Sanchez: D’Backs agree to six-year deal with Yasmany Tomas

The Diamondbacks have agree to a six-year deal worth $68.5M with free agent Cuban outfielder Yasmany Tomas, reports Jesse Sanchez. The contract reportedly includes an opt-out after the fourth year. The Yankees attended Tomas’ workouts but did not have serious interest in signing him. More to come … eventually.

Stark: Yankees called about Jimmy Rollins, moved on because price was too high

(Presswire)
(Presswire)

The Yankees called the Phillies to inquire about the availability of shortstop Jimmy Rollins, but they moved on because the price was so high, reports Jayson Stark. Phils GM Ruben Amaro confirmed Rollins was not asked to waive his no-trade clause and called him “one of best shortstops in baseball still” and “somebody we want on our club.”

Rollins, who turns 36 tomorrow, hit .243/.323/.394 (102 wRC+) with 17 homers and 28 steals in 34 attempts (82% success rate) this past season. His defense at short continues to rate as a bit above-average. Rollins is under contract for $11M next year and will become a free agent after the season, so he’s a pure rental. He’s expressed a willingness to waive his no-trade clause in the past, so that might not be much of an obstacle.

Amaro has reportedly annoyed his fellow GMs with high asking prices and an unwillingness to negotiate — he also blamed other teams for his inactivity at the trade deadline — so there’s no guarantee the asking price for Rollins will come down later in the winter. Rollins does make sense as a one-year shortstop stopgap though — he’s better than Stephen Drew and can contribute on both sides of the ball — but not at any price. Maybe Amaro will come to his senses in a few weeks.

Update: For what it’s worth, ZiPS projects a .248/.314/.386 (92 OPS+) batting line and 2.4 WAR for Rollins in 2015. That represents like a four-win upgrade over what the Yankees got from the shortstop position this past season. It was that bad.

Update II: Stark says the Yankees offered the Phillies a “utility player” for Rollins and it wasn’t nearly enough. So Brendan Ryan? Jose Pirela? Zelous Wheeler before he went to Japan? Intrigue!

Heyman: Yankees only willing to give Chase Headley three years

(Jim McIsaac/Getty)
(Jim McIsaac/Getty)

According to Jon Heyman, the Yankees are not willing to give third baseman Chase Headley anything longer than a three-year contract. Obviously this could all be posturing at this point. Heyman says the Giants have contacted Headley after losing Pablo Sandoval to the Red Sox earlier this week, and supposedly the Indians, Blue Jays, and Padres have shown some level of interest as well.

If the Yankees are truly only willing to go three years for Headley, then in all likelihood they’ll be playing Martin Prado at third base in 2015. Heyman says Headley rejected a three-year, $39M extension from San Diego back in the spring, so you know he’s aiming higher. Sandoval, who is a comparable player, just got five years with an option for a sixth. Headley’s probably going to get a bunch of three years offer and wind up signing with the first team to step forward and offer that fourth guaranteed year.

Playing Prado at third base is not bad in and of itself, but I see Headley at third and Prado at second as a way better plan than Prado at third and either Jose Pirela or Rob Refsnyder at second. The more Major League caliber players, the better. Whenever someone inevitably gets hurt, Prado can change positions to cover for the injury and then either Pirela or Refsnyder can take over at second. The Yankees can’t count on Alex Rodriguez to play third at all. At least not until he shows he can do it in camp.

The best third baseman scheduled to hit free agency next year is David Freese. The best the year after that will be 37-year-old Adrian Beltre. Headley is the best third basemen who will be available for nothing but money for the foreseeable future. If the Yankees aren’t comfortable with going more than three years for him, fine, but the only way they’ll get a better player in the next two or three years is by dipping into their farm system and making a trade.

Should the Yankees give Chase Headley more than three years?

Sherman: Yankees have made several trade offers for shortstops

(Leon Halip/Getty)
(Leon Halip/Getty)

According to Joel Sherman, the Yankees have “made a series of trade offers to teams for shortstops” this offseason. He doesn’t name names, but we can make some halfway educated guesses: Elvis Andrus, Alexei Ramirez, Jimmy Rollins, Didi Gregorius, and Troy Tulowitzki. Sound good? I’m sure the Yankees at least placed a phone call asking about those players (and others!) this winter, even if it was only out of due diligence.

The free agent shortstop market is pretty weak right now. Jed Lowrie and Asdrubal Cabrera are still available, though both are better suited for second base at this point. Stephen Drew is still out there and he’s an actual Major League caliber shortstop, but he absolutely stunk at the plate this past season. Hanley Ramirez, who is a shortstop in name only, is now off the board as well. After that there’s Clint Barmes. So yeah.

Anyway, I’m glad to hear the Yankees are pursuing trades for a shortstop because that’s the only way they’re going to add an impact player at the position. I’d love love love to see them nab a young shortstop who can man the position both in 2015 and for the next five years. That would be the dream scenario even if it costs half the farm system. If that doesn’t happen, stopgaps better than Drew might be available. Someone like Ramirez or Jimmy Rollins.

The Yankees need half an infield this winter and Sherman says the team seems to prioritizing a shortstop, which makes sense. They can play Martin Prado at second or third base and have others like Jose Pirela and Rob Refsnyder available for second if necessary. The fact that they’ve already made some trade offers is a good sign because it shows they’re being aggressive and not waiting for the market to develop. The sooner they get this sorted out, the better.

Murti: Yankees have discussed signing Jason Grilli

(Jim Rogash/Getty)
(Jim Rogash/Getty)

As they mull over potential bullpen options, the Yankees have discussed signing free agent right-hander Jason Grilli, reports Sweeny Murti. Murti makes it sound like the team was talking about Grilli as a potential replacement for David Robertson should their incumbent closer sign elsewhere this winter. Then again, it’s the bullpen. There are several spots to fill. Grilli’s agent is Gary Sheffield, by the way. (Yes, really.)

Grilli, 38, has a 4.00 ERA (3.37 FIP) in 54 innings split between the Pirates and Angels this past season. He had a 2.82 ERA (2.42 FIP) with Pittsburgh from 2012-13 and was their closer in 2013 before losing the job earlier this year. Grilli seemed to figure some things out while in Triple-A with the Phillies in 2011, and was able to carry his success over into MLB. Here’s a quick breakdown of his last three seasons:

IP ERA FIP K% BB% GB% HR/9 RHB wOBA LHP wOBA
2012 58.2 2.91 2.80 36.9% 9.0% 30.7% 1.07 0.328 0.217
2013 50.0 2.70 1.97 36.6% 6.4% 33.0% 0.72 0.220 0.316
2014 54.0 4.00 3.37 24.3% 8.9% 32.0% 0.67 0.313 0.310

Grilli’s fastball has consistently sat in the 92-94 range these last three years and he throws a frickin’ ton of sliders — 33.3% in 2014 and 29.5% from 2012-13. Only 16 of the 88 relievers who’ve thrown at least 150 innings over the last three seasons have thrown a higher percentage of sliders than Grilli. I guess that explains why he missed most of the second half of 2013 with a flexor strain in his elbow. Grilli also missed the entire 2010 season following right quad surgery and about a month this summer with an oblique strain.

If the Yankees were to lose Robertson to free agency, I like the idea of signing someone like Grilli to take over as the traditional one-inning closer. It doesn’t specifically have to be him — others like Sergio Romo, Casey Janssen, and even Rafael Soriano could work in that role — but the point is keeping Dellin Betances in that multi-inning setup role he was so damn good at in 2014. Let the inferior reliever start the ninth inning fresh with the bases empty while Betances handles the most high-leverage spots.

Grilli isn’t the sexiest bullpen option there, but he’s likely to take a one-year contract given his age and is just as likely to adequately close out ball games as any other low-cost option out there. If the Yankees won’t spend big to re-sign Robertson, then they probably won’t spend big for Andrew Miller either. Someone like Grilli is the best of the rest.