Aug
19

Williams and Sanchez double in Trenton’s blowout win

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The Yankees have signed RHP Edwin Fierro out of the Mexican League, reports Matt Eddy. The 19-year-old had a 3.03 ERA and 3.87 FIP in 38.2 innings for Campeche, which is pretty impressive considering the Mexican League is usually somewhere between Double-A and Triple-A. The Yankees have a knack for digging up prospects in Mexico — RHP Al Aceves, LHP Manny Banuelos, RHP Gio Gallegos, for example — so Fierro might be someone worth keeping an eye on.

In other news, both RHP Bryan Mitchell and RHP Manny Barreda have been bumped up to Double-A Trenton, reports Mike Ashmore. To clear room on the roster, 1B Saxon Butler was sent to High-A Tampa and LHP Aaron Dott was placed on the DL. The Thunder are likely going to postseason, so expect them to get some reinforcements in the coming weeks. With that in mind, let’s update the standings. It’s been a while.

Triple-A Scranton (8-2 loss to Lehigh Valley) 62-68, 9.5 games back in International League North Division

  • C J.R. Murphy: 0-4, 2 K — feels like he catches everyday, but he does indeed get days off once in a while
  • CF Melky Mesa: 1-4, 1 R, 1 K — threw a runner out at third
  • RF Ronnie Mustelier: 2-4, 1 RBI
  • RHP Chris Bootcheck: 6.2 IP, 9 H, 5 R, 5 ER, 2 BB, 4 K, 9/5 GB/FB — 65 of 108 pitches were strikes (60%)

Double-A Trenton (10-3 win over New Britain) 66-61, 13.5 games back in Eastern League East Division … they have a 3.5-game lead on the wildcard spot

  • CF Mason Williams: 1-5, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 RBI, 1 K
  • LF Ramon Flores: 0-6, 1 K — threw a runner out at the plate
  • C Gary Sanchez: 2-4, 2 R, 1 2B, 2 BB — 14-for-45 (.311) with five doubles, seven walks, and seven strikeouts in ten games at this level
  • DH Ben Gamel: 0-4, 2 BB, 2 K
  • RHP Bryan Mitchell: 5 IP, 4 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 3 BB, 3 K, 1 WP, 1 HB, 3/6 GB/FB — 53 of 90 pitches were strikes (59%)
  • RHP Diego Moreno: 2 IP, zeroes, 2 K, 1/2 GB/FB — 16 of 22 pitches were strikes (73%) … 36/11 K/BB in 36.1 innings following Tommy John surgery

High-A Tampa had a scheduled off day. They’re 52-69 and 16.0 games back in Florida State League North Division.

Low-A Charleston (5-3 loss to Rome) 67-58, 5.0 games back in South Atlanta League Southern Division

  • CF Jake Cave: 1-4, 1 R, 1 BB, 1 K
  • 1B Greg Bird: 0-1, 4 BB, 1 K — up to 95 walks with 13 games to go
  • 3B Dante Bichette Jr.: 2-4, 1 RBI — 6-for-23 (.261) since coming off the DL
  • 2B Angelo Gumbs: 1-4, 1 RBI

Short Season Staten Island Game One (3-2 loss to Brooklyn in seven innings) makeup of the June 18th rainout

  • SS Abi Avelino: 2-4, 1 RBI — 8-for-23 (.348) after taking an 0-fer in his first game at this level
  • CF Michael O’Neill: 1-4, 1 2B, 1 K — five hits in his last 23 (.217), but four doubles
  • 3B Eric Jagielo: 1-3, 1 BB, 2 K
  • LF Brandon Thomas: 1-4, 1 K
  • RHP Gio Gallegos: 4 IP, 5 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 3 BB, 2 K, 1 HB, 1 Balk, 4/3 GB/FB

Short Season Staten Island Game One (5-2 win over Brooklyn) 23-35, 7.5 games back in NY-Penn League McNamara Division

  • SS Abi Avelino: 0-3, 2 R, 1 BB
  • CF Michael O’Neill: 0-3, 1 BB, 2 K
  • 3B Yeicok Calderon: 2-3, 1 R, 1 2B, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 1 K — the box score says Calderon at third, but that’s definitely wrong, he’s a lefty thrower … guessing this was Jagielo and the box is messed up
  • LF Brandon Thomas: 1-3, 1 BB, 1 K, 1 SB
  • RHP Cale Coshow: 3 IP, 3 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 1 BB, 2 K, 6/1 GB/FB
  • RHP Stefan Lopez: 1 IP, zeroes, 2 K, 1/0 GB/FB — 36/7 K/BB in 29.2 innings

Rookie GCL Yanks1 (1-0 win over GCL Braves in seven innings) completed early due to rain … 24-27, 2.0 games back in GCL Northwest Division

  • SS Tyler Wade: 0-2, 1 K, 1 SB, 1 HBP
  • 2B Gosuke Katoh: 1-3, 1 R
  • RF Austin Aune: 0-3, 3 K — this is getting silly
  • RHP Brady Lail: 6 IP, 3 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 6 K, 8/4 GB/FB — 48/5 K/BB in 52.1 innings

Rookie GCL Yanks2 (3-2 loss to GCL Pirates) 32-19, 3.0 games up in GCL Northeast Division

  • SS Thairo Estrada: 1-4, 3 K, 1 SB, 1 CS, 1 HBP, 1 E (throwing)
  • C Luis Torrens: 2-5, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 K, 1 SB, 1 PB — 13 hits in his last 38 at-bats (.342)
  • DH Miguel Andujar: 3-4, 1 R, 2 2B, 1 RBI — 22-for-55 (.400) with seven doubles and two homers during his 14-game hitting streak
  • LF Nathan Mikolas: 1-2, 2 BB, 1 K, 1 E (fielding) — threw a runner out at the plate
  • RHP Dayton Dawe: 1 IP, zeroes, 2 K, 2/0 GB/FB
Categories : Down on the Farm

75 Comments»

  1. forensic says:

    Wow, the Binghamton Mets have a .625 winning % (80-48 record). That’s pretty impressive. Guess the Mets have some good prospects in AA.

  2. trr says:

    What the hell is a “Rail Rider”, anyway?

  3. Richard Leo says:

    Brady Lail’s control is unbelievable

    • Angelo says:

      Just try to remember that Lail is 20 years old in the lowest level of the minors. Maybe I’ve said this already. It’s just much less impressive when you consider his age. It would be great if he was doing it in Low-A or if he was 17-18.

      • Richard Leo says:

        less impressive not equal as not impressive
        plus he is not old for the level
        and no one call him the best pitching prospect in th farm

        • Angelo says:

          20 years old for a good prospect is old for the GCL. But I agree with everything else you said.

          • Mac says:

            He just turned 20 about a week ago. This is his 19 year old season. His first full pro season.

            I think the point should be more to take all GCL stats with an especially large grain of salt instead of Lail being old for the level. He’s not young for the level, but I feel that you are exaggerating the point by going only with his age.

            • Cool Lester Smooth says:

              Exactly; Lail’s not “old,” he’s just not young enough for GCL stats to be at all relevant.

            • Angelo says:

              GCL stats don’t mean much regardless of age. Just poor indicators of future success overall. I’m going to say I was off my game last night because I somehow ignored that he literally just turned 20. In other words, you’re right, I’m wrong.

  4. Bo Knows says:

    I wonder where this Fierro guy goes? The Mexican league is mentioned even on the Milb.com as a AAA level league, So if he’s been that impressive at that young an age, would it be best to have him in Trenton to polish his game?

    • Laz says:

      Probably they start him low and move him up. Aceves started in Tampa, and Banuelos started even lower.

      • Bo Knows says:

        I can’t imagine it’d be any lower than Tampa then for maybe a 1/2 a season then. He’s older and more experienced than Banuelos was when he signed, and his year so far is a little better with the punch-outs, and much better with the walks than Ace ever did in the Mexican League (Didn’t have as many innings as Ace did though)

        • Angelo says:

          I doubt he starts any higher than Tampa. He might even start in Low-A with the idea of moving him up quickly to Tampa once he shows he can handle the level. Just thinking of players the Yankees have drafted in recent memory, O’Brien and Refsnyder were considered to play in leagues which rivaled High-A, yet the Yankees started them in Low-A and didn’t move them up until they had enough success in Charleston.

          I know the draft is different than international signings and every player is different, etc. I guess Tampa would make the most sense, but I don’t know enough about the guy yet to make an informed enough opinion. History suggests that he won’t debut in Double-A though.

          • Bo Knows says:

            O’Brien and Refsnyder were college players, college ball is not anywhere close to High A caliber players. A very talented College player should be able to at the very least handle High A within his 1st full year, but that’s the best of the best. (I know that the tone of this sounds harsh, I am not trying to sound mean; it’s just how it is coming out written)

            This a different situation because the MLB and most recognize this league as a AAA caliber, which is far and above more difficult than any college circuit.

            All that said, I can see them putting him in Charleston, though it is probably be a situation similar to De Paula, build his innings so he can be promoted mid-season before being let loose. Hopefully though he has some legit velocity.

            • Angelo says:

              I understand that the Mexican league is comparable to AAA and that it’s superior to any college level league. The SEC is considered to be a league comparable to High-A. Maybe it’s slightly worse, but these aren’t my words.

              • Bo Knows says:

                Never heard anyone compare any college division to A+ ball, I could understand regular A, but not A+.

              • Tremont says:

                No college league is comparable to High-A or even Low-A. The SEC (the best league) may be comparable to the NY-Penn.

                • Cool Lester Smooth says:

                  I was gonna say, not everyone from the SEC gets drafted; much less reaches Hi-A.

                  • Angelo says:

                    You’re right. I think maybe I misunderstood. Maybe what I read suggested that the top players in the SEC should be able to compete in High-A almost immediately.

                    I know for sure that I read something regarding this. Just not sure exactly what. I’ll take the fall though.

            • Mac says:

              The Mexican League is listed as a AAA league simply because it’s a foreign professional league. Not because they are comparing the levels of competition.

              It’s not AAA competition. Maybe a bit above AA, though I think that’s dubious. Looking at JoVA, he lost about 100 points in OPS in AA and 200 points in AAA compared to Mexico.

              If Mexico was a legit AAA league, you’d see guys coming from their to MLB fairly regularly because they’d be just shy of MLB talent. The better players would be AAAA caliber, like in AAA. In reality it happens pretty infrequently.

          • Mac says:

            I agree that they’ve likely to start him out lower than higher. Err on the side of caution and the worst thing that happens is he spends a few weeks blowing away inferior competition while getting his feet yet in US ball.

            There are plenty of advanced IFA guys to compare him to as well as draft guys. DePaula is one recent example who they started a little low (though the competition caught up with him quickly upon being advanced). Guys like Mustelier and Garcia are a little different as older position players, maybe, but also started low and worked their ways up quickly. JoVa did start in AA.

            Part of it probably depends on whether the Yankees see him as a RP or SP. If they want him to start they have to get him through the lineup multiple times, build his arm strength, maybe improve his secondary stuff (I haven’t seen a scouting report or him pitch).

  5. vicki says:

    so i guess sanchez was just bored in tampa?

  6. tj says:

    is fierro a starter?

  7. Robinson Tilapia says:

    I love it when we pluck players like this from the Mexican league. There’s more than one way to skin a cat.

  8. Angelo says:

    Part of me wants an “Austin Aune Ks watch.” Striking out half the time is pretty impressive and I’m usually too lazy to see his total number so far.

    …Apparently it’s 63 strike outs in 34 games. Damn. I’m not even sure if that includes today.

    • Samuel says:

      Enough with Austin Aune and his strikeouts.

      The kid was moved to a different position (not an excuse but reality), and they probably worked to change his swing and if so, he is working hard to implement what is being taught and not worrying about results.

      I have spoken to many kids throughout the minors who, when I ask them why lower on field results, they usually say they are being instructed with something new, and told not to worry about the results.

      When taught something new, teams want the kids to work on the new adjustments to their swing rather than fall back to what was comfortable to them. Even if the results suffer.

      This happens more often in the GCL and with guys the organization believes has a legit shot. They usually do not work much with filler guys and those who aren’t top picks. Normally, the Yankees let kids work any issues out themselves, but a few times they do implement some changes early on.

      So I suggest to let the kid play, see how he progresses next year before you keep mocking him. No one knows the entire story.

      • Mac says:

        There’s no reason to spin this as normal development. Certainly he still has a chance to develop and it may have at least something to do with adjustments. However, this is truly awful.

        Your anecdotal points about excuses made by kids don’t tell us anything about the historical precedence for such truly awful performance. Some kids struggle with adjustments, but that doesn’t mean they K 50% of the time and put up a 26 wRC+ (possibly both worse after last night) while repeating the lowest stateside level in affiliated ball. If you look at a sample of guys who put up that kind of performance what is the success rate (however defined) compared to samples of guys who did better at that level?

        (And while adjustments are a possible explanation for his struggles, there’s no reason to conclude he is working hard and only struggling due to adjustments. Could just as easily be related to his work ethic whether because of lack of interest in baseball, overconfidence, substance abuse, lifestyle choices as a new millionaire, or pure laziness. Could also be his mental makeup and ability to deal with failure. Unless you have some sort of inside info there is no reason to shove your speculation down people’s throats telling them what they should and shouldn’t comment on. This is certainly an atrocious development for one of the Yankees more promising young prospects.)

        • Samuel says:

          I knew your self imposed not going to comment on my posts would end rather quickly, so thanks for replying.

          I am not trying to spin anything Mac, but am reporting what I have heard countless times from kids in the minors. And when I do hear this, I almost always confirm this with the teams hitting coach. Only time I DID NOT confirm was this year with a kid from Daytona in the FSL, as I did not have a media badge to get in the clubhouse.

          I was giving a POSSIBLE explanation for Aune’s horrific K rate, and that it really has garnered enough jokes on this site. Just let the kid play. You’re correct is saying it could be a myriad of many other factors, none that we know about. (As an aside, I have not seen Aune play yet, nor spoken with anybody in the know.)

          Is Austin Aune not panning out really going to affect anything the Yankees do two, three or five years from now? Unless they are a top 10 pick, no one prospect does, although Gary Sanchez does appear to be the biggest NEED prospect in the system now.

          I use the anecdotal evidence due to the knowledge that it does occur. And NO ONE can know ALL the times it happens, so it is virtually impossible for anyone to know what the percentages of this happening and working/not working.

          However, when I coach sometimes I tell a kid who might be an extreme pull hitter, to hit the ball the other way every at bat, and not to worry about the results. This is during games. I don’t want them to walk (unless four pitches are obviously way out of the zone), but to look outer third, wait and attempt to hit it the other way. Amazing the results which occur.

          While this is at the high school level, this plan would work quite well at every level of baseball. However, I am not saying this is happening with Aune, but it certainly is possible.

          But what I do know is all your arguments related to a certain kids prospect status are related to age/level, repeating level and nothing much else. If it doesn’t occur as a sabermetric percentage ranking compared to historical rates, it likely doesn’t enter your thought process.

          My main point is to let the kids play, and if two years down the road, Aune is still shit with the bat, then the jokes should continue.

          Like they do with Bichette.

      • Cool Lester Smooth says:

        Yeah, I’m figuring the kid is undergoing a massive swing overhaul right now. We should give him until at least next year before worrying about results; that’s why he’s still in the GCL.

      • Angelo says:

        You’re reaching with this comment. I don’t hate the guy. This is probably my first comment regarding his failures this season.

        When a player strikes out close to 50% of the time it’s very alarming and it’s going to catch peoples attention. That sort of thing is inevitable. Especially when all of the other numbers suggests he’s having no success with the bat this year. These numbers are unprecedented for what a Yankee prospect has done in I don’t know how long.

        And I’m not mocking him. I’m just interested in his historically bad season. There’s a big difference between the two.

        • Samuel says:

          If that was really your first comment about him, then I apologize. No offense intended to you directly.

          I usually try to keep comments positive about players, and avoid the negative nit picking stuff so many on here use. I usually believe a player can improve at most deficiencies they may have within the game.

  9. Lukaszek says:

    Is Charleston a pitcher-friendly ballpark? I notice Greg Bird is .332/.476/.615 on the road, and only .238/.367/.396 in Charleston

    • D-Lite says:

      Yep. The Joe is pretty extreme pitcher’s park. Apparently the wind is blowing in all the time there.

      • Lukaszek says:

        I’m intrigued by how well his 1.101 OPS on the road could translate to Double-A or even Triple-A

        • Bo Knows says:

          Let him get through Tampa first.

          Anyway, Trenton and Scranton are even worse pitcher parks, so if he hits 15+ homers there his power is probably a legit 70+ grade

        • Angelo says:

          We’re not even sure how successful he would be in Tampa. I think he’ll do fine in Tampa right now, but minor league numbers and talent don’t work that way.

          Low-A is the lowest level of full season league competition. Double-A is far more superior and Triple-A is filled with guys that have at least made their mlb debuts. Bird isn’t quite on that level yet.

    • Bo Knows says:

      All of the Yankee minor league parks are extremely pitcher friendly

      • emac2 says:

        I wonder if that helps or hurts overall. Hitting prospects look worse in terms of trade value and pitchers have a hard time adjusting to Yankee stadium.

        • Samuel says:

          Double A to Trenton this year for AA playoffs.

          • Cool Lester Smooth says:

            Have you heard that for a fact?

            It would be pretty ballsy, but it’s not like Trenton has anyone blocking him and the Nats jump people to AA all the time.

            • Samuel says:

              I have not heard anything, but my own opinion. I think it wouldn’t be as ballsy as you say.

              I feel it would be the best move. Bird obviously is too good for Low A, and why promote him to Tampa for the last couple weeks? What is that going to do for him in the intense heat of Florida after his first season of pro ball?

              Why not let him air it out in crunch time in AA? See what the kid has. I would love to see it as I go there quite a bit.

              The organization has always liked the kids talent, work ethic, attitude and ability to stay calm. I remember last year, Bird would have a bad at bat, and then say, “I know what I did to get myself out. I know what adjustment I have to make next time.”

              The kid already knows the in game between pitcher and batter. That is why Bird is going to be really good.

              And it appears nobody is pitching to him anymore in Low A games, and he is taking his walks, and learning more and more.

              I feel they should let him get a chance at a much higher level. Tampa for

              • Mac says:

                It would be pretty “ballsy.” Possible, but ballsy.

                Certainly one can argue either way, but there’s no objective reason he has more to gain from jumping up two levels to high minors competition for a few weeks than jumping up one level. Especially when he could spend time in Tampa and then always make the jump for the playoffs (Austin did that last season, though he spent much more time in Tampa.)

                You’re unlikely to learn much in a few weeks. Just like you don’t learn much when a prospect comes up on fire or ice to MLB for a few weeks.

                • Samuel says:

                  Since the Tamp season has two weeks remaining, what good would it doe him to go there and not Trenton where he can get a week/10 days to get adjusted to AA pitching before the playoffs?

                  I meant not as ballsy because Bird’s maturity level is well above most 20 year old kids, and he could handle the mental part of AA regarding adjustments/failure than most kids his age.

                  • Cool Lester Smooth says:

                    Another reason that it’s not entirely out of the question is that he is already 20 years old. It’s not like he’s your typical 18/19 year old top prospect in Low-A.

                    • Angelo says:

                      Nitpicking, but 18-19 year old is not typical even for a top prospect in Low-A. It does happen though.

                    • Samuel says:

                      Heathcott, Murphy, Flores, Sanchez and Bird all began at age 19 or younger in Low A.

                    • Cool Lester Smooth says:

                      Well, the typical 1B prospect that people salivate over like we do Bird is usually 18/19.

                    • Angelo says:

                      Yes, Samuel. And their are many more examples of 20 year olds that are top prospects in Low-A or at least started the year there. I didn’t say it never happens.

        • Samuel says:

          Scouts and organizations are less impressed with numbers than they are approach, swing, ability to adjust etc.

          Most kids up to 22 (Bird is 20 and in 1st full pro season), really don’t hit for much power since they aren’t fully matured on a physical level till they hit 27-29 years of age.

          That is why there are projections based upon swing, hip rotation, etc. to determine how they will hit for HRs at ML level.

  10. Weezy F. Reefer says:

    Yeicok Calderon was playing 3rd for some reason and was pretty good at it biooootttcchhh!!!

  11. Get Phelps Up says:

    I would really like to see the GCL championship series be between the two GCL Yankees teams.

  12. Danny says:

    Mitchell looked good tonight, seemed to sacrifice velo for control, was mainly 90-94, but the breaking ball & change up were solid. His line doesn’t do him justice, he looked really good.

  13. Rick says:

    Unrealistic to expect Sanchez to join the big league club in the second half of next season?

    • Bryan says:

      It could happen if he destroys AA and AAA next year. There’s a reason Murphy SHOULD move up to NY come September 1.

  14. Fin says:

    We are all reaching for players.. the minor league is producing shit right now. The best players (so called) in the low minors, didn’t take steps forward, they stayed the same or regressed. Bird is now the most exciting prospect, damn. Bad system.

    • Bryan says:

      Eh. It wasn’t a great season. But we some decent production from some OF prospects like Mesa and Almonte. Adams has failed pretty miserably but he was never a really big prospect to begin with. We had two SP’s in Phelps and Warren prove they are MLB caliber at the worst….and neither of them were considered top.

      Murphy was a decent prospect and has gone from fodder to potential starter. Sanchez is on a slower path (justifiably for defense) and his offense is legit so no worries there. Williams has been hitting real well since the All Star Break and is now in AA. De Paula has been solid all season and next year could be our best SP prospect. Campos, for reasons unknown, was hindered to only 85-90 innings and has held his own the entire season. Ramirez did very well.

      So no. I don’t think our system is shit now.

      • Cool Lester Smooth says:

        Campos had a severe elbow injury last May that knocked him out for the season. Understandably, they’re taking it slowly as he comes back.

    • CS Yankee says:

      Exactly how is Bird, who is at low-A, more exciting than Murphy or Sanchez at AAA & AA?

      I think he should finish at Tampa as they have nobody special blocking him, however there are about 7 or 8 guys that seem a safer and more valuable bet than Bird.

      • Cool Lester Smooth says:

        Exactly, Sanchez is Bird’s age and is playing in AA right now with a 6.2% lower K% on the year; he’s a much, much nicer prospect, and I like Bird.

        Also, Heathcott stayed healthy almost all year, and dodged the knife, while cutting down on his strikeouts, maintaining most of his power in Trenton and had been lighting it up in the second half. This was a very good year for him, regardless of the fact that he only finished with a 104 wRC+.

        Williams has come on strong in the second have. Hell, even my first prospect crush, Dellin Betances, is looking like a major league player again.

        The only prospects who have really fallen on their face are Austin, who, from what Law wrote, was apparently trying to play through the wrist injury that has shelved him for the past month, and Gumbs, who was always going to be a bit of a wild card.

    • Rick says:

      How is Bird more exciting than Sanchez? Even Williams or Heathcott? The demise of our minor league system is so overstated. Yea, I get it, we’re not the Cardinals. Oh well. We still have some young exciting prospects. The problem is the way the Major League team went about rebuilding. We were 3 years away from prospects knocking on the door. They tried to fix it all the first year.

      • Mac says:

        I’m not sure that the Yankees expected anything but depth from prospects this season.

        Even after several injuries I’m not sure a single position prospect opened the season on the 25 man roster. There were none in the rotation. Just a couple of guys at the end of the bullpen.
        Prospects have really only been used as injury replacements and low-leverage RPs this season. Guys like Romine, Adams, Almonte, CoJo, Nuno, Warren, Claiborne, Betances.

        The Yankees have just been hit with bad injury luck and some bad performance luck on top of it. They could well be right in the division race with expected contributions from at least a few of their injured guys like Tex, Granderson, Jeter, Cervelli, and Youkilis or their underperformers like CC, Pettitte, Hughes, and Hafner. (I realize that realistic expectations are not perfect health and great seasons all around. Still better health than this, though.)

  15. nick says:

    Jose Pirela deserves a shoutout, 5 for 5 last night for trenton with a 2B, 4 RBI. He’s 23, so he should be one that is at least on the radar as a guy who can play multiple positions.

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