TiqIQ: Donnie Baseball Double Dip in the Bronx

By Greg Cohen and Jesse Lawrence, TiqIQ

When the Dodgers last won the World Series in New York City, a ticket to Game 4 could be had for $7.35, or less than the cost of a hot dog or a beer at the New Yankee Stadium. The last time the Dodgers visited the Bronx was for the 1981 World Series, and the face price for Yankees tickets in the in the Loge section of the old stadium was $20. Times have obviously changed, and for last year’s World Series, the minimum face price to see the Giants beat the Tigers was $110. For the second half of the Yankees vs. Dodgers doubleheader, though, there are a handful of tickets available for 1981 prices. As of 11:30am, the Yankees Ticket Exchange had tickets in section 239 for $21.

1981 was the year before Don Mattingly made his major league debut, and the last time the Yankees would see the post-season until his final year in 1995. The prospects of a managerial postseason for Mattingly in 2013 are low, and a rematch of the ’81 series even lower. The Dodgers enter the series last in the NL West, seven games out of the playoff hunt. The Yankees are surviving at third in the AL East. With Mattingly in the opposing dugout, though, the game will evoke memories even for those too young to remember 1981.

Mattingly only played two postseason games in Yankee Stadium, both in 1995. In those games, he batted .500 and led the team into Seattle with a good chance to return home for the ALCS. As we all now know, Edgar Martinez and Ken Griffey Jr. had other plans. Despite the Yankees’ dramatic and traumatic loss, there was some solace in knowing that the Captain had seized the moment and delivered big on the postseason stage. While his legacy as a great Yankee was already fortified, those two games dispelled any questions about his October mettle.

While we’re still months from October, the two games today at Yankee Stadium may be critical to dispel rumblings about his viability as Dodgers manager. A dismal performance on the biggest stage in baseball could be the final straw. Two wins could be a turning point in the season. If the past is any predictor, Mattingly will do everything he can to make sure his guys leave it all out on the field.

While you can see all options for Yankees Tickets from our partners at TiqIQ, they also did some advanced scouting to identify the best deal from the Yankees. Section 135 and 136: $86 with fees. $18 below anything else on the market – CLICK HERE.

Yankees return home for six-game homestand, Curtis Granderson expected back in lineup

Yankees-Tickets-May

By Dan Groob, TiqIQ

After rattling off five consecutive wins on the road, the New York Yankees find themselves in familiar territory — first place in the AL East. The Yankees return to New York for a six-game homestand at Yankee Stadium to take them through the weekend. The Yankees will open the homestand with a three-game set against the Seattle Mariners, the third lowest scoring team in all of baseball. Runs will likely be scarce in Tuesday’s series opener, as Yankees ace CC Sabathia takes the hill against Felix Hernandez.

Aiding the cause for the Yankees will be the likely return of outfielder Curtis Granderson, who has been on the disabled list all season long due to a broken forearm suffered when he was hit by a pitch in Spring Training. Granderson will add some pop to a Yankees lineup that led all of Major League Baseball in home runs last year by a whopping 31 taters, but has slipped to fifth in his absence this season.

Despite the series opening pitching matchup of aces and the presumed return of Granderson to the Yankees lineup, ticket prices for the Mariners series are among the lowest priced tickets at Yankee Stadium this season. According to TiqIQ, the Yankees tickets for this series carries an average price of $84, 27% below the season home average of $115.

All three games of the Mariners series check in at average prices between $82 and $86, with Wednesday evening’s contest being the highest priced, and Thursday’s the lowest. Tickets to get in the Stadium on Tuesday or Wednesday are available for as little as $3, while Thursday carries a get-in price of just $4.

  • Home Avg: $115
  • 5/14 vs Mariners: $85/$3
  • 5/15 vs Mariners: $82/$3
  • 5/16 vs Mariners: $86/$4
  • Series Avg: $84 (27% below season avg)

Following the three game set against the Mariners, the Toronto Blue Jays come to town for a three-game set of their own. The Blue Jays also visited Yankee Stadium for a four-game series back in April, which the Yankees swept. With the Blue Jays struggling a bit in the early going, and playing well-below expectations, all three games of these series also check in with average ticket prices below the Yankees home season average.

Friday night is the least expensive ticket of the bunch, averaging just $83 with a get-in price of $13. Saturday and Sunday are both 1:05pmET matinees, and carry slightly higher average ticket prices of $107 and $111, with get-in prices of $17 and $16, respectively. The series as a whole checks in with an average ticket price of $98 dollars, 15% below the Yankees home season average.

  • 5/17 vs Blue Jays: $83/$13
  • 5/18 vs Blue Jays: $107/$17
  • 5/19 vs Blue Jays: $111/$16
  • Series Avg: $98 (15% below season avg)

Following the six-game homestand, the Yankees will hit the road for eight games before returning home to close out May against the New York Mets and Boston Red Sox.

As is to be expected against these two teams, the next homestand will carry a ticket price premium to the season average. The Mets set checks in at an average ticket price of $130, a 13% premium to the season average, while the Red Sox series holds an average ticket price of $141, a 23% premium to the season average. It’s a good bet to check out and buy Yankees tickets from the official Yankees Ticket Exchange for the homestand.

  • 5/29 vs Mets: $132/$31
  • 5/30 vs Mets $129/$30
  • Series Avg: $130 (13% above season avg)
  • 5/31 vs Red Sox: $143/$33
  • 6/1 vs Red Sox: $140/$30
  • 62 vs Red Sox: $139/$29
  • Series Avg: $141 (23% above season avg)

Astros return to Bronx for just second time since record no-hitter, cheapest tickets of season available

Yankees-Astros

By Dan Groob, TiqIQ

Given the Yankees’ large market and devoted fan base, it is always expensive to procure New York Yankees tickets. Although this season seemed to begin a bit unenthusiastically, the Yankees fast start still has them right among the league leaders in average attendance and as April comes to a close, the New York Yankees appear to have silenced their critics by surging to the third best record in all of baseball. Despite playing the first month of the season without arguably their three best power hitters in Curtis Granderson, Mark Teixeira, and Alex Rodriguez, the Yankees have done significant damage with the long ball. Paced by Robinson Cano (7), Vernon Wells (6), and Travis Hafner (6), the Bronx Bombers’ have smacked 33 home runs so far, good for first in the American League.

Coming off a four game sweep of the Toronto Blue Jays, the preseason favorites to capture the AL East crown, the Yankees look to keep things rolling through a three game set with the Houston Astros. With the worst record in baseball at 7-18, the Astros essentially represent a polar opposite team from the Yankees. Much has been made of the Yankees possessing four players—Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, CC Sabathia, and Vernon Wells—who will make more than the entire Astros 25-man roster this season. Additionally, the Yankees are Major League Baseball’s oldest team, with an average age of 30.9, while the Astros are the youngest at 27.2. Those Astros come to town this week, with their lack of star power, are one of the lesser road draws this season. That creates an opportunity for cheaper tickets in major markets such as New York, even as the team heats up into the summer months.

According to TiqIQ, the three game set with the Astros that kicks off tonight is the least expensive series of the season at Yankee Stadium. Games 1 and 2 of the series are the two cheapest individual games of the season. While the Yankees carry an average home ticket price of $110 dollars, the average ticket price for tonight’s game checks in at just $40 dollars—a 64% discount to the season average.

Yankees home avg: $110

  • Game 1: $40/$4
  • Game 2: $43/$5
  • Game 3: $56/$5
  • Series Avg: $46

Game 2 of the series doesn’t command much of a premium to game 1, pricing at an average of just $43 dollars. Prices receive a slight bump for Wednesday night’s game, the first game of May, but only to $56 dollars—still roughly half the season average. With tickets available for as little as $4 or $5 dollars depending on the night, this Houston series represents a tremendous opportunity for fans to catch some action at Yankee Stadium on the cheap.

Yankees continue to struggle to sell high-priced seats for all but the top matchups

Yankees Tickets

A guest post from Dan Groob at TiqIQ.

It’s no secret the New York Yankees have struggled to fill the new Yankee Stadium since it opened its doors for the 2009 season. What many folks on the couch don’t realize however is that the Yankees haven’t had a problem selling tickets in the slightest — they’ve just had a really big problem selling the extremely high-priced seats you see while watching a game on television.

Many of the empty seats behind home plate at Yankee Stadium carry face values of over $2,000 dollars. Generally speaking, such seats tend to belong to season ticket holders who typically do not attend every game.  However, in the post-2008 economy, it has been near impossible for anyone to resell these tickets on the secondary market at anything close to what was paid for them. As a result, fans have begun to give up their season tickets to those seats while nobody has stepped in to replace them. Thus they remain vacant.

Though the Yankees have always sold out the rest of the stadium, the higher-priced ticket sales are largely responsible for driving the team’s average ticket price figure. This is particularly true on the secondary market. Because more fans have given up these seats every year, fewer have hit the secondary market, while fewer still have sold. As a result, the Yankees average ticket price has declined steadily in each of the past three years. According to TiqIQ, the average seat at Yankee Stadium in 2010 came in at $85 dollars on the secondary market. In 2011, this declined to $81 dollars. Last year, you could find a ticket on the secondary market at an average price of just $75 dollars.

Currently, New York Yankees tickets in the Bronx for the 2013 season run about $114 dollars on average. While this figure seems promising on the surface and indicative of a rebound in demand for Yankees tickets, the underlying details actually seem to suggest a further decline in Yankees ticket prices. Typically, the market exhibits some downward pressure on ticket prices between the beginning of Spring Training and the start of the season. At this time last year, the average ticket ran about $135 dollars — an 18% premium to where they are now — before settling at the average of $75 dollars once the season began.

Of course these are still the Yankees, and certain games will carry elevated demand for any and all seats. Most notably, three of the top five highest-priced series of the season include a common opponent — the Boston Red Sox. Although this could be one of those rare seasons when the AL East does not come down to New York and Boston in the final month, the September 5-8 series against the Sox is the most expensive of the season, with an average ticket price of $171 dollars and a get-in price of $39. The Red Sox are also responsible for the season’s second highest priced series on May 31-June 2, also at an average of $171.

The third most expensive series of the season will be the Subway Series against the New York Mets on May 29-30. These tickets are going for an average of $157 dollars, and $41 bucks just to get in the stadium. Following the Mets, the fourth most expensive series will be another interleague matchup, this one against the defending World Series Champion San Francisco Giants. This September 20-22 series against a Giants team, which formerly resided a subway ride away from Yankee Stadium, holds an average ticket price of $149, with a get-in price of $29 dollars.

Rounding out the top five most expensive series of the 2013 season will be the opening series against the Boston Red Sox on April 1-4. While this series checks in at an average price of $144 dollars, it actually contains the single highest-priced individual game of the season. This is of course the Opening Day afternoon game, which currently prices at a whopping $279 dollars serving well to exemplify how high a game average can go at Yankee Stadium when the home plate seats are selling.

Just missing the cut for the top five most expensive Yankees series? A two-game interleague series against the Los Angeles Dodgers on June 18 and 19. These two teams have met in the World Series a ridiculous eleven times, more than any two teams in baseball history.

However, this certainly isn’t your grandfather’s skip school to snag an Ebbets Field bleacher seat for a nickel game — a ticket to this series will put a little dent into grandpa’s pension at an average cost of $142 dollars. If your grandpa is an old Dodgers fan, do right by the man and take him to the ballgame. Just don’t tell him how much the tickets cost if you don’t feel like getting an earful on inflation and the good old days.

Remember, for the best deals on MLB tickets throughout the season, visit TiqIQ.com. TiqIQ has also teamed up with SeatCrunch to bring you additional options for New York Yankees Tickets.

An Ode to Raul

The night was getting late,
The base paths hardly trod,
Girardi pondered fate
And pinch hit for poor Arod.

The 40-year old bald guy
Sauntered to the plate
And with a timely mighty swing
Sent Arod down the grate.

Oh, Arod tried to smile
But he knew that he had died
A washed up veteran showed him
How to give the ball a ride.

Old Raul brought joy to thousands
Who were mired in a pout
His stellar blast consigned thirteen
To his new home–the dugout.

(via Wayne Kabak, Ben’s father)

Guest Post: The Legend of Pascual Perez, Ghost-Pitcher

Perez’s 1990 Topps card

The following is a guest post by my dear friend David Meadvin, with some assistance from me on the statistical/research front. Dave previously contributed to TYA as an occasional guest poster, and is probably the world’s biggest Pascual Perez fan. We’re talking about someone who, as a nine-year-old, literally filled three nine-card binder sheets up with nothing but the same exact 1990 Topps Pascual Perez card seen at the right (that’s twenty-seven (!) identical cards) for reasons that remain unclear to this day.

On a warm Dominican spring morning in 1957, Pascual Gross Perez came into this world – and Major League Baseball would never be the same.

I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m not an advanced stats kind of guy. I’ve never been that interested about baseball on paper; I love the game because it’s unpredictable in a way that stats can never fully capture. When Larry and I were growing up dodging beer bottles at Yankee Stadium and trading Topps cards, I was never a huge fan of the big stars. Sure, I loved Don Mattingly and Darryl Strawberry (I know he was a Met, but good God what a swing) – but my heart was always with the oddballs. And there have been few odder balls in MLB history that Pascual “I-285” Perez.

One of the many strange things about Perez is that his Minor League performance was mediocre at best. Signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent out of the Dominican Republic in 1976, Perez spent five years in Pittsburgh’s minor league system putting stats that hardly screamed “I’m ready for The Show.” In 1979, at AAA, he threw 103 innings of 5.50 ERA ball with an ugly 4.5 K/9 and 4.1 BB/9. He improved considerably the following season at AAA, throwing 160 innings of 4.05 ERA ball with a 5.9 K.9 and 2.7 BB/9, and he made his MLB debut on May 7, firing six innings of three-run ball, then getting sent right back down for his troubles. At the age of 24, Perez started the 1981 season at AAA for the third consecutive year. Today, it’s hard to imagine a pitcher with his minor league stat line ever seeing the bigs, but with a staff that was fronted by John Candelaria, a struggling Rick Rhoden, an ancient Luis Tiant and no one else anyone’s ever heard of, the Pirates were clearly desperate for pitching.

As a result, despite a 4.94 ERA and a worse walk rate (4.1 per nine) than strikeout rate (a paltry 3.2), Perez earned a Mid-May call-up. At the Major League-level, Perez actually pitched slightly better than his MiLB number might have indicated, but still, he was hardly a star. He tossed 86.1 innings of 3.96 ERA/3.57 FIP ball — numbers that few would frown upon from a middle-of-the-rotation starter these days, but back in 1981 were 10% and 1% worse than league average, respectively. Not to mention the fact that Perez still wasn’t striking anyone out, with a 4.8 K/9. Unimpressed, the Pirates demoted Perez back to AAA for the start of the 1982 season, which prompted the Dominican to consider leaving Major League Baseball and returning to the Caribbean League. Fortunately for all of us, the Atlanta Braves decided to take a chance on him and acquired him in a trade for Larry McWilliams, who had pitched to a putrid 6.21 ERA/1.91 WHIP the season before, but somehow managed to put up two solid years for the Pirates in 1983 and 1984.

The Braves may not have known exactly what they were getting in the rail-thin Perez, but it didn’t take long to find out. On August 19, 1982, Perez was scheduled to make his debut start in Atlanta. As game time approached, Perez was nowhere to be found. When Perez finally showed up – well after the game began – he explained that he drove around I-285 three times looking for the ballpark before finally running out of gas. Here’s how the story was reported in Sports Illustrated:

“When I get lost, I been in Atlanta for four days,” says Perez. “I rent a car and get my driving permit that morning, and I leave for the stadium very early, but I forget where to make a turn right.”

Thus handicapped, Perez made an afternoon-long ordeal out of what is normally a 15-minute ride. Circling helplessly, he finally pulled off the freeway at about 7:10 p.m., well north of Atlanta and running on fumes, and using gestures and his minimal English, persuaded a gas-station attendant to pump $10 worth of free gas for him. “I forgot my wallet, too,” says Perez.

The incident earned Perez the nickname “I-285,” which he proudly wore on the back of his warmup jacket. As Yankees fans are well aware, the Braves’ manager at the time, Joe Torre, is not known for treating rookies kindly – much less rookies who miss their first start. In fact, a famed poster commemorating the incident is described as including a mural of Torre, looking baffled, staring at his wristwatch. If anyone owns this poster or can unearth even a JPEG of it, please let us know [UPDATE: We finally secured a copy of this poster during the summer of 2012].

Surprisingly, Torre stuck with the enigmatic righthander. Incomprehensibly, Perez’s mishap lit a fire under the Braves. Heading into his Braves debut, the team was mired in a 2-19 slump. Yet, according to Sports Illustrated, the team “found the mishap so hilarious that they laughed their way into a 13-2 winning streak and then went on to win the National League West, thereby making Perez’s ride more familiar to Atlanta schoolchildren than Paul Revere’s.” The title run was also helped by Perez’ 79.1 innings of 82 ERA-/89 FIP ball for the Braves that season despite a K/9 of just 3.3(!).

Perez also began establishing a reputation around Major League Baseball that season for on-field antics that included shooting batters with an imaginary finger-gun, peering through his legs to see what kinds of leads baserunners were taking, regular beanings and threats, an occasional eephus pitch (which would come to be known as the “Pascual Pitch” in certain circles), and of course his gleaming curly locks. As one opposing manager proclaimed, “there’s not enough mustard in the State of Georgia for Mr. Perez.” Perez’s response? “Everybody mad at me because they think I try to hit somebody, but I don’t try to hit nobody. The coaches tell me, ‘Don’t be afraid sometimes to pitch inside,’ so I do it.”

Coming into the 1983 season, the Braves saw Perez as an emerging star, and he lived up to their expectations, posting the best season of his career. He threw 215.1 innings of 3.43 ERA (90 ERA-)/3.39 FIP (87 FIP-) ball, with a 6.0 K/9 and 2.1 BB/9, worth 4.1 fWAR. Sadly, Perez found himself jailed in the Dominican Republic in the offseason on drug charges. After his release, he returned to the Braves in May 1984 and proceeded to win 14 games the remainder of the season. It’s not out of the realm of possibility that if not for his jail time, Perez would have been a 20 game winner in the ’84 season.

In 1985, everything fell apart. Perez served three stints on the disabled list with shoulder pain before earning a team suspension in July for disappearing somewhere between New York and Montreal. After finishing the year with a heinous 1-13 record, Perez, who just a year earlier was seen as an emerging ace and probably would have been unanimously elected mayor of Atlanta, was released by the Braves.

1986 is a complete mystery. There is no record of Perez throwing a single pitch in any organized baseball league, or even what he did with his time.

Fortunately, the Pascual Perez story was not over. Prior to the 1987 season, the Montreal Expos managed to track him down and signed him to a minor league contract. Visa problems kept him from entering the United States until May, but after several months of minor league ball, Perez made his return on August 22, 1987, throwing five innings of three-run ball against the Giants. He finished the year a perfect 7-0. This time, Perez appeared to have finally figured it out with Montreal, enjoying the finest three-year stretch of his career as he threw 456.2 innings of 2.80 ERA (80 ERA-)/3.05 FIP (85 FIP-) ball, upping his K/9 6.7 and walking almost no one, with a 2.1 BB/9. In 1988, he pitched a rain-shortened, five inning no-hitter.

After an uninspired 1989 season, the Yankees came calling. Coming off two straight fifth-place seasons and utterly desperate for starting pitching (their starters pitched to an MLB-worst 121 ERA- from 1988-1989), the Yankees decided to invest 3 years and $5.7 million in Perez.

The big-bucks investment didn’t exactly pay off. Prior to throwing a single pitch for the Yankees he arrived seven days late to spring training with what the Yankees described as yet more “visa problems,” prompting then-Expos manager Buck Rodgers to describe Perez as “a time bomb that the Yankees will have to monitor closely.” In his third start that season, Perez departed with an ailing arm that required rotator-cuff surgery that August.  He also could have invested in a datebook or personal assistant, as Pascual showed up 10 days late to spring training in 1991, and five days late in 1992.

The thing is, when Perez actually took the mound he was effective, putting up a 2.87 ERA and 3.60 FIP in 1990 and 1991. But he only pitched a total of 87.2 innings spread out over two seasons. For whatever reason, he just couldn’t stay healthy (or present) for long stretches during his time in pinstripes. It all came crashing down in 1992 — the third and final year of Perez’s big contract – when he was suspended by MLB violating the league’s drug policy. This forced him to forfeit the remaining $1.9 million left on his contract.

Despite these myriad setbacks, the Yankees were actually interested in retaining Perez’s services. The New York Times reported that general manager Gene Michael placed about 60 calls to him over the offseason, but never heard back. Perez, who once referred to himself as “one of five twin brothers,” (one of those five, Melido, of course also pitched for the Yankees, and gave the Bombers quite a bit more than Pascual ever did, posting a 4.06 ERA/3.84 FIP over 631.1 innings from 1992-1995) had fallen deep into the Dominican Republic, far from the grasp of Major League Baseball.

Despite the Yankees’ best efforts, to this day, Pascual Perez has never been found. He may be gone, but his legacy lives on in the hearts of fans everywhere who consider him a hall-of-famer in baseball’s theater of the absurd.

Guest Post: Mason Williams Scouting Report

The following a guest post from David Gershman, better know as The Gersh around the Twitterverse. He spent last summer covering the NY-Penn League, and today gives us a firsthand scouting report on Mason Williams, the Yankees top position player prospect now that Jesus Montero is headed to Seattle. You can follow Gersh on Twitter at @Dave_Gershman.

(Photo via MiLB.com)

Of all the talent I was able to spectate in 2011, hardly anyone caught my eye to the extent of Mason Williams, Staten Island’s everyday center-fielder. The New York-Penn League technically ranks as the third lowest developmental level in baseball, ahead of the Pioneer and Appy Leagues and the Gulf Coast League. Therefore, finding talent to keep an eye on is somewhat rare. As a matter of fact, on a good year there might only be one elite-level talent worth watching in the Penn League. While I’m not claiming Williams to be an elite-level prospect, his upside and advanced skill-set are through the roof, clearly making him a must-see talent.

A scout once requested my opinion on Williams and my reasoning for touting him as much as I did last season. I replied, “After months of Extended Spring Training work, Williams began to hit the cover off of the ball right out of the gate and continued doing so even after the first week of the season. There wasn’t any point throughout the year in which he cooled off, and it was rather astonishing.” I labeled his everlasting performance as astonishing simply because inconsistency is so common amongst prospects at the short-season level. And it’s especially colloquial for those playing their first season as a professional. On to the report.

Williams is a terrific athlete with assets and upside that could make him an above-average major leaguer in the not-too-distant future. Quick hands, loads of bat speed and a smooth bat plain make him an advanced hitter, one that hits both lefties and righties without much problem for someone of his age and level. Williams is prone to making bad contact at times, given his high tendency to swing early in the count and, more importantly, at lousy pitches, but plate discipline is an aspect of his game I imagine he’ll be working to ameliorate until he reaches the majors.

While his approach needs some tuning, he has the right idea. As one professional scout noted, “a hitter constantly swinging at pitches early in the count would generally warrant some concern, but if the hitter is either making good contact with pitches in the zone or swinging at hittable pitches than there isn’t much of a problem, and Mason Williams often overdoes it, he customarily accounts for both.”

Williams has a thin and wiry frame, but contains tons of physicality and, in correspondence, some of the most physical upside the Yankees system. He isn’t expected to possess too much power down the road, but certainly enough to avoid being considered a “slap-hitter” of any sort. Remaining a center fielder isn’t a question, but the role system (at least according to two scouts), suggests that Angelo Gumbs might be a more adequate center-field option than Williams should both progress at a similar rate. Williams’ plus range and baseball instincts, at least for me, make him a more-than-viable candidate to be an every day center-fielder for the Yanks down the road.  Williams seemed to have developed refined accuracy as last season progressed. Accuracy sure is expected to develop accordingly, but arm strength is slightly different. As players fill out and develop more fortitude and muscle, they improve the distance and accuracy on their throws. Being that his arm is currently below average unquestionably is a non-issue.

Williams’ current and future tool grades are to the right and up a bit. If you need an explanation as to how these grades work, you can read my primer on how professional scouting reports are compiled.

The reason I gave Williams such a low power projection is mostly due to lack of leverage and loft in his swing. Although it’s quick and stays through the zone, it’s choppy and rather flat. That doesn’t make him a bad hitter by any means; it just decreases his power projection. That said, he’s shown the ability to hit to all fields and, in doing so, drive the ball. Additionally, I upgraded his overall future potential (OFP) because his range and speed suggest such an adjustment.

All professional scouts have a specific computer program that automatically adjusts OFP based on the weight of the prospect and his positional grade requirements. Meaning, center fielders are supposed to have plus range and speed, even if they aren’t that good of hitters. However, what if a first-baseman grades out to have 30 power but 70 speed and defense? His adjusted OFP would lower significantly since first base is a power position. Thus, center field is a speed and defense position.

The Yankees have a rare commodity in Williams, a clear center-fielder with the ability to hit. He’s only 20-years of age, so the Yankees obviously won’t be rushing him at any point. That said, if he shows he can hit in Charleston I’d expect him to finish the season off in Tampa and eventually head to Trenton sometime in 2013. Unlike his time spent in Staten Island, Williams won’t be hitting .349 in Charleston this season, but you can unequivocally expect a to see improvements and maturity in Mason Williams’ game. He’s a bright player with a bright future.