Jan
23

Fan Confidence Poll: January 23rd, 2012

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2011 Record: 97-65 (855 RS, 657 RA, 102-60 pythag. record), won AL East, lost to Tigers in ALDS

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Please take a second to answer the poll below and give us an idea of how confident you are in the team. You can view the interactive Fan Confidence Graph anytime via the nav bar above, or by clicking here. Thanks in advance for voting.

Given the team's current roster construction, farm system, management, etc., how confident are you in the Yankees' overall future?
View Results
Categories : Polls
  • Hardy

    I’m back up to 8, because I am more confident that the report about 189 in 14 is wrong.

    • RetroRob

      I believe the Yankees will try to reach 189 in 14. I says it’s 50-50 if they achieve it, but the attempt to get their will impact decisions.

      • YanksFan

        Agreed. They will only break out for the right people. CC’s and Lee’s. Maybel Hamels but if Pineda improves, Nova shows up as the 2nd half Nova, Hughes rebounds, the B’s develop I can see not going after him.

  • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

    All worries regarding the pitching staff have now shifted to the offense. The Yankees need a good 3B so that they can move A-Rod to DH full-time and get the most out of whatever production remains in that body. I’m also interested to see what they do with RF after Swisher.

    I know this is looking ahead a little bit, but I think that the signs of an offensive breakdown are real and the Yankees need to start addressing them now.

    • TomH

      Agree. The age issues are very real, and primarily, now, most likely to affect the offense, with Jeter and ARod. These have been key producers for a long time, hall-of-fame guys, and not easy to replace. There is also the matter of Rivera, but for the time, I’m less concerned about that. Of course, he is, in important ways, irreplaceable, but Robertson may well be effective in that role some day. And, who knows, perhaps even Joba.

      But for the immediate future it’s the offense that needs reloading.

      • thenamestsam

        I think immediate future may be overstating it if immediate future is intended to mean this year. They return all of the important contributors from the team that finished 2nd in offense this year. They scored about 145 runs more than the league average, so even in an absolute worst case scenario I think the offense will still be well above league average and a relative strength.

        On the other hand I agree with concerns about the offense over a longer horizon. When I think about the 2014 austerity budget (if it’s real), my major concern is how the inability to add a big free agent bat before then impacts the offense. At that point Jeter, ARod and Tex will all be somewhere between mediocrity and sub-replacement level, Granderson (if still around) and Cano will be exiting their primes and likely not posting .380 wOBA years any more. The catcher spot is unlikely to be a significant source of offense.

        Unless they can get creative and figure out a way to add a big bat (most likely a corner outfielder or a 3rd baseman) I think the offense may start to be a significant weakness.

        • Robinson Tilapia

          Star players get old. It happens. It won’t be the first time a team needs to reinvent itself over time.

          We’ve seen the team make a stronger commitment towards a younger, cost-controlled solid pitching staff. Over time, we will see how the team addresses the issue of replacing its core from the past ten years plus. Your Yankees of 2018 may look and play a different brand of baseball than your 2009 Yankees. I am confident, though, that whether it is through developing their own players, trades, FA signings, or sheer luck, that they will do so. The past 15 years have shown that, whether successful or not in the end, they will put the best team out there they can, even if they have a paltry $189 million to spend.

          • thenamestsam

            I’m not especially worried either. I voted an 8, and I’m closer to a 9 than a 7. All worries are relative though, and this is my largest area of concern. We have to talk about something, and saying “This is a fantastic organization with unparalleled resources, a combination that has allowed them to be one of the best teams in baseball nearly every year for the last 15 years and seems primed to do so for the forseeable future”, gets boring, so instead we nitpick.

            Not to lose perspective here: If the biggest concern for your team is the 2014 offense, that’s a damn good spot to be in.

      • Sweet Dick Willie

        If by immediate future you mean 2012, I disagree. I believe the offense will be fine this year.

        A couple of years out, I agree; something will have to be done.

        But the young pitching picture should become clearer after this year, so perhaps some of that will have to be dealt to bolster the offense down the road.

        • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

          A couple of years out, I agree; something will have to be done.

          That’s true for every single team.

          • thenamestsam

            True, but the Yankees do have less flexibility than many teams. They’re locked in at all 4 infield positions through at least 2014 (I don’t think they would ever allow Cano to leave).

            Also the thing that most competitive teams do in that situation is just go through a period of diminished competitiveness. For the Yankees, that wouldn’t seem to be an option. They will expect to remain a top-5 offense every year. That makes them pretty different than most teams, and makes the need to do something slightly more urgent.

          • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

            True, but you could try to dismiss a lot of statements by simply applying them to the general population.

            We’re talking specifically about this Yankees team during this particular point in time. That the statement may be true for every other team doesn’t diminish the concern regarding the Yankees offense.

            • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

              The point is that that concern is valid at all times. It is right now, and will be three years, five years, and ten years from now regardless of what they Yankees do. The fear of aging players falling off a cliff never goes away, it’s just something to worry about at this point in time because there are very, very few other reasons to worry about this team.

              • Plank

                The Yankees have a 38 year old SS and a 36 year old 3B locked up for a combined 9 seasons. That’s a lot of dead weight as soon as this season. Saying every team has to worry about players aging is true. The Yankees of 2012 have a bigger concern than most other teams in that department, though.

        • Robinson Tilapia

          We also knew the middle part of this decade would be an issue several years ago. If we, as commenters on a blog, knew that, I’d wager the front office noticed as well.

          • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

            You’re probably right. Just because they/we recognized it doesn’t mean that something will necessarily be done about it though. The Yanks have gone long stretches (relatively speaking) with sub-par pitching staffs despite the obvious need for upgrades.

            • Robinson Tilapia

              They went through the majority of the 1980’s with crap, mainly because Steinbrenner thought .500 pitchers would morph into Cy Young winners the moment they put on a Yankee uniform.

              Since, though, the results may not have been what everyone wanted, but I don’t see where the team did not try to put five solid pitchers out there every year. Even when it was a misguided attempt (Hello, Carl and Jaret), there was an attempt at something.

              They can do their best. They can’t guarantee it’s all going to work out.

              The Yankees tried to solve their third base issue once with Aaron Boone. What wound up happening? Could we, or they, have predicted that? Maybe they could have known more about how life with Jason Giambi at first would turn out. Maybe they couldn’t. You don’t know how it’s going to turn out, but you can rest assured they will have plans.

    • CP

      What signs of an offensive breakdown?

      • http://www.riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

        Probably the ALDS.

        • nsalem

          If you want to cite the ALDS A-Rod’ poor performance was probably due to injury. The other 3 “culprits” Martin Tex and Swisher do not have age issues. I think any chance of Swisher remaining on the Yankee’s after 2012 will depend on his playoff performance this year if the Yankee’s get that far.

          • Robinson Tilapia

            Whether Swisher remains on the Yankees will depend on his OVERALL performance, the type of contract he seeks, and what the alternatives turn out to be after the season.

            • nsalem

              Disagree. I think another poor playoff performance and a quick exit for thew Yankees from the post season would spell an end to his Yankee career. I hope it’s something we never find out and I agree with you that your thoughts is more of a common sense approach. However common sense sometimes is not always an ingredient in the world of decision making.

              • Mike HC

                By the same token, he can rip up the post season Hideki Matsui 2009 style, and still not be back.

      • Robinson Tilapia

        They were no-hit, um, yesterday.

        • RetroRob

          I’m tired of fans sugar-coating the situation. No-hit yesterday, I can’t remember this team getting a single hit, since I don’t know, maybe October!

      • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

        thenamestsam pretty much sums up the signs I’m referring to. It could be as soon as 2013 when you look at the Yankees offense and only see three big bats – and depending on how you feel about Teixeira, that list could shrink to two.

        As stated above, Cano and Granderson aren’t getting better at this point and it won’t be THAT long before they are exiting their prime years. I don’t think that means they’re going to fall off of a cliff anytime soon, but I think it means they’ll need some help in the lineup. You can also add in the fact that the Yankees have no reinforcements close to graduating from the pipeline.

        So no, the signs have nothing to do with the ALDS.

    • steve s

      I agree Craig. Compared to the mid 2000 teams the Yanks need to replace prime production years that use to be provided at 3rd, SS and catcher as well as deal with first base production that’s been trending south and production from Granderson last year that chances are will never come close to being duplicated by him. Maybe we haven’t seen Cano’s ceiling yet but that’s to be determined. Gardner is a nice piece but what he brings to the table doesn’t over-compensate for the reduction in production from the other positions mentioned. Even assuming Swisher gives you comparable production the current roster, with a revolving DH, is going to be the big issue going forward for the forseeable future.

      • YanksFan

        Don’t agree. I agree that the production will slip from what it is today. I do not agree that it’s as big of a problem as some people are saying. The #3 offense in MLB was 70 runs higher than the #4 offense. Not many fans understand how much offense the rest of MLB does NOT have. The NYY can score 140 runs less and still be 10th in MLB, which would be 5 in the AL. How bad is that?

  • Paul VuvuZuvella

    I’m at a 9. Went there last poll. Had never been higher than 8 previously and even dropped to 7 after missing Yu. The things the Yanks need to do now to get to a “perfect” on-paper team are so small compared to their rivals. I’m extremely confident about 2012. I’m also very confident beyond and not as worried about the reduction to $189 million payroll in 2014 now that Pineda is on-board. If all goes according to plan (Pineda proves rookie year was no fluke and pitches like a 2 in NY, Nova develops/improves in year 2 as middle of rotation pitcher, Hughes becomes a solid middle of rotation starter and just 1 Killer B develops enough to instill faith about a successful 2013 rookie campaign), they won’t need to overspend for Hamels and can stay on top. They’ll fill the offensive needs as they arise.

  • Robinson Tilapia

    8. Just get out there and play already.

    • jsbrendog

      it’s amazing how things can change so drastically form year to year. last year in spring training i was excited to see bartolo colon pitch and this year it’s pineda. just a bit of a difference there eh?

      • Robinson Tilapia

        …..and we could have never predicted either. This is why I think some of the above comments are due to people looking for something to worry about. Enjoy the ride, wherever it may lead you.

        More stoked as to seeing what the rotation offers every minute, no matter where it takes us all.

        • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

          Just because some moves and/or performances were unforeseen, doesn’t mean that fans shouldn’t have concerns and express them. I’d say the unpredictable nature of some of Cashman’s moves is more of a reason not to get too worked up over stale rumors.

  • MelHallsBattingGlove

    the possibility of having 4 arms in the rotation by 2013 that are young, cost controlled and good is very exciting and for me makes me worry alot less about the offense going forward>>>i dont see them going after hamels next offseason if all goes according to plan with the young pitchers and instead using money normally allocated for the rotation to bolster the offense as it age…my only real concern is if tex doesnt rebound to the player he was is the lack of roster manuerverability that they may face…gave them a 9…most confidence i have had in this team in an offseason since they signed CC (the first time)

    • Tim

      I don’t see them going after Hamels next year even if Pineda struggles in 2012. I think it is pretty clear now more than ever that this team is not interested in tacking on another long-term $20+ million dollar contract onto their already bloated payroll. You’d be paying for what Hamels has already done, not what he is going to give you in the future. And that is the great flaw with free agency, and why baseball, without a salary cap, remains competitively balanced. Teams with the money can’t sign guys to free agent contracts until they are approaching the wrong side of their careers, leaving said teams hamstrung with bad, immovable contracts that hamper a team’s ability to shore up other areas of their rosters. Cases in point – both Chicago teams, the Mets, Dodgers, and even the Red Sox last year. The only reason the Yankees are not in this group is because they have so much money that they can outspend everyone and shore up wholes regardless of how many holes the free agent signings create. Well, up to a point, which it appears they are nearing as we speak.

      By the way, I have them at either an 8 or a 9. Can’t decide which.

    • Tim

      I don’t see them going after Hamels next year even if Pineda struggles in 2012. I think it is pretty clear now more than ever that this team is not interested in tacking on another long-term $20+ million dollar contract onto their already bloated payroll. You’d be paying for what Hamels has already done, not what he is going to give you in the future. And that is the great flaw with free agency, and why baseball, without a salary cap, remains competitively balanced. Teams with the money can’t sign guys to free agent contracts until they are approaching the wrong side of their careers, leaving said teams hamstrung with bad, immovable contracts that hamper a team’s ability to shore up other areas of their rosters. Cases in point – both Chicago teams, the Mets, Dodgers, and even the Red Sox last year. The only reason the Yankees are not in this group is because they have so much money that they can outspend everyone and shore up holes regardless of how many holes the free agent signings create. Well, up to a point, which it appears they are nearing as we speak.

      By the way, I have them at either an 8 or a 9. Can’t decide which.

      • Tim

        Didn’t mean to double post, saw that I misspelled “holes” once. Sorry for the egregious violation of message board etiquette.

  • vin

    Another week, another 8.

  • Rich in NJ

    They are relying a lot on aging veterans to have a resurgence so that they are better v. RHP (.255/.336/.435/.771). I hope it works out for at least another year. I’m skeptical.

    • Sweet Dick Willie

      There are only 2 starters who fit the description of “aging veterans”.

      You’re entitled to be skeptical, but that skepticism should be based on reality, not some figment of your imagination.

      • Tim

        Someone on ESPN or MLB network told me to be skeptical. So I am gonna be skeptical.

      • gc

        Technically, ALL players on the team are aging. :)

        But you’re right, the two players on the left side of the infield are old. Everyone else in the every day starting line-up is pretty much in the prime production years of their careers.

      • Rich in NJ

        Both have been critical to this team’s success for years and both play positions that are very hard to replace with comparable offense, so does it matter if only it’s only two?

        Also, Tex v. RHP has looked like an aging veteran.

        Either way, how does your point address their offensive deficit v. RHP>?

    • TomH

      You make the key–and really disarmingly simple and obvious point: “They are relying a lot on aging veterans to have a resurgence so that they are better v. RHP…“.

      Someone said earlier that stars, after all, age and teams must replace them. An empty truism. Of course they do, and often teams don’t replace them, as the Yankees did not in the years 1965-70. It’s one of the highest–perhaps THE highest–hurdles in the business of baseball, replacing multiple stars.

      And it is possible–possibly even probably–that the Yankees of the future may play a different kind of baseball from the brand we’ve been used to the past 10-15 years. That too happens in the business of baseball and is not a matter, in itself, for alarm.

      The question is whether that different brand of baseball they play will be played at a level comparable to what we’ve know in those 10-15 years now entering the rear-view mirror.

      One hopes they will, and the team has certainly been run well enough to be amazingly competitive all those years. But the business of the game is changing (189 and all that), and we don’t know how that will effect reloading (will the reload be at the same calibre?). The team was able to make amazingly effective use of the business of baseball when free agency entered the picture (with some memorable bungles, too). This new wrinkle, though–intended as it is to keep New York and Boston on a tighter leash?–is going to test them because this ownership (i.e., the family, if not the persons) and this GM have honed themselves on the old way of free agency, not this new way.

  • RetroRob

    Yankees fans have been worrying about the Yankees’ offense as long as I’ve been watching Yankees games, oh some 30 years.

    • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

      Certainly since 2002 there hasn’t much reason to be worried about the Yankees’ offense.

  • TheOneWhoKnocks

    My confidence is a 7 with Pineda + Campos
    It was a 9 with Montero and Noesi

  • LarryM.,Fl.

    9 is my highest score of confidence unless the team wins the WS. The Yankees don’t believe DH is a priority. I agree. Giving a player such as Dickerson, lefty AB’s, is a good thing. Allowing Jones the AB’s from the right side is a good thing. We have enough guys who need a day off from the porch side who can fill the spot when 1/2 days are needed. Cano, Teix., Swish, Gardner and Granderson. We have the bats. I would like to see Laird given the spot to play for Arod and Teix. on occassion. He has value on the 25 man roster non at AAA. Its time for him to show his stuff on a more regular basis as opposed to up and down the Scranton plane. Filling in at the end of a game assist Arod to stay fresher throughout the year and avoid injuries when his presence in a game is not necessary.

    • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

      The improved pitching staff puts the team in a good spot going forward but let’s not get complacent. While the Yanks definitely remain a contender on paper, they are not far enough ahead of the pack to just throw any ol’ slop into a DH platoon.

      • LarryM.,Fl.

        Craig: “any ol’ slop into a DH platoon.” Yeah I indicated Jones and Dickerson but Teix. and Cano plus Arod and Jeter etc. are not any old slop. The team can play well if Girardi gives the older guys some rest every weak which means playing guys off the bench.

        • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

          I like the idea of resting the older guys. Perhaps I let some of my general dislike of DH suggestions over the past week or so seep into my response to you.

          At the same time, I’m just not excited about a DH situation with Dickerson and Laird getting a lot of at-bats. That would get old after about two weeks.

          • YanksFan

            I’m fine with giving them a shot. Outside of Big Druggie & Montero what team has a DH that you would die to have? There is more slop out there today than 5 years ago at that position, Hell, all positions.

            Have a revolving door of all the youngsters and the team will still be Top 3 in MLB.

            • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

              Rays, Rangers, Royals, Indians

              Possibly the Twins (Morneau) and Angels as well.

              Turns out I misread the question. I wouldn’t “die” to have those teams’ DHs, but I’d prefer them over some of the stuff that fans have been throwing out as ideas.

      • http://riveraveblues.com Rich

        The problem is that all the DH’s that are left are aging slop. I agree with Larry. Use dickerson and Laird an we’ll be just fine. Plus we need another infielder on the bench and Dickerson gives us some outfield options as well. Most of the available DH’s have no defensive ability.

        • http://www.bronxbombersreport.com Craig Maduro

          You’re right. There is not a lot for the Yankees to choose from at this point. They pussyfooted around Pena and he signed with the Rays (I took that statement a bit far since I don’t even know what Pena’s side of the story was). They could still go after Prince Fielder and as unlikely as that is, I would much rather them do that than trot out some busted DH tandem.

          I’m on board with Andruw Jones handling LHP as one half of a platoon, but I don’t see Laird and Dickerson being anywhere close to a solution. What have they done to warrant significant AB’s on a team that hopes/expects to contend for the World Series?

          I’m keeping my fingers crossed that there is another trade on deck once the Montero trade is made official.

  • Gregg

    Probably a 7 or 8. I’m a littled concerned about Roger Waters still being at odds with the rest of Pink Floyd.

    • Robinson Tilapia

      Waters doesn’t surround himself with a bad crew, though. As long as the solo material’s kept to a minimum (sorry, solo Waters fans. I’d ask that the Gilmour solo material be kept to a minimum as well, lest I fall asleep at the wheel.)

  • YanksFan

    Still a 9. Like the trade for Pineda. Still feel like another trade will occur. Can’t have too much pitching. Romine may be ready this year. Hopefully the B’s progress.

    As I’ve said in other posts up top, not as concerned about the offense as others. Not too many teams have an offense and believe there are better hitters who hit FA than P’s. Since 2009 you’ve had CC & Lee who are clearly elite. Everyone else 2nd tier and worse. Hitters had Pujols, Fielder, Reyes just this year. Better chance of getting a decent bat at a decent price than the P’s.