark says:

      If a guy is having success he’s not going to change. Unfortunately, Cano will have to struggle before he makes adjustments. That’s not really a “Cano” thing, that’s a human thing. Like the old saying goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” I think that’s the way Cano is thinking at the moment. We can all disagree, that’s our right. But it’s hard as hell to hit major league pitching. Very few hitters are going to change their approach unless they feel they absolutely have to.

      • The Guns of the Navarone (a mushroom cloud layn' mothafucka, mothafucka!) says:

        Disagree. Cano has already shown that with better plate discipline he can be a better hitter…an elite hitter. To have his regression shown to him and to have him brush it off is not a good sign. Throughout the offseason we all heard about how Cano was hungry to improve on last season. YES had a feature on him working out in the DR. But back in reality it seems like that’s not the case at all.

        Cano had ALREADY changed his approached and improved because of it last season. For him to revert back and to seemingly ignore coaches trying to point him in the right direction is extremely disconcerting.

        • Steve H says:

          Cano had ALREADY changed his approached and improved because of it last season. For him to revert back and to seemingly ignore coaches trying to point him in the right direction is extremely disconcerting.

          I agree. An impatient Robbie is an All-Star. A patient Robbie is an MVP contender.

          • 24fan says:

            I think Cano’s discipline last year has been too quickly identified as a major reason for his success. Robbie swung at the highest percentage of pitches outside the strike zone he ever has last year (although thus far he is swinging at even more this year).

            I’m not saying his patience did or didn’t play a major role in his play, but I’m not sure we can say one way or the other at this point.

            • Mister Delaware says:

              This, 24fan, I think we’re willing to let results overwhelm the issues in the process. In 2010, Cano was still 17th lowest P/PA, still had very high swing %s, both for him and (especially) versus league averages. If you’re just looking at discipline stats in a tunnel, the most telling number there might be that his O-Contact rate dropped. So really, you could suggest his slashes went up last year, in part, because rather than putting bad pitches in play, he just missed them and kept the PA going. It wouldn’t tell the whole story, probably only a tiny bit (because we’re still waiting on hit f/x), but it explains more than a false belief that Cano increased his selectivity.

      • OldYanksFan says:

        Success is a relative thing.
        Cano’s numbers in May are: .233 .303 .333 .636
        How successful is that?

  8. Tipsie says:

    Cano’s lack of selectivity this year has been one of the most disappointing / aggravating things for me to watch this year. Nothing good, long term, will come from this approach. The fact that he has seemingly ignored this conversation with KLong is disturbing. He’s too good to reproduce his awful 2008, but if he keeps this up, 2010 may have been a peak.

    • Ted Nelson says:

      I see what you’re saying, but I wouldn’t jump to so many conclusions either about Robbie’s quote or his career.

      That he’s going to keep swinging doesn’t mean he ignored KLong. He might have heard him out, understood his points, even agreed with him in a general sense for the average hitter, and just disagreed that it was the best approach for him personally. He might have just ignored him… I don’t really feel like I’m in as good a position to evaluate that as the FO that can actually speak to Long and Cano.

      Even if he was the most selective hitter in the league 2010 might have been his peak… he put up a .389 wOBA, good for 12th in all of MLB. So that might not be due to attitude. Everyone seems to love Gardner’s attitude and he’s about as selective as any hitter, and 2010 still might be his career year at the end of the day.

      Vlad seems about as impatient as any hitter, and he had a Silver Slugger season at 32 and got some MVP votes at 33… Cano might easily have 5 more peak seasons after this one if he follows in the Vlad mold… and falling off in your mid-30s in the post-steroid era is now the norm. It’s not like he’s struggling this season: his wOBA of .370 would tie his 3rd best full season. It’s just that maybe he could be even better.

  9. Mister Delaware says:

    I think the grossest part for me was seeing Corey Patterson, Yuniesky Betancourt and Jeff Francoeur among the next 5 guys slightly more selective out of the zone.

  10. Mike c says:

    Cano has been more of a free swinger, I think he would benefit from some better protection behind him. We don’t really have a guy in the 6 hole who pitchers wouldn’t much rather pitch to…. hopefully swish starts heating up or chevrz

    • Mike c says:

      *chavez could be that guy

    • Steve H says:

      Cano doesn’t need protection because he’s not selective though. The pitchers aren’t throwing him garbage because of a lack of protection, they are throwing him garbage because he swings at it.

      • Ted Nelson says:

        Could make a marginal difference in the pitches he sees, which could lead to a relatively big difference in production. Since hitting is all about the margin.

        • Steve H says:

          Protection in general is a concept that may not exist. For a guy like Cano who swings at everything, the pitcher has no incentive to make sure he is throwing strikes. The guy on deck is inconsequential with Cano at the plate because the pitcher knows he can throw pitches off the plate and get swings.

          • Mike c says:

            Not necessarily, if you put a better hitter behind cano, it’s still an incentive to throw more strikes

            • Mister Delaware says:

              What Steve H is saying is that there was a study (or maybe studies) done that showed protection doesn’t really exist. I think it was done a while ago and was outputs based (results of the PAs) rather than inputs based (quality of pitches seen regardless of outcome) so its possible that it may not meaningfully exist on a whole but may exist for certain players (perhaps guys who kill FBs).

            • jetrer says:

              Pitchers won’t choose to throw better pitches unless Cano refuses to swing at the bad pitches. Doesn’t matter if Bautista was behind him right now. Pitchers aren’t going to give Cano much good to hit because they know they don’t have to.

              • Ted Nelson says:

                Because pitchers usually try to give middle-of-the-order bats who finished third in MVP voting last season a lot of good pitches to hit?

                • jetrer says:

                  no, I’m saying the protection won’t matter if Cano doesn’t stop hacking at everything. He hit better last year, but still saw more pitches in the zone. Pitchers are throwing him fewer pitches in the zone this year most likely because he is giving them no reason to have to throw strikes to get him out.

                  • Ted Nelson says:

                    I understand. I was pointing out that pitchers are also not throwing Cano good pitches to hit because they know he will hit them very far. If he was more patient it does not necessarily mean they would throw him better pitches. They might throw him the exact same pitches and just live with the walks that resulted, rather than watching the fall fly out of the park by giving him hittable pitches.

                    • Ted Nelson says:

                      Also, he swung at less pitches outside the zone in 2009 than 2010… and his results were better in 2010. So swinging less at balls doesn’t even mean his results will be better.

          • Ted Nelson says:

            I understand your point and don’t necessarily disagree. I was not disagreeing, just pointing out that a marginal difference in the pitches a hitter sees can make a big difference in production because hitting takes place on the margin.

            “The guy on deck is inconsequential with Cano at the plate because the pitcher knows he can throw pitches off the plate and get swings.”

            This I disagree with. Again, I hate when people make definitive statements about things they are speculating about. It’s your speculation, state it as such.
            I agree with your logic. Again, I’m saying that one different pitch every 10 or 20 or 30 or 50 PAs might make a real difference: hitting happens on the margin. There is a chance that having a hot or better hitter behind him gets Cano one better pitch every X PAs… that’s all I’m saying. Just pointing out that possibility. There’s no way you can prove definitively that it’s not a possibility. I don’t see why you’d try. If he gets one better pitch out of every X pitches, I don’t think that would suddenly turn him into roid-rage Barry Bonds… but it could provide a slight up-tick in his stats. Heck… even this season his hot start and subsequent cool down *might* have *something* to do with the expectation early in the season that the 6 hitter was a good hitter and the subsequent struggles of Swisher and Posada that lost them the respect of pitchers and got Cano crappier pitches. I’m not saying that is what happened, I’m just wondering why you’re so sure that it could not possibly happen.

            • Ted Nelson says:

              To summarize: I don’t disagree with your logic on why protection is less likely to help Cano than a more patient hitter–if it helps at all. I do disagree with your point that you can extend this logic to know as a fact that better protection would not lead to better results (or at least better pitches being seen… which might not actually lead to better results) by Cano. My point is that if he had Pujols hitting behind him and it led to just 10 better pitches all season long… at could lead to several more XBHs and help the Yankees in a meaningful way. Of course, that would be marginal compared to the impact of having a Pujols bat instead of a 2011-to-date Posada/Swisher bat in the line-up…

  11. spark says:

    Plus we have too many other hitters struggling WHILE USING THE RIGHT APPROACH, for me to worry about Cano right now. Even if he was getting on base more right now, he’d just be stranded with the way most of the team is hitting.

  12. Rookie says:

    Great analysis, Mike. Absolute bullseye in every way.

  13. The Guns of the Navarone (a mushroom cloud layn' mothafucka, mothafucka!) says:

    This makes nothing of the fact that Cano has also been very bad in the field this year. There’s no other way to say it. Cano has regressed in every way and it’s unfortunate to see.

  14. Monteroisdinero says:

    Cano hits so well to all fields. This is a tough one. He drives the outside pitch with authority to left and turns so well on the inside pitch. He can be more selective on high fastballs but I wouldn’t tinker too much with him.

    If only Swish and Jeter had such problems…..

  15. jon says:

    at least canos funny

    “I told him in the dugout, I said, ‘This is your first win. So you’ve got to buy me dinner now,’” Cano said. “He said, ‘OK, Saturday.’ I said, ‘You’ve got to take me to one of those special places.’ It’s good. He was here two weeks, didn’t pitch, and came back. It’s good, I like that. Guys, when they don’t pitch, they get their chance.”

  16. Cuso says:

    Personally, I think Robbie just got into a frustrated stretch. He went up there a couple of times trying to be patient and probably took the best pitch he would see in the whole at-bat which just prolonged his frustration.

    He’ll be fine. He just needs to have a 12-pitch AB that results in a long jack to clear his mind.

  17. MikeD says:

    That quote, coupled with his seemingly less-than-focused approach while fielding of late, is a bit concerning. We’ve seen Cano lose focus at the bat and in the field in the past, and it’s never pretty.

    • Mister Delaware says:

      Any coincidence that it came right around the time he got to see his BFF for a series? Like maybe everyone was right about him missing Melky too much to produce, it just took a year and a half to set in?

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