Jun
22

The obvious and non-obvious problems running the bases

By

This was supposed to be a full article about the Yankees’ base running woes this season. We see them all the time: the pickoffs, the slow jumps, the horrible decisions to attempt the extra base, the rundowns, etc. But there are other aspects that aren’t as easy to see. For example, did you know that the Yankees rank among the worst for their base runners taking two bases on a single and three on a double? It’s not as easy to see, because it’s something that doesn’t happen, rather than something that does. In any case, as I was writing this I was reading through my favorite Yankees blogs, and I found that Moshe at The Yankee Analysts had already covered the topic. It’s a fantastically comprehensive view of the Yankees base running troubles, and it gets RAB’s highest recommendation.

Categories : Asides

14 Comments»

  1. Oh, Moshe already wrote the article, and it’s excellent? Then just copy and paste a paragraph or two, source the rest, and rip off his pageviews.

    Works like a charm.

    Sincerely,
    HuffPo

  2. T-Dubs says:

    I enjoyed this piece. I was curious whether the baserunning was actually worse or if it was a perception thing. Glad to know it’s not just me.

  3. CMP says:

    Maybe they can hire Bobby Valentine to be the baserunning coach.

    • haha, was just about to mention him…Jesus, he went on for 3 innings about ARod’s base running.

      • I don’t think we have enough room in the payroll to hire Bobby Valentine, Baserunning Coach. I’m sure insight like that costs a few million dollars per hour.

      • CP says:

        The thing is, it was an interesting point at first.

        And then it got old and boring.

        And then he kept talking about it for another full inning or two.

        • Sayid J says:

          Yea exactly. That’s the thing. He was actually right. A-Rod should’ve been leading further back to get a better angle rounding third. And even mentioning how good Gardner was at hitting his strides was interesting because you often see guys take short steps to hit the base right but Gardner had it down perfectly. But then he didn’t stop talking about it for the rest of the game.

  4. nathan says:

    Slacker !!

  5. mikef says:

    If George were alive and in his prime, he would have already fired the first base coach.

    • And nothing would have changed, and he would have then fired another first base coach, and still nothing would have changed, indicating that George’s constant emotional ravings and firings were pretty worthless and counterproductive.

      I love George Steinbrenner for a great many things. Haphazardly and irrationally firing people was not one of those things.

      • Cris Pengiuci says:

        And at some point, someone might have informed George that the 3rd base coach actually had more influence on taking the extra bases and George would have fired the person that finally gave him that information.

  6. teix marks the spot says:

    Here’s another way to look at the Yanks failure to take a second base on a single or a third base on a double…

    Isn’t it possible that they are cognizant of the power and general baseball hitting talent up and down this line-up and don’t want to risk extra outs taking a base that may not matter? Honestly, unless there are already two outs and either Jeter, Jorge, or Cervelli is coming up, wouldn’t you prefer the extra men sitting on base for pretty much everyone else (I’m talking about the regulars) in the lineup? There’s nothing worse than watching A-Rod or Jorge get thrown out trying to take an extra base only to watch the next guy up club a homer.

    I understand the WPA concept of an extra base here and there, but on this team you’re almost always in scoring position just by being on base so (late and close circumstances excluded) the extra base doesn’t mean much in the first six or seven innings of most normal regular season Yankees games.

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