Yankees to activate Jacoby Ellsbury off DL on Wednesday

(Dilip Vishwanat/Getty)
(Dilip Vishwanat/Getty)

The Yankees will activate Jacoby Ellsbury off the 15-day DL on Wednesday, Brian Cashman confirmed to George King. Ellsbury has been out since May 19th due to a right knee injury. I’m guessing Gregorio Petit will be sent to Triple-A to clear a roster spot.

Ellsbury was scheduled to play in a minor league rehab with High-A Tampa today, but Cashman said he’s been scratched because it rained and the field is soaked. Ellsbury played in a simulated game instead and will do the same Tuesday before rejoining the team. He’s 2-for-13 (.154) in four official rehab games so far.

Even after Ellsbury returns, the Yankees will still have Carlos Beltran (oblique), Slade Heathcott (quad), and Mason Williams (shoulder) on the DL. Ramon Flores figures to stick around until Beltran returns, but we’ll see. Either way, it’ll be nice to see the Ellsbury/Brett Gardner duo raise hell atop the lineup again.

Update: Carlos Beltran exits game with ribcage injury

12:52am: Beltran left the game with a ribcage injury, Joe Girardi told reporters after the game. He’ll be re-evaluated tomorrow and there’s a chance he’ll have to be placed on the DL.

11:35pm: Carlos Beltran exited tonight’s game with some kind of injury. He hurt himself during an at-bat in the fifth inning — Joe Girardi and trainer Steve Donohue came out to check on him — but stayed in to finish the at-bat before being removed between innings. It appeared Beltran pointed to his oblique, but I could be wrong.

Beltran, 38, came into Tuesday’s game hitting .263/.312/.433 (103 wRC+) overall, though he’s been much better of late, with a .302/.349/.500 (135 wRC+) batting line since May 1st. The Yankees are already without Jacoby Ellsbury (knee), Slade Heathcott (quad), and Mason Williams (shoulder), so they really can’t afford to lose another outfielder. Ramon Flores is the obvious call-up candidate if Beltran misses time.

The Yankees haven’t announced anything about Beltran’s injury yet, so stayed tuned for updates.

Injury Updates: Ellsbury, Miller, Clarkin, DeCarr, Jagielo


The Yankees begin their three-game series with the Angels later tonight (much later tonight), so, until then, here are some updates on a few injured Yankees via Meredith Marakovits, Marly Rivera, Joel Sherman, and the Yankees themselves.

  • Jacoby Ellsbury (knee) traveled to Tampa following yesterday’s game and will begin playing in minor league rehab games at some point later this week. “I’m excited to get back. (I’ll be) playing in games sometime this week and I can’t wait to get back to big league club,” he said.
  • UPDATE: Ellsbury will start a rehab assignment with High-A Tampa today, the team just announced. My guess is the Yankees hope to have him back in the lineup for the start of the homestand on Friday. Fingers crossed.
  • Andrew Miller (forearm) is scheduled to throw a bullpen session on Wednesday. He played catch the last few days and will do it again today. Miller will long-toss tomorrow before getting up on a mound Wednesday. Can’t imagine he’ll need much time to get ready after that as a short reliever.
  • Ian Clarkin (elbow) has not had Tommy John surgery. Not yet, anyway. Clarkin was shut down in Spring Training with elbow tendinitis and he reportedly pitched in an Extended Spring Training game in May, but we haven’t heard anything since. This non-update is the latest.
  • Austin DeCarr (elbow) did have Tommy John surgery, however. Not sure when when he had it — last week? last month? March? makes a difference! — but he had it. DeCarr was the team’s third round pick last year and I had him as their 16th best prospect coming in the season.
  • This isn’t really an injury, but I’m not sure where else to put it: Eric Jagielo was diagnosed with diabetes late last year. It’s manageable and hasn’t impacted his career in any way to this point. But still, geez. This has been a bad year for minor league injuries and this adds the lolwtf factor.

Jacob Lindgren to have surgery to remove bone spur from elbow


Rookie left-hander Jacob Lindgren will have surgery on Monday to remove a bone spur from his elbow, the Yankees announced. Team doctor Dr. Ahmad will perform the procedure and the Yankees say the rehab timetable is “expected to be no more than 12 weeks.”

Lindgren, 22, allowed four runs in seven innings with the Yankees after pitching to a 1.23 ERA (1.93 FIP) in 22 innings with Triple-A Scranton. He allowed three homers in his seven innings with New York and left a lot of pitches up, which could have had something to do with the elbow problem. Maybe, maybe not. Who knows.

I’m not sure how the timing of all this works. I was under the impression the Yankees would have had to call Lindgren back up and place him on the big league DL if he suffered the injury in MLB, allowing him to accrue service time and get big league salary. He was optioned down a few days ago and placed on the Triple-A DL though, and it sounds like that’s where he’s staying. Like I said, I’m not sure how this works.

The 12-week timetable comes close to ending Lindgren’s season — it puts him on target to return in the middle of September. I think the injury makes Lindgren a prime candidate for the Arizona Fall League, which would allow him to make up for some lost innings.

Saturday Links: Miller, Bailey, Hall of Fame, Security

(Patrick Smith/Getty)
(Patrick Smith/Getty)

The Yankees and Tigers continue their series later today, after the 69th annual Old Timers’ Day. All the fun starts at 4pm ET. Here are some stray links to keep you busy until then.

Miller Still Shut Down

Ten days ago the Yankees placed Andrew Miller on the 15-day DL with a forearm muscle strain, and, as of Thursday, the left-hander still has not resumed throwing according to Dan Martin. “I’m still resting,” said Miller. The Yankees said Miller would be shut down 10-14 days after being placed on the DL and he’s still within the window, obviously. Miller’s not behind schedule or anything. He’s right on schedule, I guess. Hopefully he can resume throwing sometime in the next few days and get back to the team before the All-Star break. The bullpen without Miller has a totally different dynamic.

Bailey returns to the mound

Remember Andrew Bailey? The magic of Spring Training had us all thinking Bailey could actually help the Yankees this season, but instead he suffered a setback a few weeks into the season as he worked his way back from shoulder capsule surgery. Bailey was shut down in April with a shoulder strain and was scheduled to start a throwing program in May, though I guess that was delayed.

Earlier this week, Brian Cashman told Brendan Kuty that Bailey has indeed returned to the mound, throwing an inning in an Extended Spring Training game on Wednesday. I’m not sure what the plan is now — ExST is over (or will be very soon) now that the short season leagues are starting — but it sounds like Bailey is on the mend. The Yankees are going to want to see him pitch in minor league games, including back-to-back days before bringing him up. If Bailey can help at some point, great, the Yankees can use another reliever, but obviously the odds are quite long right now.

A-Rod‘s bat going to the Hall of Fame

(Al Bello/Getty)
(Al Bello/Getty)

There’s no word on what will happen with his 3,000th hit bat, but Alex Rodriguez has already donated his 2,000th RBI bat to the Hall of Fame, writes Ryan Hatch. “We extend our gratitude to Alex for donating the bat he used to record his 2,000th RBI to the Museum,” said Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson. The bat will be displayed as part of the “Today’s Game” exhibit at the museum. A-Rod has some other stuff in the Hall of Fame, including the helmet from his 500th homer and his spikes from Game Six of the 2009 World Series.

Alex became the second player in history with 2,000 RBI officially, joining Hank Aaron (2,297). It’s a weird situation though. RBI did not become an official stat until 1920, and MLB ignores everything that happened before then. Baseball Reference has retroactively calculated RBI totals and both Babe Ruth (2,214) and Cap Anson (2,075) have 2,000+ RBI, but MLB does not recognized their pre-1920 totals. It’s like they don’t exist. It’s so silly. Either way, A-Rod is in the 2,000 RBI club. Whether he’s the second member or the fourth member is immaterial. It’s an extremely exclusive club.

Yankees beef up security after Astros hack

Earlier this week word got out the FBI and Justice Department are investigating the Cardinals for hacking into the Astros’ proprietary database, which is a crime. Like an actual crime with legal implications. Last June some trade information was leaked from Houston’s system, at which point the Yankees beefed up their security system. Here’s what Brian Cashman told Christian De Nicola:

“We certainly added some more measures, spent more money to protect what’s privileged,” Cashman said. “It’s more inconvenient now for us to access our stuff, but we did it — again — to look for where those vulnerabilities were and made some adjustments and spent some more money to upgrade the process.”

“There were some extra steps. Were they necessary? We’ll never know, but we’re more secure by doing so. We felt secure before, but we made it more difficult now. It’s a little more inconvenience when we’re accessing our system ourselves, but we spent some more money to add some further measures, regardless. There were grumblings by employees at the front end of it, because to access our system it’s more difficult now for all of us to do so, but we’re better protected by the way we went about it.”

Every team has their own internal information system these days and, of course, all their scouting reports and statistical data are different. They all use stats differently and they all have different scouting reports, so the need to protect that information is obvious. I’m guessing the Yankees were not the only team to improve their security after the Astros’ leaks last year. Twenty-nine other clubs probably improved their security as well.

Update: Mason Williams exits game with jammed shoulder

9:40pm: Williams left the game with a jammed right shoulder, the Yankees announced. He was looked at by the team doctors and no tests are scheduled at this time. Sounds like good news to me.

8:52pm: Mason Williams left tonight’s game with an apparent right (throwing) shoulder injury in the fifth inning. He hurt himself diving back into first base on a pickoff throw. The trainers looked him over and Williams did stay in to run the bases, but he was removed from the game between innings. Hopefully it is just precautionary.

Williams, 23, went 1-for-2 before leaving the game and is 6-for-21 (.286) with two singles, three doubles, and one homer in eight games. The Yankees do have Ramon Flores waiting in Triple-A should Williams miss time, but they’re already without Jacoby Ellsbury and Slade Heathcott. Losing another outfielder would be no bueno.

The Yankees haven’t released an update on Williams yet, so stay tuned.

Update: Chase Headley leaves game with groin injury

10:42pm: Headley left the game because he felt nauseous after the shot the groin, Joe Girardi told reporters. Yup. He’s day-to-day.

8:47pm: Chase Headley left tonight’s game with an injury, apparently. Headley whiffed while attempting to field a ground ball in the third inning and the ball hit him right in the biscuits, though he did stay in to complete that inning plus one more after that. The Yankees haven’t provided any sort of update yet.

The Yankees do not have a backup third baseman, so losing Headley would be really bad, errors or no errors. Alex Rodriguez is the full-time DH now, which means either Brendan Ryan, Gregorio Petit, Jose Pirela, or mostly likely Stephen Drew would get the nod at third if Headley has to miss any time. Hopefully not.