May
11

Soriano day-to-day after MRI shows inflammation

By

Rafael Soriano will be out a least a few more days as the Yankees have said his MRI showed some inflammation in his twice-repaired right elbow. Girardi said the results were “pretty good,” but Soriano will not throw until he has a catch tomorrow. The Yankees expect him to miss a couple of days.

With Soriano out, Joba Chamberlain will inherit the 8th Inning™ while David Robertson will continue to play the role of fireman. For some added bullpen depth, the Yankees activated Luis Ayala from the disabled list today and sent Lance Pendleton back to AAA. Ayala, who has appeared in three games for the Yanks, had been out since early April with a strained oblique.

Categories : Asides, Injuries
  • Fairweather Freddy

    This article has the potential to lead some real nasty comments from the fans

    • http://www.secondavenuesagas.com Benjamin Kabak

      You mean as opposed to the measured looks at Soriano we saw in the thread about his injury last night? It’ll probably be about the same.

  • RL

    It’s all Cahsman’s fault!

    • Fairweather Freddy

      Who is Cahsman?

  • http://twitter.com/AndrewLeighNYC Andrew

    Lance Pendelton, we hardly knew ya. Amazing that he still hasn’t given up a run in his major league career. If he never makes it back to the majors, get his Small Sample Size HOF plaque ready.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      He’s still no Bam Bam Meulens.

  • Gonzo

    Where does Phil Hughes and ManBan fit into the bullpen?

    Too soon?

    • Tom Zig

      Phil Hughes: ROOGY
      ManBan: LOOGY

      The Yankees are in the business of marginalizing current and former starting pitching prospects.

  • Billy Mumphrey

    He’s a complete waste of money and roster space. We are better served to have D-Rob get higher leverage innings. Soriano losing his job to D-Rob would be the best thing ever to happen to us.

    • Ted Nelson

      Yeah, because Soriano is obviously the 5.79 ERA guy he’s been this season and not the 2.84 ERA guys he’s been on his career… makes sense.

      • JobaWockeeZ

        As if he was guaranteed to pitch to that 2.84 ERA since relief pitchers change drastically from season to season.

        Meanwhile the Rays sport one of the best bullpens in the game and combined are probably cheaper than one year of Soriano.

        Our only hope is getting an idiot to take on Soriano. Angels need relief help, I’ll gladly take anyone form Trout to a peanut from their concession stands.

        • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

          As if he was guaranteed to pitch to that 2.84 ERA since relief pitchers change drastically from season to season.

          I didn’t like the contract or anything either but that’s a bit unfair. Soriano has a career marred by some pretty ugly injury history, but he’s been pretty darn good in terms of results from year to year. He has not been radically up and down. No, he wasn’t guaranteed to pitch to a 2.84 ERA or anything like that, but if you expected the issue this year to be a really really bad performance you’re just lying.

        • Ted Nelson

          As bex says… you’re out of touch with reality suggesting that Soriano’s performance has varied wildly. He’s never had a healthy relief season with an ERA over 3.

          The Rays bullpen has a .236 BABIP… their FIP is actually 3.75 while the Yankees’ is 3.06. We’re 1/5 of the way through the season… let’s not count our eggs before they hatch.

          Did you really suggest that the Angels trade Trout… a top 3 prospect by most accounts… for Soriano? We could also hope that Soriano pitches well and not whine about the money since it’s not stopping the Yankees from making other moves.

          • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

            I think the Trout thing was exaggeration for effect.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            The Rays bullpen has a .236 BABIP… their FIP is actually 3.75 while the Yankees’ is 3.06. We’re 1/5 of the way through the season… let’s not count our eggs before they hatch.

            That. The Rays collection of castoffs is pitching way over their head; I doubt they keep it up much longer.

            I mean, Kyle Farnsworth hasn’t allowed a walk all year. Do you really think he’s going to make it through an entire season without giving up a horrible walk at the least opportune time, like, say, with the bases loaded in a tie game on the road in the bottom of the 9th? Me neither. Krazy Kyle is bound to give up a walk-off-walk sometime soon. Book it. I can feel it in my bones.

  • JobaWockeeZ

    Bravo Randy Levine. Brian Cashman was approved for a reason you know. Dick.

  • JobaWockeeZ

    Please opt the fuck out after this year.

    • FIPster Doofus

      That seemed like a certainty when Soriano signed. Now it seems more and more like an impossibility.

    • Ted Nelson

      You really think he’s likely to opt out at this point with this start and all the closers hitting free agency this off-season? And do you really even want him to opt out for any rational reason? He’s never had a full healthy season in his career go poorly… what are the odds he’s bad again in 2012 if he’s bad/injured in 2011?

      • JobaWockeeZ

        Your first question is a damn myth and you know it. There’s no supply and demand in baseball when there’s always the same teams year in and year out.

        If 5 closers go on the market then guess what? 5 teams are going to need a closer. If you’re going to argue that Soriano is a top tiered reliever then he should EASILY get money.

        And you’re kidding on the second question right? You don’t think there’s a rational reason why Soriano should opt out? 10 million dollars for every relief pitcher is a stupid contract./ Unless you can find me a reliever that’s been worth 10 million over a 3 or 4 year stretch. No Mariano doesn’t make your point valid. And I’m sure the two (or at this rate one) picks would be a rational point.

        • http://www.twitter.com/deanezag Zack

          Just because 5 closers become available doesn’t mean their former teams are going to invest 10m in a closer.
          Heath Bell is a FA is SD paying a FA to replace him? Think Mets are spending 10m to replace Krod?

          • JobaWockeeZ

            So? Since Soriano is being argued as a 2.84 ERA guy you don’t think one team in a year where multiple teams need closers will let him go?

            Unless the argument changed that Soriano is t3h sux0r.

            • Ted Nelson

              Real rational… bravo. No. If Soriano is a 2.84 ERA guy coming off a poor-ish season (hopefully it’s a solid season… but an ERA of almost 6 almost a quarter of the way through the season makes a good overall season unlikely), but Papelbon is a 2.23 ERA guy and K-Rod is a 2.46 ERA guy… Heath Bell’s ERA has been under 2 for 2 seasons in a row… Joel Zumaya is coming off his 25 year old season with a sub-3 ERA… and if Nathan, Broxton, Lidge, Madson, etc. are willing to take less money… See how the supply side of supply and demand works?

        • Ted Nelson

          “Your first question is a damn myth and you know it. There’s no supply and demand in baseball when there’s always the same teams year in and year out.”

          I have no idea what you’re talking about… there is supply and demand in any market. It’s not even just about supple and demand anyway. Soriano has over $10 mill coming to him guaranteed next season if he wants it… he has to consider whether to take the risk of opting out. I will guarantee Boras looks at the teams who may be looking to spend big on a reliever and the better relievers than Soriano available before making that decision.

          “If 5 closers go on the market then guess what? 5 teams are going to need a closer.”

          Not necessarily… If a small market team loses their closer they don’t necessarily spend big to replace him. Even a big market team may have the internal options not to spend big. Closer is not a real thing… just a word. If there are 5 guys looking for “closer” money and 4 teams willing to pay it… one guy is left without a seat.

          “You don’t think there’s a rational reason why Soriano should opt out?”

          I don’t think your reason is rational, but emotionally driven. If Soriano stinks it up this season and/or is injured, there’s a very good chance he comes back in a big way in 2012. If you can pay $10 mill for a bad season or $20 mill for a bad season and a good season… which do you choose? Say $10 mill for 1 WAR from a reliever or $20 mill for 2.7 WAR. (WAR not being the proper way to value relievers, but a convenient tool.)

          “Unless you can find me a reliever that’s been worth 10 million over a 3 or 4 year stretch. No Mariano doesn’t make your point valid.”

          I can name a bunch of guys who have had more than 3+ good seasons in relief… Trevor Hoffman, John Wettland, Joakim Soria, Rafael Soriano, Papelbon, K-Rod, Broxton, Joe Nathan, Billy Wagner, Tom Gordon, Marmol will, Lee Smith, Doug Jones, Tom Henke, Dennis Eckersley, Robb Nen, John Franco, Duane Ward… you have to define what you think is worth $10 mill per season. There are tons of relievers with extended success.

          • Gonzo

            Tom Henke! I loved Tom Henke back in the day. I was never a Jays fan, but Stieb and Henke on the same team was nice.

    • Not Tank the Frank

      It’s all about the dollars. The question you need to ask is, can he get more than $11 million whether he closes or not? Or the potential for $14 million after next season? I would think the answer is no…even if he turns it around and completely dominates. That’s huge money. Fourteen million is approaching Mariano money, the kind that’s never been seen for a reliever. He’s guaranteed that much in 2013. He’d be stupid to walk away from it.

      The Yankees are stuck with Soriano.

      • JobaWockeeZ

        Did his side push for the opt out clause? Because I don’t think anyone really has not used their opt out clause yet in MLB history…

        There’s always a dumbass running the dollars. It’s possible he can get more. Don’t doubt MLB officials.

        Then again the Yankees did offer him too much yet again.

        • Not Tank the Frank

          No, from what I understand it was all Levine telling him, “Here’s a huge contract, but you’re not going to close. If you want to look for better deal where you can close, you can opt out after each year. I’m giving you the most player-friendly deal in history. Please sign with us.”

        • Ted Nelson

          “Because I don’t think anyone really has not used their opt out clause yet in MLB history…”

          If a guy stinks it up, you don’t hear about the opt out because he doesn’t use it.

          • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com bexarama

            Posada didn’t after 2004, coming off a .272/.400/.481 season as catcher. Though I agree it is not that likely, I’m sure there are other examples.

  • http://facebook.com/andrewjcalagna Drew

    Soriano is becoming the most hated Yankee since Jeff Weaver. Just an FYI I was a huge Weaver fan.

    • JobaWockeeZ

      Carl Pavano?

      • Not Tank the Frank

        A-Rod?

        /2006’d

        • Kyle

          IMO no one tops Hideki I-rob-u

        • Zooboy

          Ed Whitson says “hi.”

  • Yank the Frank

    Goose Gossage started out poorly for the Yanks too, but he turned out ok. Same thing can happen to Soriano.

  • Rookie

    If the Yankees are going to abuse their relief pitchers by putting them out there to pitch four days out of five or warm them up every game or pitch them too many pitches or too many days in a short period, then they’re going to destroy them whether they’re free agents or their own prospects.

    In that case, it seems to me that they have three choices (or a combination thereof):
    (1) Pay up for past success with guys like Soriano.
    (2) Use talented, young prospects like Hughes and Joba.
    (3) Put a patchwork together of disposable players a la Ayala.

    I propose a very radical fourth choice. TO AVOID ABUSING THEIR RELIEF PITCHERS — EVEN IF IT MEANS LOSING SOME GAMES TO PROTECT THEIR BULLPEN ARMS!

    With Torre, the Yankees could have assembled the seven or eight best relief pitchers in the game at the beginning of every year; and by the end of the year, Torre would have destroyed half of them and let the other half deteriorate from being rusty from not pitching. Prior to this year, it seemed like Girardi babied his bullpen. I give him credit for that. I think it’s smart. This year, based on his bullpen management (among other things) he seems to have been possessed by the ghost of Joe Torre. This is not a prescription for success — especially by the time the postseason rolls around.

    Joe Torre, in his bullpen management, was like someone who kills their parents and then asks for mercy because he’s an orphan. Girardi damaged an elite closer level weapon in his bullpen with overuse. The only question in my mind is whether or not he’ll learn from his mistake or blame it on someone or something else.