Chasen Shreve can give the Yanks four dominant relievers with a return to early 2015 form

(Al Bello/Getty)
(Al Bello/Getty)

For most of last season, Chasen Shreve was one of the Yankees’ best and most reliable relievers. He stepped into the seventh inning role when Andrew Miller visited the DL, then slid back into a more traditional middle reliever’s role when Miller returned. Regardless of role, he was excellent for the first four months. It looked like the Yankees had landed themselves a low-profile bullpen gem.

Shreve had a 1.77 ERA (3.16 FIP) on the day of the trade deadline but struggled in August and totally collapsed down the stretch in September. He finished the season with a 3.09 ERA (4.92 FIP) in 58.1 innings after allowing four homers and six walks in his final five innings. His walk rate in August and September was a way too high 18.8%. Yuck.

Joe Girardi always seemed to be one reliever short down the stretch, which contributed to the Yankees falling out of first place. Miller, Dellin Betances, and Justin Wilson were pitching every day it seemed. Shreve was no longer trustworthy in big spots. Unsurprisingly, Girardi said figuring out what happened to Shreve is a priority this offseason after the Yankees lost the wildcard game.

“I think Shreve has a chance to be better because of the struggles he went through and (he) learned a lot about himself,” said Girardi at his end-of-season press conference. “For the first couple of months he was really good and a huge part of his bullpen. We have to figure out what happened, mechanically. There were probably some things that were a little bit off … I think it has a chance to really help him.”

Girardi indicated Shreve had a mechanical problem, which is always possible. Fatigue could have been an issue too. Yes, Shreve only threw 58.1 innings after averaging 65 innings per season in the minors from 2011-14, but high-leverage MLB innings are a different animal. They can be much more mentally and physically taxing. It would be silly to dismiss fatigue as a possible explanation for Shreve’s fade.

Whatever the reason(s), Shreve’s fade has caused him to be overlooked for most of the offseason. The Yankees essentially replaced Wilson with Aroldis Chapmanan enormous upgrade despite what many want you to believe — and much of the talk about the remaining bullpen spots has focused on the shuttle relievers. Nick Rumbelow, Jacob Lindgren, James Pazos, Bryan Mitchell, Branden Pinder, guys like that.

Shreve has rarely been mentioned despite having more MLB success than all of those other guys combined. Relievers come and go, that’s what they do, but Shreve’s dominance early last year — and that’s not hyperbole, he was dominant for the first four months — has earned him another chance this coming season. The Yankees have to see if his mechanical issues have been corrected, if fatigue is no longer an issue.

The job Shreve held for much of last season is currently open on the 2016 roster. That is the No. 4 reliever behind the top three guys at the end of the game. Someone to pitch the sixth inning or fill-in when one of the other guys aren’t available. Those three guys for the late-innings are outstanding, that group has a chance to be historically great, but the middle innings are important too.

Given the current options on the roster, the best candidate to fill Chasen Shreve’s old role is, well, Chasen Shreve. He’s had sustained success at the MLB level — at least moreso than the other guys — and at his best, he’s a left-hander who can retire both righties and lefties, and rack up strikeouts. Getting Shreve back on track would take what looks to be a very good bullpen and make it even better.

Thanks to Chapman, Joe Girardi has more flexibility with Dellin Betances

(Rob Carr/Getty)
(Rob Carr/Getty)

In his eight seasons as Yankees manager, Joe Girardi has made it pretty clear he likes having defined roles for his relievers. He likes having a set eighth inning guy plus a set seventh inning guy whenever possible. Every manager makes weird moves from time to time, but considering the Yankees have by far the best bullpen WPA during those eight seasons, Girardi’s reliever management is among the best.

Next season Girardi will have another elite reliever at his disposal. The Dellin Betances/Andrew Miller tandem was as good as it gets in 2015, and now the Yankees have added Aroldis Chapman to the mix following this week’s trade. Those three are among the five best relievers in the world by almost every objective measure. Chapman’s off-the-field history is pretty ugly. On the mound, he’s untouchable.

“Given the circumstances that exist, the price point on the acquisition has been modified. We felt this was an opportunity to add a big arm to our bullpen,” said Brian Cashman during a conference call following the trade. The Yankees were able to get Chapman without trading a significant prospect and without subtracting from their big league roster. In pure baseball terms, it was a fantastic trade.

It remains to be seen how Girardi will deploy his new end-game arms, though I’m guessing Chapman will replace Miller as the closer. Miller doesn’t seem to care, and really, there’s no wrong answer. As long as both are pitching in high-leverage spots, it’s fine. Girardi’s a good bullpen manager. I trust he’ll have his best relievers on the mound in the most important situations as often as possible.

Beyond the ninth inning, the addition of Chapman allows Girardi to be more flexible with Betances. He was already pretty flexible with Dellin, using him for four or more outs when the situation called for it, and now he’ll have even more freedom in the middle innings. Girardi can use Betances for two innings today knowing he can rest him tomorrow while still having Miller and Chapman available. That sort of thing.

Dellin’s workload the last two seasons and the compounding effect of all those high stress innings does worry me going forward. It’s not cause for panic or anything like that, but Betances has thrown a lot of intense innings these last two years. They take a toll. Adding Chapman does figure to help lighten the load on Betances next year because there are more elite relievers to soak up the innings. Justin Wilson was great, but he’s not Chapman.

A reliever throwing two innings at a time is not a bad thing in and of itself. Doing it as often as Betances has done at times over the last two years is when it can be a problem. Pitching is inherently dangerous. Pitching while fatigued is even more dangerous. Girardi can still use Betances for multiple innings, but now he’ll have an easier time giving him that extra day of rest when necessary.

In all likelihood, Girardi will use one guy in the seventh inning (Betances?), one guy in the eighth (Miller?), and one guy in the ninth (Chapman?). That’s what his history suggests. Maybe he’ll match up with Betances and Miller from time to time, but assigning innings is his thing. If he’s open to it, the addition of Chapman gives Girardi a little more freedom to use Betances in the middle innings while still giving him the proper rest.

Andrew Miller on Aroldis Chapman trade: “I’m here to help in any capacity that I can”

(Jim McIsaac/Getty)
(Jim McIsaac/Getty)

Earlier this week, the Yankees acquired Aroldis Chapman from the Reds in one of their classic out of nowhere trades. The whole thing went down in about an hour, from first rumor to press release. The Yankees added Chapman without giving up significant prospects or dealing anyone off their MLB roster.

Right now the Yankees plan to have Chapman join Andrew Miller and Dellin Betances in the bullpen, forming the most dominant reliever trio in history. That’s not hyperbole either. The early-to-mid-2000s Astros had a great bullpen threesome in Billy Wagner, Octavio Dotel, and Brad Lidge, but not even they were as dominant as Chapman, Miller, and Betances.

My guess is Chapman will take over as the closer next season, mostly because he’s been one of the best closers in the game for a few years now. Miller was awesome in that role last season, so it’s not like he’s being replaced because he didn’t do the job, it just seems like Chapman will get the ninth inning based on reputation. And Miller is perfectly fine with that. Here’s what he told Brendan Kuty after the Chapman deal:

“I signed with the Yankees to win and I’m not stupid, he’s a heck of a pitcher,” Miller told NJ Advance Media in a phone interview Tuesday. “This is what I signed up for. I signed up to play for the Yankees, to win championships, and if (general manager Brian) Cashman and the Steinbrenners and whoever is part of the decision-making process thinks this is part of the answer, and that this is the way to go about it, that’s fine by me.”

Miller never did make any kind of stink about being the closer last season. He came to Spring Training and said he would do whatever the team asked, and it just so happened they needed him to close. “For what they’re paying me, I’ll do anything,” he said in early-May, after Joe Girardi finally declared him the closer.

Reports circulated saying Chapman wants to close when it appeared he was headed to the Dodgers a few weeks ago, though I’m not sure how true that is. Saves do pay, though I think at this point everyone knows Chapman is great and he’ll get paid accordingly in free agency next winter regardless of his 2016 saves total. That said, even the possibility of losing money due to a lack of saves may be enough to make Chapman uncomfortable.

As far as I’m concerned, there is no wrong answer in the late innings. Girardi could use Chapman or Miller or Betances to close and it would be perfectly fine with me. How could anyone think there’s a wrong answer here? They’re all great. If Chapman is more comfortable closing, then let him close and put him in the best position to succeed. Works for me.

As for Betances, what does he think about the Chapman addition? “I’m thinking about the game where we each pitch an inning and K all nine hitters we face,” he said to John Harper. Mmmhmmm.

Yankees should target multi-inning relievers to protect against fragile rotation

(Tom Szczerbowski/Getty)
Can Nova be a two or three-inning reliever? (Tom Szczerbowski/Getty)

Do you know who led the Yankees in innings this past season? CC Sabathia. He threw 167.1 of them. That’s the fewest innings thrown by the team leader in a non-strike season in franchise history. Masahiro Tanaka led the Yankees by averaging 6.42 innings per start with Michael Pineda a distant second at 5.95. No other Yankee was over the 5.85 AL average.

Length from the rotation was a big problem last season. We saw it daily and talked about it nearly as often. The bullpen was being asked to get 10-12 outs a night, it seemed. Even if the Yankees do manage to add another starter this offseason, they’ll head into next season with largely the same starting staff, only a year older and with somehow with more health concerns thanks to Nathan Eovaldi‘s season-ending elbow issue.

Getting more innings and length from the rotation is necessary but probably unrealistic. Even when healthy, Eovaldi struggled to complete six innings. Joe Girardi was quick to pull Sabathia after two times through the lineup, and you can be sure Luis Severino will be handled with kid gloves. A few weeks ago Brian Cashman said Ivan Nova was the starter most likely to give the team 200 innings in 2016, which made me laugh until I realized it was true.

The Yankees were able to alleviate the heavy bullpen workload last season with the Scranton shuttle. They always had a fresh reliever or two available because they were swapping out arms almost daily. The Yankees could use the same plan of attack next season — in fact, I’m pretty sure they will — but that only helps so much. Those guys only fill the last bullpen spot or two. They aren’t the core relievers.

Going forward, the best approach may be to load up on potential multi-inning relievers, guys who can go three innings or 50 pitches every three days or so. A long man, but someone good enough to pitch with a small lead (or deficit). The Yankees had the perfect guy for this job in Adam Warren, but he’s gone now. In fact, his new team, the Cubs, now have Warren, Trevor Cahill, and Travis Wood in the bullpen. All three can go multiple innings.

Either the Cubs are ahead of the curve — starters in general are throwing fewer innings each year, so a bullpen of one-inning relievers won’t cut it much longer — or it’s just a coincidence. (It’s the former. Theo Epstein & Co. are pretty smart.) Finding relievers who can throw multiple innings and are good enough to see high-leverage work is really hard. Warren was crazy valuable. Find two or three guys like him will be damn near impossible.

Among players currently in the organization, Nova and Bryan Mitchell stand out as the best candidates for a multi-inning relief role in 2016. Nova has good stuff and rather than stick him in a one-inning role, why not let him face 9-12 batters each time out? That may be the best way to maximize his production. Plus it would keep him stretched out a bit in case he’s needed in the rotation. Same applies to Mitchell.

Looking at free agent possibilities … yeesh. First of all, you have to find guys who probably aren’t good enough to start — if they are good enough to start, they’ll get jobs as starters — but are good enough to throw two or three innings at a time in relief. Tim Lincecum stands out as a candidate for that role, though he’s coming off hip surgery and may not be ready for Spring Training. Joe Blanton? Don’t laugh, he had a 2.04 ERA (2.56 FIP) in 57.1 innings across 32 relief appearances in 2015. Justin Masterson? Carlos Villanueva?

In a perfect world, the bullpen would be something like Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller, three guys who can give you two or three innings at a clip and 100-110 innings over the full season, a shuttle reliever, and a mop-up guy for games that get out of hand. That’s not going to happen though. It doesn’t change the fact the Yankees probably won’t get many innings from the rotation next season.

The one-inning middle reliever model is slowly dying. Relievers who can throw multiple innings are no longer luxuries. They’re becoming necessities.

Warren and Wilson trades mean Yankees are now short on options for important innings

Will Mitchell be the new Warren? (David Banks/Getty)
Will Mitchell be the new Warren? (David Banks/Getty)

Somewhat surprisingly, the Yankees traded away both Adam Warren and Justin Wilson on back-to-back days last week. I say somewhat surprisingly because although Warren and Wilson never felt untouchable, at least not to me, it didn’t seem like they would be moved given their effectiveness and years of cheap control. Both were valuable members of the staff in 2015.

The Yankees did trade both though, and regardless of how you feel about the trades, you don’t have to try too hard to understand them. Warren was traded for 25-year-old middle infielder who has already gone to three All-Star Games and is signed affordably for another four years. Wilson was dealt for two Triple-A starting pitcher prospects to rebuild depth.

I understand the trades, though that doesn’t change the fact the Yankees traded away two pretty good pitchers who were expected to throw important innings next season. There was always a chance Warren could have ended up in the rotation, but, at the very least, he and Wilson were two of the team’s four best relievers. They’d be two of the three best on many teams.

“You lost two really important pieces,” said Joe Girardi to Ryan Hatch. “Wilson did a tremendous job in the seventh inning and Adam went between starter and bullpen, and was the guy that we could turn to in the bullpen and either be a seventh, eighth, or ninth if we didn’t have that guy … Obviously I’m going to miss Adam. There’s a relationship there. But to get something good we had to give up something good.”

Soon after the trades, Nick Ashbourne pointed out Warren and Wilson combined to be Francisco Liriano this past season, and that kind of production is not easy to replace. Are the Yankees good at building bullpens? Oh yes, absolutely. They’ve been very good at it in recent years. I’m pretty confident they can adequately replace Warren and Wilson. I’m just really curious to see how they do it.

Internal options are plentiful and lately Plan A has been trying to find help from within. To me, the trades represent big opportunities for Bryan Mitchell and Jacob Lindgren. Mitchell will have a chance to step right into that swingman role Warren filled so capably. Lindgren is the obvious candidate to replace Wilson as the lefty setup guy who can throw full innings. The Warren and Wilson trades can be viewed as votes of confidence for Mitchell and Lindgren.

At the same time, it is only December 15th, so the Yankees still have several weeks to look outside the organization for help, and I’m sure they will. At this time last year I don’t think any Yankees fans even knew Chasen Shreve existed. I know I didn’t. The Yankees picked him up in early-January and he had five really good months in pinstripes. I would honestly be stunned if they don’t bring in some sort of big league pitching help between now and Spring Training.

Will that soon-to-be-acquired pitching depth plus internal options like Mitchell, Lindgren, and all the other relievers on the 40-man roster adequately replace Warren and Wilson? Maybe! Who knows though. Heck, 2016 Warren and Wilson might not replace 2015 Warren and Wilson. Relievers are notoriously unpredictable. The Yankees believe they can replace those two though. The trades wouldn’t have been made otherwise.

Losing Warren and Wilson is pretty scary, especially since none of the shuttle relievers impressed this summer and no one in the rotation seems capable of going 6+ innings consistently. I’d be lying if I said I was comfortable with the bullpen as is, even with Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller holding down the late innings. Lots of games are lost in the middle innings. We’re not going to know whether the Yankees adequately replaced Warren and Wilson until the season starts, but, right now, it’s clear there’s work that needs to be done to replace two high-leverage arms.

“Are those guys in place yet? No,” said Girardi when asked about replacing Warren and Wilson, “but I think they will be by the time we start the season.”

Dingers, Inherited Runners & Challenges [2015 Season Review]

Gardner hit seven three-run homers in 2015. (Presswire)
Gardner hit seven three-run homers in 2015. (Presswire)

Every year when I plan out the Season Review series, I always end up with more topics than posts. I start out rather ambitiously, then I run out of gas a few weeks later. We’re all sick of discussing 2015, right? The offseason is in full swing and we’re all looking ahead to 2016.

Anyway, there are a few weird statistical quirks I want to look at as part of the Season Review. They’re not worth their own individual posts so I’m going to just lump them together. We’ll look at these now, then next week we’ll wrap the whole Season Review thing up with some minor league reviews and that’ll be that. Away we go.

Three-Run Dingers

It was fun to get back to calling the Yankees the Bronx Bombers unironically this season. The Yankees hit only 144 home runs in 2013, 101 fewer than they hit in 2012. That’s the largest year-to-year decline in baseball history. The Yankees improved in 2013 and hit … 147 home runs. The team rebounded to hit 212 homers in 2015, the fourth most in baseball. Only the Blue Jays (232), Astros (230), and Orioles (217) hit more.

While watching the season play out, it felt like the Yankees hit an inordinate number of three-run home runs. Especially Brian McCann. Is it just me, or does it seem like the guy hits nothing but three-run homers? (He hit a team high seven this year.) The Yankees led baseball with 40 three-run dingers in 2015. Forty! Know who was second? The Rockies, Phillies, Astros, and Blue Jays. They each hit 23. The Yankees hit 17 more three-run homers than any other team this summer. They nearly doubled the second place teams.

The last team to hit 40+ three-run home runs was the 1996 Mariners (42). Heck, the last team to hit 30+ three-run homers was the 2007 Indians (30). Hitting three-run home runs is not a skill. Hitting home runs is a skill, but coming to the plate with two guys on base is not. This is just one of those weird things. The Yankees hit a lot of home runs this year in general, and they just so happened to hit a bunch with two men on base.

By the way, the Yankees ranked sixth in solo homers (115), eighth in two-run homers (50), and second in grand slams (seven) in 2015. The Giants hit nine grand slams and eight three-run homers this season. Weird.

Inherited Runners

The Yankees had a really good bullpen this past season, though they only stranded 29% of inherited runners, which is basically league average (30%). Here are the team’s relievers who inherited at least ten base-runners this season, via Baseball Reference:

Name IP G IR IS IS%
Justin Wilson* 61.0 74 44 7 16%
Chasen Shreve* 58.1 59 43 15 35%
Dellin Betances 84.0 74 41 11 27%
Adam Warren 131.1 43 17 4 24%
Chris Martin 20.2 24 15 7 47%
Esmil Rogers 33.0 18 15 7 47%
Nick Rumbelow 15.2 17 13 3 23%
Andrew Miller* 61.2 60 12 2 17%
Branden Pinder 27.2 25 10 5 50%

No real surprise here. Justin Wilson, Chasen Shreve, and Dellin Betances were Joe Girardi‘s firemen this year. Andrew Miller was married to the ninth inning, so those three were the guys Girardi turned to when he need an out(s) with men on base. They all inherited way more runners than the team’s other relievers. Wilson did a fantastic job stranding runners. Betances was slightly better than average and Shreve slightly worse.

What about the other side of the inherited runners coin? Which starters received the most help from the bullpen and which the least? Here’s the bequeathed runner data, again via Baseball Reference:

Name IP G GS BQR BQS BQS%
Nathan Eovaldi 154.1 27 27 31 8 26%
Adam Warren 131.1 43 17 27 5 19%
CC Sabathia* 167.1 29 29 22 7 32%
Michael Pineda 160.2 27 27 18 5 28%
Bryan Mitchell 29.2 20 2 16 6 38%
Chris Capuano* 40.2 22 4 14 5 36%
Ivan Nova 94.0 17 17 9 4 44%
Luis Severino 62.1 11 11 4 0 0%
Masahiro Tanaka 154.0 24 24 4 2 50%
Chase Whitley 19.1 4 4 3 2 66%

Nathan Eovaldi, CC Sabathia, and Michael Pineda all hovered right around the team/MLB average. Believe it or not, Masahiro Tanaka was taken out of a game in the middle of an inning only six times in 24 starts this year, hence the low number of bequeathed runners.

Adam Warren, on the other hand, got a lot of help from the bullpen. They did a real nice job stranding runners for him. If they’d allowed inherited runners to scored at the team average 29% rate, Warren’s ERA would go from 3.29 to 3.84. Ivan Nova, Chris Capuano, and Bryan Mitchell didn’t get much help from the bullpen either, but they didn’t leave a ton of men on base in their limited innings.

Not all inherited runners are the same — inheriting a man on first with two outs is much different than inheriting a runner on third with no outs, for example — and as far as I know, there’s no place that breaks down all the separate inherited runner situations. That would really tell use who did the best job stranding runners. Overall, the Yankees were a league average club when it came to leaving dudes on base this year.

(Presswire)
(Presswire)

Replay Challenges

Once again, the Yankees had an extremely high success rate with replay challenges in 2015. The Yankees had 24 of 32 calls overturned on replay this year, or 75%. That was easily the best success rate in the game. The Mariners were a distant second at 71.8%. No other team was over 70%. Credit goes to baseball operations assistant Brett Weber, the guy in the clubhouse watching the video and telling the coaching staff whether to challenge.

Those 32 challenges were the ninth fewest in baseball. (The Rays and Tigers had the fewest challenges with 27 each while the Rangers had the most with 54.) That’s a lot of unused challenges. I wouldn’t be opposed to Girardi being a little more liberal with them going forward. Yeah, the success rate might drop, but it might help you win another game or two. Say a bang-bang play in the late innings of a close game. Weber might give you a thumbs down, but if it’s a really close play in an important spot, roll the dice and maybe the MLB folks in midtown see it differently.

Either way, the Yankees have been extremely successful with their challenges in the two years the system has been in place. (Last year they went 23-for-28, or 82.1%.) I’m not sure I’d call this a skill. I’d rather just say Weber is really good at his job, looking over the replays in a timely fashioning and advising the staff whether they should challenge. A few more Hail Mary challenges might not be a bad idea though. It’s okay to shoot from the hip once in a while.

Reliever usage data shows Joe Girardi is among very best at running a bullpen

(Tom Szczerbowski/Getty)
(Tom Szczerbowski/Getty)

Over the last few years I’ve been lucky enough to branch out beyond RAB and get an opportunity to write about all of baseball. That’s exposed me to all 30 fanbases through comment sections and Twitter and whatnot. Based on that exposure, I’ve come to three conclusions that apply to all fanbases:

  1. They all think their offense sucks at hitting with runners in scoring position.
  2. They all think their ace isn’t really an ace whenever he loses a random game.
  3. They all think their manager is a dolt based on his bullpen usage.

We’ve all seen remarks like that before, especially if you lurk in the RAB comments. Like every other manager, Joe Girardi has made baffling bullpen moves over the years — remember Andrew Bailey facing the middle of the Blue Jays order last month in what was essentially the Yankees’ last chance to stay in the AL East race? — but he’s generally been very good at running at bullpen.

Quantifying that is tough. Brian Cashman & Co. have given Girardi some pretty good relievers over the years — they’ve had at least two elite relievers every year since 2011 thanks to Mariano Rivera, David Robertson, Rafael Soriano, Dellin Betances, and Andrew Miller — which makes it easier to be successful, but it doesn’t guarantee anything. After all, even with two elite relievers, there are still five other relievers ready to be brought in at inopportune times.

In a piece at Grantland yesterday, Ben Lindbergh reintroduced an older stat called BMAR (Bullpen Management Above Random), which essentially tells you how well a manager used his bullpen based on leverage data. I recommend reading the piece for the gory details, but, in a nutshell, Lindbergh explains BMAR helps answer this question: “In light of the bullpen he had, how much better (in wOBA points allowed) were the relievers he did choose than the relievers he could’ve chosen at random?”

BMAR shows Girardi had the second best bullpen usage in baseball this season, behind only ex-Padres manager Bud Black, who was fired at midseason. Removing Black because of his small sample, Girardi was the best in the game at leveraging his relievers. His optimal usage was 37.2% compared to the league average of 18.2%. (So yes, based on BMAR, managers used the “correct” reliever less than 20% of the time on average, though BMAR assumes every reliever is available every game, which we know isn’t true.)

Lindbergh explains BMAR isn’t all that predictive year-to-year. It tends to fluctuate. However, Girardi is one of a handful of managers who have consistently ranked near the top of the BMAR leaderboard in recent seasons, along with Angels manager Mike Scioscia and Giants manager Bruce Bochy. Here is the top of the BMAR leaderboard from 2012-15:

BMAR 2012-15

Girardi was the very best in baseball at leveraging his relievers both in terms of wOBA advantage gained — that is, on average, how much better the reliever used is than everyone else in the bullpen — and percent of optimal usage. I know 28.8% optimal usage doesn’t sound like much, but no other manager who managed two full seasons from 2012-15 was above 25.7%. The league average from 2012-15 was 18.9%.

By no means is BMAR perfect. Like I said, it doesn’t adjust for who is and who isn’t available on a given day, and I’m not even sure if it’s possible to do that anyway. Relievers are unavailable all the time for reasons that are never made public. BMAR is a good overview stat that helps us quantify bullpen usage. The data matches up with what I’ve felt watching games over the years — Girardi and Bochy are very good, Terry Collins and Mike Matheny are very bad, etc. — so I feel it is at least on the right track.

The Yankees used their bullpen a ton this season and it was by design. Girardi tried to avoid letting his starters go through a lineup three times, and the Triple-A shuttle always gave him a fresh arm. I don’t think they can lean on their bullpen quite as much next year — asking the ‘pen to get 10-12 outs a night all summer doesn’t strike me as a sustainable strategy — but if they do, BMAR shows Girardi is as good as any manager in the game at using the right reliever in the right situation.