Martino: Yankees avoid arbitration with Nathan Eovaldi and David Carpenter

Eovaldi. (Eliot J. Schechter/Getty)
Eovaldi. (Eliot J. Schechter/Getty)

Saturday, 4:33pm: The Yankees have also announced the Eovaldi deal, so that’s done too.

Friday, 7:08pm: The Yankees have announced Carpenter’s one-year, non-guaranteed contract. (Non-guaranteed contracts are standard for players in their pre-arbitration and arbitration years.) The team didn’t announce the Eovaldi deal, however. Could still be dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s.

6:47pm: Carpenter will actually make $1.275M this coming season, according to Bryan Hoch. Not a huge difference, but you know, accuracy and stuff.

6:22pm: The Yankees have avoided arbitration with both Nathan Eovaldi and David Carpenter, reports Andy Martino. Eovaldi gets $3.3M and Carpenter gets $1.3M, both on one-year contracts for 2015. MLBTR projected them to receive $3.1M and $1.1M, respectively.

Eovaldi, 24, came to New York in a five-player trade with the Marlins a few weeks ago. He was arbitration-eligible for the first time and will not qualify for free agency until after the 2017 season. Eovaldi took a career 4.07 ERA (3.70 FIP) in 460 innings into his first year of arbitration eligibility.

The 29-year-old Carpenter came over from the Braves in the Manny Banuelos trade last month. Like Eovaldi, he was arbitration-eligible for the first time this winter and won’t become a free agent until after 2017. Carpenter has a 3.62 ERA (3.42 FIP) in 186.2 career innings as a middle reliever.

With Eovaldi and Carpenter now locked up, the Yankees have signed all of their arbitration-eligible players. The team had previously agreed to deals with Ivan Nova ($3.3M), Michael Pineda ($2.1M), and Esmil Rogers ($1.48M). Today was the deadline for the two sides to exchange salary figures, but it didn’t get that far. The Yankees have a history of signing their players before filing figures.

Yankees, Michael Pineda avoid arbitration with one-year, $2.1M deal

(Mike Stobe/Getty)
(Mike Stobe/Getty)

7:06pm: The Yankees have announced the one-year contract. It’s non-guaranteed, which is standard for pre-arbitration and arbitration-eligible players.

4:44pm: According to Chad Jennings, the Yankees and Michael Pineda have agreed to a one-year contract worth $2.1M, avoiding arbitration. That exactly matched MLBTR’s projection. Nathan Eovaldi (projected $3.1M) and David Carpenter ($1.1M) are the team’s only unsigned arbitration-eligible players.

Pineda, 25, has only made 13 starts during his three years with the Yankees, all last season, but he accrued a bunch of service time while on the disabled list from 2012-13. This was Pineda’s first arbitration year. He isn’t scheduled to qualify for free agency until after the 2017 season.

In those 13 starts last year, Pineda had a 1.89 ERA (2.71 FIP) in 76.1 innings. Shoulder trouble sidelined him for a big chunk of the season, but he was dominant when healthy. The Yankees and all their fans want to see more of that Big Mike going forward. He was awesome.

In addition to Pineda, the Yankees have already signed Ivan Nova ($3.3M) and Esmil Rogers ($1.48M) as well. Today is the deadline for teams and eligible players to exchange salary figures, but the Yankees have historically signed all of their guys before then. Eovaldi and Carpenter will likely get have deals in place today too.

Yankees officially sign Stephen Drew, designate Eury Perez for assignment

Oh Eury. (Jim Rogash/Getty)
Oh Eury. (Jim Rogash/Getty)

After ten days of waiting, the Yankees have officially signed Stephen Drew to a one-year contract, the team announced. He will reportedly earn $5M with $1.5M in incentives based on plate appearances. As expected, Eury Perez was designated for assignment to clear a 40-man roster spot.

Perez, 24, was claimed off waivers from the Nationals in September. He went 2-for-10 with a stolen base and three strikeouts for New York late last season and actually started two games in center field in the final series against the Red Sox, after the Yankees were eliminated from postseason and Jacoby Ellsbury was nursing an ankle injury.

At best, Perez was fourth on the center field depth chart behind Ellsbury, Brett Gardner, and Chris Young. He’s a classic speed and defense type who figured to serve as the up-and-down extra outfielder in 2015. Ramon Flores or even Jose Pirela is in line to be that guy now.

Yankees sign Ivan Nova to one-year, $3.3M contract, avoiding arbitration

(Rich Schultz/Getty)
(Rich Schultz/Getty)

The Yankees have signed Ivan Nova to a non-guaranteed one-year contract, avoiding arbitration, the team announced. Non-guaranteed contracts are standard for arbitration-eligible players. Joel Sherman hears Nova will earn $3.3M this coming the season, the same as last year. MLBTR projected a $3.3M salary as well.

Nova, who turned 28 on Monday, didn’t receive a raise this offseason because he only made four starts last year before undergoing Tommy John surgery. Those four starts were really bad too — he had a 8.27 ERA (6.91 FIP) with 40 base-runners allowed in 20.2 innings. Nova had his elbow rebuilt in late-April and isn’t expected to return until May or June of this coming season.

Friday is the deadline for teams and players to submit salary figures for arbitration, but the Yankees rarely let it get that far. They tend to sign their players before figures are exchanged. With Nova and Esmil Rogers both signed, the team’s only remaining arbitration-eligible players are Nathan Eovaldi (projected for $3.1M), Michael Pineda ($2.1M), and David Carpenter ($1.1M).

Yankees acquire reliever Chris Martin from Rockies

(Presswire)
(Presswire)

1:35pm: The Yankees have announced the trade. It’s Martin for cash considerations, as reported. Gonzalez German has been designated for assignment to clear a 40-man roster spot.

12:30pm: The Yankees have acquired right-handed reliever Chris Martin from the Rockies for cash, according to Jack Curry. Colorado designated Martin for assignment last week when they needed roster space after signing Nick Hundley. The Yankees have not announced the trade and will need to a clear a 40-man roster spot.

Martin, 28, made his MLB debut with the Rockies last season, allowing 12 runs on 22 hits and four walks (and two balks!) in 15.2 innings. He struck out 14. Martin spent most of the year in Triple-A, where he had a 4.39 ERA (3.21 FIP) in 26.2 innings with good strikeout (12.15 K/9 and 29.9 K%) and walk (3.04 BB/9 and 7.4 BB%) rates.

The Rockies originally acquired Martin from the Red Sox in the trade that sent Jonathan Herrera to Boston last winter. Boston signed him out of an independent league in 2011. Here’s a scouting report from Sox Prospects:

Throws from a 3/4 arm slot. Easy, balanced delivery with the ball loosely coming out of his hand. Fastball sits 93-95 mph. Creates sink by throwing downhill … Also features a solid-average 84-86 mph slider. At its best the pitch shows depth and bite, but he’s inconsistent with the offering and at times it rolls to the plate, allowing batters to get a piece of it. It generates swings and misses when its on. Also mixes in a below-average 83-84 mph changeup.

Martin is a tall drink of water — he’s listed at 6-foot-8 and 215 lbs. — so I guess it’s no surprise the Yankees pounced. They love their tall pitchers. Martin is just another bullpen depth arm who figures to head to Triple-A Scranton when the season begins. Small move designed to slightly upgrade literally the 40th spot on the 40-man roster.

Yankees sign Stephen Drew

(Alex Goodlett/Getty)
(Alex Goodlett/Getty)

Wednesday, 10:28am ET by Mike: Drew will receive $500,000 for his 450th, 500th, and 550th plate appearances, according to Buster Olney. So the only way Drew will come close to reaching the $1.5M in incentives is if he actually plays well enough to stay in the lineup regularly.

Tuesday, 9:41pm ET by Joe: The Yankees have signed Stephen Drew to a one-year, $5 million deal, reports Jon Heyman of CBS News. Incentives could increase the deal to $6 or $7 million.

It was but a few hours ago that Drew’s name last appeared on this site, citing a Heyman report that the Yankees were “peeking” at Drew as an option for second base. It now appears he’ll start there, barring a horrible Spring Training or injury.

It might appear signing Drew blocks Rob Refsnyder, but that’s simply not the case. If Refsnyder forces the issue, it will be hard for the Yankees to hold him back for the sake of Drew. The $5 million Drew earns accounts for about 2 percent of the payroll. He’s not a make-or-break player. He’s a guy who has performed well in the past — a 95 career OPS+ and 111 in 2013, both of which are pretty nice for a middle infielder this day in age — who gives the Yankees some depth.

If Refsnyder wows everyone in Spring Training, they’ll find a spot for him. It might not be on the Opening Day roster, but if he’s hitting (and improves his defense at 2B) they’re not just going to let him toil all season in AAA if he can outperform Drew or even Didi Gregorius.

Which brings up another point: Drew also provides some shortstop depth. If Gregorius flops, Drew can slide in. That opens a spot for Refsnyder. He could also cover Gregorius against left-handed pitching — he has a .668 career OPS against lefties, which is nothing great but at the same time much better than Gregorius.

Most importantly, if Drew is bad the Yankees will replace him. It might take a while, given how long it took them to cut ties with Alfonso Soriano and Brian Roberts last season. Hopefully they’ve learned from that and will take a more Randy Winn-like approach if Drew’s performance resembles that of Winn in 2010. The deal is for just one year, so it’s not as though he’s blocking Refsnyder for three or four seasons.

The 40-man roster is currently full, so the Yankees will have to make a move before making the Drew signing official. My bet is that they DFA Brendan Ryan and go with Jose Pirela as the utility guy.

Sherman: Yankees re-sign Slade Heathcott to minor league contract

(MiLB.com)
(MiLB.com)

According to Joel Sherman, the Yankees have re-signed Slade Heathcott to a minor league contract with an invitation to Spring Training. The team non-tendered Heathcott back in November, allowing him to come off the 40-man roster without passing through waivers. They did the same with Jose Campos, who also re-signed.

Heathcott, 24, played only nine games last season due to a pair of knee surgeries — his season started late following offseason surgery and ended early due to another procedure in June. The invitation to big league Spring Training is an indication Heathcott either is healthy now or expected to be ready to play by time camp opens.

In parts of six minor league seasons since being the 29th overall pick in the 2009 draft — the compensation pick the Yankees received for failing to sign Gerrit Cole in 2008 — Heathcott has hit .268/.346/.404 in only 309 career games. He’s had lots of shoulder and knee problems, including multiples surgery on each.

Assuming he’s healthy to start the regular season, Heathcott could head to Triple-A Scranton after playing 112 games with Double-A Trenton from 2013-14. A return to the Thunder is always possible, as is starting down in High-A Tampa to shake off the rust. We’ll have to see how the upper level outfields shake out. Lots of candidates.