Don’t Trade McCann

No bats, only rebar. (Brian Blanco/Getty)
(Brian Blanco/Getty)

I have repeated this recently and will likely keep doing so until it either happens or doesn’t: the Yankees shouldn’t trade Brian McCann this offseason. The necessary caveat of ‘never say never’ applies, but as I see things, that perfect scenario is unlikely to occur. Like Mike laid out in his offseason plan, I’m of the belief that McCann should be retained:

Yes, I am keeping Brian McCann. I think he’s way more valuable to the Yankees on their roster as a part-time catcher/part-time DH than anything he could realistically fetch in a trade. He’s the perfect guy to mentor Gary Sanchez, and hey, if Sanchez falls on his face next year like Severino did this year, it’ll sure be nice to have McCann around. Quality lefty hitting catcher: worth keeping.

Unless the Yankees get supremely blown away by some deal that includes the other team taking on money AND sending back a prospect (not gonna happen), he’s likely to be more valuable to the Yankees than the trade pieces he fetches. After seeing the team shed Aroldis Chapman, Andrew Miller, and Carlos Beltran last season — all good moves, all right moves — it seems that a lot of fans got blood lust for trading veterans at any cost. And with Alex Rodriguez gone by mid-August, Mark Teixeira retiring, and CC Sabathia (and Jacoby Ellsbury) virtually unmovable, fans set their sights on a desire to deal McCann. And that sentiment is totally understandable, but perhaps a bit misguided.

Unlike those players traded at the 2016 deadline, McCann still has time left on his contract. And unlike Sabathia — fairly good 2016 notwithstanding — and Ellsbury, he’s still close enough to his true-talent level to keep around. Since joining the Yankees in 2014, McCann leads all AL catchers with 69 homers and is tied with Salvador Perez for first in fWAR at 6.7. He’s also second in wRC+ at 101, just behind Russell Martin and Stephen Vogt’s tied tally of 106.

(Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty)
(Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty)

Keeping McCann allows the Yankees patience in the further development of Gary Sanchez, as Mike noted above, and keeps strong bats in the lineup most every day. Both players have bats — and gloves, for that matter — that are worth keeping in the lineup each day and putting them in some sort of catching rotation maximizes their time at the plate and keeps them healthy for the times they’re behind it. Having them split time at catcher and DH — and maybe on occasional day a first for McCann in the event of Greg Bird needing a rest — is good for them personally and good for the team; not having a ‘backup’ type catcher means less chances of essentially punting games when the primary guy needs a day off.

For now, the Yankees should hold off on trading Brian McCann. That’s the stance I’m going to take and the hill I’m going to defend until further notice. Would trading him save the team some cash? Definitely. Would it bring back impact talent? Maybe. That second question needs to be a lot more sure, as does the Yankees’ roster situation. While it’s not horribly likely the team will be a 90+ win team competing for more than the wild card spot, that outlook could change by the end of the Hot Stove season. McCann could be a big part of a wining team. If it doesn’t work out that way, though, I’m always willing to reconsider around deadline time. But for now, don’t trade McCann.

DotF: Torres closing in on Arizona Fall League MVP honors

SS Gleyber Torres has a new fan: Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson. Reggie told William Boor he loves Gleyber’s “personality and character and presentation as a person,” among other things. Pretty neat. Here are some notes before we get to the weekly updates:

  • Matt Eddy has the full list of 534 minor league free agents. Here are the ten Yankees: RHP Tyler Cloyd, IF Cito Culver, RHP Claudio Custodio, IF Jonathan Diaz, RHP Gabe Encinas, C Santiago Nessy, OF Cesar Puello, C Eddy Rodriguez, UTIL Jose Rosario, and C Sebastian Valle. Culver and Puello are the most notable.
  • The Yankees have re-signed LHP Evan Rutckyj, according to Eddy. Kinda funny after he talked some trash about the Yankees while with the Braves as a Rule 5 Draft pick in Spring Training. Here’s what he said, in case you missed it.
  • Brian Cashman confirmed Torres will start next season with Double-A Trenton and “we’ll see where it goes from there,” reports Erik Boland. Reaching Triple-A as a 20-year-old would be pretty crazy. By the way, according to Cashman, the Yankees have not yet decided where SS Jorge Mateo will start 2017.
  • Cashman told Brendan Kuty the Yankees will continue to have Mateo work in center field in Spring Training. “He’s athletic as hell. In the Instructional League, it was very easy for him. So, if that’s a direction that we choose to go, it’s something he’ll be very good at,” said the GM.
  • For the second straight offseason, OF Aaron Judge will work with the team’s hitting gurus in Tampa, reports Kuty. “Got a couple of games (in MLB), saw what it’s like and now just get ready to prepare and come into next year not as an unknown. I’ll know what’s going on and what the league is and I’ll be prepared,” said Judge.
  • OF Edel Luaces and OF Erick Mendez were each suspended 50 games after failing performance-enhancing drug tests, MLB announced. Luaces tested positive for an amphetamine while with the rookie GCL Yankees. Mendez test positive for Propylhexedrine while with rookie Pulaski.
  • And finally, Torres claimed the top spot in this week’s Prospect Hot Sheet. He currently leads the Arizona Fall League in batting average as a 19-year-old. No one under 21 has ever won the league’s batting title.

Arizona Fall League

  • 3B Miguel Andujar: 16 G, 17-55, 9 R, 2 2B, 1 3B, 4 RBI, 9 BB, 7 K (.309/.400/.382) — Cashman said teams are asking for Andujar in trades
  • 1B Greg Bird: 16 G, 13-62, 8 R, 4 2B, 1 3B, 1 HR, 9 RBI, 11 BB, 16 K, 1 SB, 1 HBP (.210/.338/.355) — started out well but has slowed down of late … as long as the shoulder is healthy, I don’t care what the numbers are
  • SS Gleyber Torres: 15 G, 20-51, 13 R, 3 2B, 1 3B, 3 HR, 10 RBI, 13 BB, 6 K, 3 SB, 2 CS (.392/.516/.667) — leads the league in AVG, OBP, and OPS, and is second in SLG … Gleyber’s got a pretty good chance at being AzFL MVP, I’d say
  • UTIL Tyler Wade: 13 G, 8-40, 12 R, 1 3B, 2 RBI, 9 BB, 10 K, 6 SB (.200/.347/.250) — he’s played one game at second, one at third, two in left, five in center, and four in right
  • LHP Nestor Cortes: 4 G, 5 IP, 5 IP, 6 H, 4 R, 4 ER, 4 BB, 6 K (7.20 ERA and 2.00 WHIP)
  • RHP J.P. Feyereisen: 8 G, 10 IP, 12 H, 5 R, 4 ER, 6 BB, 13 K, 1 WP (3.60 ERA and 1.80 WHIP) — last five outings: 6 IP, 5 H, 0 R, 2 BB, 11 K
  • RHP James Kaprielian: 6 G, 6 GS, 22.2 IP, 21 H, 16 R, 13 ER, 6 BB, 22 K, 4 HR (5.16 ERA and 1.19 WHIP) — Kyle Glaser says Kaprielian was 95-96 mph with his fastball, 85-87 mph with his slider, and 82-83 mph with his changeup in his last start, and he missed bats in the strike zone with all three
  • RHP Brody Koerner: 5 G, 3 GS, 16 IP, 19 H, 13 R, 11 ER, 9 BB, 10 K, 1 HR, 1 WP (6.19 ERA and 1.75 WHIP) — returning in the AzFL after missing a bunch of time with an injury usually equals a rude awakening
  • RHP Dillon Tate: 6 G, 9.1 IP, 9 H, 4 R, 4 ER, 1 BB, 11 K, 2 HR 2 HB (3.86 ERA and 1.07 WHIP) — hasn’t appeared in a game since October 29th, so that’s not good

Dominican Winter League

  • IF Abi Avelino: 8 G, 3-13, 2 R, 2 K (.231/.231/.231) — he’s a bench player and pinch-runner here
  • IF Jorge Mateo: 12 G, 6-41, 3 R, 1 2B, 1 3B, 2 RBI, 2 BB, 10 K, 1 SB, 1 HBP (.146/.205/.220) — still playing shortstop exclusively
  • RHP Anyelo Gomez: 1 G, 1 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 2 K
  • RHP Adonis Rosa: 2 G, 1 GS, 5 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 2 BB, 2 K (0.00 ERA and 0.40 WHIP)

Mexican Pacific League

  • OF Tito Polo: 16 G, 14-58, 11 R, 4 2B, 1 RBI, 4 BB, 17 K, 8 SB, 1 CS, 3 HBP (.241/.323/.310) — left a game with an injury last week, but he returned to action this week, so it was nothing serious

The Roberto Clemente Professional Baseball League (Puerto Rico) started its season last week. IF Vince Conde and OF Aaron Judge are both listed on rosters, though they haven’t played yet. Considering Judge ended the season hurt (oblique) and is slated to work in Tampa this offseason, I’m guessing he won’t play either.

Venezuelan Winter League

  • IF Angel Aguilar: 8 G, 2-8, 4 R, 4 K, 1 SB (.250/.250/.250)
  • C Francisco Diaz: 22 G, 15-63, 5 R, 3 2B, 2 3B, 2 RBI, 5 BB, 13 K, 1 SB (.238/.294/.349) — with C Kyle Higashioka ticketed for Triple-A Scranton, the soon-to-be 27-year-old Diaz figures to be the regular catcher at Double-A Trenton next year
  • RHP Luis Cedeno: 3 G, 1 GS, 8.1 IP, 9 H, 7 R, 5 ER, 4 BB, 7 K, 2 HR, 1 GB, 2 WP (5.40 ERA and 1.56 WHIP)
  • RHP David Kubiak: 7 G, 2 GS, 17 IP, 18 H, 15 R, 13 ER, 7 BB, 14 K, 1 HR, 2 HBP, 3 WP (6.88 ERA and 1.47 WHIP)
  • RHP Mark Montgomery: 5 G, 3.2 IP, 4 H, 3 R, 3 ER, 3 BB, 3 K (7.36 ERA and 1.91 WHIP)
  • LHP Miguel Sulbaran, RHP Daniel Alvarez, 3B Daniel Barrios, RHP Alex Mejias, 3B Andres Chaparro, OF Andres Fernandez, and C David Vergel are all listed on rosters as well.

Hot Stove Notes: Jansen, Melancon, Cespedes, Bautista

Kenley. (Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty)
Kenley. (Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty)

Yesterday afternoon the GM Meetings wrapped up in Scottsdale and everyone headed home to really get down to offseason business. This week we learned the Yankees have already been in touch with Aroldis Chapman’s people, have some interest in Kendrys Morales, and have identified a possible trade partner for Brian McCann. Here are some more bits of news and notes from the GM Meetings.

Yankees willing to eat money to move McCann

According to Jeff Passan, the Yankees have expressed a willingness to eat up to half the $34M left on McCann’s contract to facilitate a trade. The catch: they want better young players in return. That’s usually how this works. I said yesterday I hope the Yankees are open to eating some money in exchange for a better return, and it appears they are willing to do just that. Hooray.

Yankees reached out to Jansen, Melancon

In addition to Chapman, the Yankees reached out to the representatives for both Kenley Jansen and Mark Melancon this week, reports Brendan Kuty. The Yankees are said to be targeting a top free agent reliever this winter, and those two along with Chapman are by far the best available. Jansen received a qualifying offer and will cost a draft pick. Chapman and Melancon will not. They were ineligible for the qualifying offer after being traded at midseason.

There’s been some talk we could see the first $100M reliever this offseason — Jonathan Papelbon’s $50M deal with the Phillies is still the largest contract ever given to a reliever, so we’re talking about doubling that — but I don’t think that will happen. I don’t think teams are ready to commit that much to a 65-inning pitcher, even if they are 65 high-leverage innings. Andrew Miller‘s postseason usage is still fresh in everyone’s mind. Once we get further away from that and people remember relievers don’t get used like that all the time, contract expectations will change.

Yankees planning to talk to Hill

Amazingly, the best free agent starter on the market this year is journeyman southpaw Rich Hill, who reinvented himself two years ago by raising his arm angle and moving to the extreme third base side of the rubber. Brian Cashman told Kuty he intends to reach out to Hill, who pitched out of the bullpen for the Yankees in September 2014, at some point soon.

“I can’t remember if I have (reached out to him) or not. Let’s put it this way. I will be reaching out to Rich’s agent if I haven’t yet. I have a to-do list I’m working through,” said the GM. Hill will be 37 in March and he hasn’t thrown more than 120 innings since 2007, but the market is so light on starting pitching that he’s going to end up with a three-year contract. When healthy this year, Hill pitched like an ace (2.12 ERA and 2.39 FIP). The Yankees need pitching too, so checking in on the best available starter only makes sense.

Yankees have checked in on Cespedes, Bautista

(Adam Hunger/Getty)
(Adam Hunger/Getty)

The Yankees have reached out to free agent sluggers Yoenis Cespedes and Jose Bautista, reports Jon Heyman. Both guys would give the team some much-needed middle of the order thump, but Cashman downplayed their interest and chalked it up to due diligence. “I’m open to anything. But as of right now, we’re going to let the kids take a shot. Our current focus is to let the kids try to take the job,” he said.

Bautista and especially Cespedes are true impact bats who change the entire complexion of the lineup. The Yankees could use a hitter like that! Right now, given the team’s current situation, spending big on a corner outfield bat over 30 doesn’t seem like the best idea. If they were ready to win right now, then yes, sign one of those guys. But the Yankees aren’t. They’re right to prioritize the kids, especially with Aaron Judge arriving this past season and Clint Frazier not far behind.

Yankees in on Logan

Blast from the past: The Yankees are among the teams interested in lefty Boone Logan, according to Joel Sherman. Right now Tommy Layne is New York’s top lefty reliever, and he’s followed on the depth chart by guys like Richard Bleier and Chasen Shreve. Eh. I don’t blame the Yankees at all for looking at the bullpen lefty market. Here’s 2016 Logan vs. 2016 Layne:

IP ERA FIP AVG/OBP/SLG vs. LHB K% vs. LHB BB% vs. LHB GB% vs. LHB
Logan 46.1 3.69 3.23 .139/.222/.255 33.6% 7.6% 60.6%
Layne 44.2 3.63 3.93 .214/.310/.261 20.8% 9.9% 51.6%

The question really isn’t whether Logan is better than Layne. It’s whether Logan is better than Bleier and Shreve and James Pazos. Those guys. I don’t love the idea of carrying two lefty specialists in the bullpen, especially with a rotation that doesn’t pitch deep into games, but it is doable. My guess is Logan gets more money elsewhere and the Yankees are just kicking the tires out of due diligence.

Teams calling on Andujar

The Yankees are getting phone calls and receiving trade interest in third base prospect Miguel Andujar, reports Kuty. “I get a lot of compliments on him from other clubs, a lot of teams asking me about him. He’s going to be a big leaguer,” said Cashman. I’m guessing Andujar is not the team’s only prospect generating trade interest. The Yankees have many quality players in their system at the moment.

Andujar, 22 in March, is currently hitting .309/.400/.392 (122 wRC+) with more walks (nine) than strikeouts (seven) through 16 Arizona Fall League games. He broke out with a .270/.327/.407 (108 wRC+) batting line and 12 home runs in 137 games split between High-A and Double-A during the regular season. Andujar is the closest thing the Yankees have to a third baseman of the future, and while I certainly wouldn’t make him off-limits in trade talks, I am excited to see him take another step forward in 2017.

Sanchez: Blue Jays sign Lourdes Gurriel to seven-year deal

Lourdes Jr. (Getty)
Lourdes Jr. (Getty)

Not surprisingly, a team other than the Yankees has signed free agent Cuban infielder Lourdes Gurriel Jr. That team is the Blue Jays, according to Jesse Sanchez. Joel Sherman hears it’s a seven-year contract worth $22M. Because of his age, the deal does not count against Toronto’s international spending pool.

Lourdes and his older brother Yulieski defected last year. They were two of the very best players left in Cuba. Yulieski, 32, signed a five-year deal worth $47.5M with the Astros in July. Following a brief stint in the minors, he was called up to Houston and hit .262/.292/.385 (82 wRC+) with three homers in 36 games.

The 23-year-old Lourdes is considered a lesser player than his brother and a very good but not great prospect. He’s not another Yoan Moncada. The consensus is Lourdes will need some time in the minors before helping out at the big league level, like his brother. Both Gurriels are infielders.

The Yankees reportedly worked out both Gurriel brothers over the last few months, though, as has been the case with big name Cuban players for a while now, they didn’t sign either one. The last high-profile Cuban player signed by the Yankees was Jose Contreras.

The Never-Ending Search for Quality Utility Players [2016 Season Review]

Ackley. (Presswire)
Ackley. (Presswire)

Building a quality bench is more difficult than it seems. Bench players are like relievers. Their performance can fluctuate wildly from year to year because they inherently work in small sample sizes, and weird stuff happens in small samples. A bench guy will hit .330 with a ton of clutch hits one year, then struggle to get off the interstate the next. Happens all the time. That’s baseball.

The Yankees have spent the last few years building their bench through trades and from within. Signing free agent bench players is tough. Bench guys usually look for the most playing time when they hit free agency, and the Yankees rarely offer that. They tend to have a defined roster with set players at each position. This year, the Yankees cycled through a pair of bench players — one acquired via trade, the other developed from within — capable of playing first base, second base, and right field. Neither worked out too well.

The Good Fit Who Didn’t Hit

Last year at the trade deadline the Yankees made just one small trade, acquiring Dustin Ackley from the Mariners for spare parts Ramon Flores and Jose Ramirez. Ackley, a former top prospect and No. 2 pick in the draft, seemed like a decent enough upside play. He’s versatile, and the Mariners haven’t had much success developing hitters over the years, so a change of scenery could have helped.

Ackley, now 28, had a nice little run with the Yankees after the trade, hitting .288/.333/.654 (162 wRC+) with four homers in 57 games. His spot on the 2016 bench was secure. Ackley had a very strong Spring Training, putting up a .298/.313/.404 batting line, and I remember wondering how the Yankees would get him in the lineup. They’d have to sit Mark Teixeira now and then, same with Starlin Castro and Carlos Beltran. And Alex Rodriguez.

Once the season started, Ackley rarely played, and when he did get a chance to play, he didn’t perform. That seems to be how these things work. A guy appears to fit the roster well based on his positional versatility and bat, but he doesn’t play. Call it the Curse of Garrett Jones™. Ackley appeared in nine of the Yankees’ first 29 games and started only four of them. During that time he went 2-for-17 (.118) at the plate. Yeah.

Injuries to A-Rod, Teixeira, and Jacoby Ellsbury opened up some playing time in May, so at one point Ackley started 13 of 24 team games and appeared in six others. In those 24 team games, he went 7-for-44 (.159). On May 29th, Ackley’s season came to an abrupt end when he managed to tear the labrum in his right shoulder diving back into first base on a pickoff throw.

Pretty much exactly what happened to Mason Williams last year. Dove back into first and tore up his shoulder. Sucks. Ackley actually remained in that game initially. He ran the bases and played another inning in the field before being removed. Tests after the game revealed the labrum tear. Ackley had his season-ending surgery five days later.

In 28 games and 70 plate appearances this season, Ackley hit .148/.243/.148 (11 wRC+) with six runs scored, four runs driven in, eight walks, and nine strikes. He did not have an extra-base hit or a multi-hit game. Ackley saw his most action at first base (85 innings), and he also saw time in right (54.1 innings) and at second base (one inning). Not to be forgotten is this great play at Camden Yards:

That’s pretty much the only notable thing Ackley did this past season. MLBTR projects him to receive a $3.2M salary through arbitration next year, and while that represents no raise at all, it’s too much for a fringe player coming off major shoulder surgery. Ackley was a non-tender candidate before the injury. The surgery made him a lock. The Yankees could bring him back on a minor league contract, but, as is often the case with these players, Ackley will look for the greatest opportunity, which figures to take him elsewhere.

The Utility Man in Training

Over the past two seasons the Yankees have made it pretty clear they believe Rob Refsnyder is most valuable in a utility role. They didn’t give him a chance at second base last year whenever Stephen Drew slipped into one of his long stretches of nothingness, and when Refsnyder showed up to Spring Training this year, the Yankees pointed him towards third base and said get to work.

During Grapefruit League play Refsnyder saw most of his work at the hot corner, playing 54.1 innings at third compared to only 27 at second. He didn’t see any time in the outfield. For the most part Refsnyder handled himself well. He made the routine plays and that was about it. He didn’t look comfortable there, but he handled it well. At least until taking ground balls to the face on consecutive days at the end of March. Ouch.

The Yankees went with Ronald Torreyes for their backup infielder spot — fun fact: Torreyes is 17 months younger than Refsnyder — mostly because he can play shortstop and is a better all-around defender than Refsnyder. The Yankees sent Refsnyder to Triple-A Scranton and had him continue working out at third base. He also got reacquainted with right field. The team tried to make him as versatile as possible.

Refsnyder was called up for the first time in mid-May, after A-Rod landed on the DL with a hamstring injury. That stint in the show lasted one game. He started in right field on May 28th, when 1-for-3 with a double against the Athletics in Oakland, then was sent down five days later. Four days after that, he was called back up. Refsnyder returned after Ackley blew out his shoulder diving into first base.

Refsnyder. (Presswire)
Refsnyder. (Presswire)

The second stint with the Yankees was much longer than the first. Refsnyder remained with the big league team until mid-August, and during this stint the club gave him a crash course at first base to help cover during Teixeira’s knee injury. Refsnyder had literally one afternoon session with infield coach Joe Espada before getting a start at first base. The Yankees threw him to the wolves.

As with third base in Spring Training, Refsnyder’s early work at first base was fine. He made the plays he was supposed to make, though occasionally his inexperience showed. He’d wander too far off the base for a ball he should have let the second baseman take, that sort of thing. All things considered, Refsnyder handled the new position well on such short notice. He spent three weeks as the everyday first baseman while Teixeira was hurt too.

Once Teixeira returned, Refsnyder became a platoon player who was regularly in the lineup against righties, often hitting second. Usually he played right field, but he also saw action at first base, second base, and even some left field. Following a quick demotion to Triple-A in August — the Yankees were running thin on arms at the time and needed bullpen reinforcements — Refsnyder returned once rosters expanded in September and resumed his role as a platoon player.

Through three different call-ups, the 25-year-old Refsnyder hit .250/.328/.309 (72 wRC+) with good strikeout (17.1%) and walk (10.3%) rates in 175 plate appearances with the big league team. He also hit .274/.370/.355 (94 wRC+) against lefties. His at-bats were good, Refsnyder is a grinder at the plate, but he also hit for no power. Literally zero home runs despite calling Yankee Stadium home and watching balls fly out of the park all around the league all summer.

Refsnyder socked eight doubles in his first 83 at-bats with the Yankees, which is really good, especially considering he played sparingly. He then had one extra-base hit, a double, in his final 92 plate appearances of the season. Yikes. Here, look at Refsnyder’s spray chart, via Baseball Savant:

Rob Refsnyder spray chart

I count four balls hit to the warning track on the fly. In 175 plate appearances. Goodness. Refsnyder’s average batted ball distance was a mere 197 feet. That’s slap hitter territory. Chris Stewart (197 feet), Denard Span (196 feet), and Ichiro Suzuki (195 feet) reside there. Refsnyder, whose calling card is his bat, put the ball on the ground way too often (52.8%) and didn’t generate enough hard contact (26.4% vs. 31.4% MLB average).

Give Refsnyder credit. He worked really hard to learn third base and then first base on the fly in an effort to make himself more valuable to the Yankees. And perhaps all the work he did on the defensive side of the ball took away from his offense. Refsnyder wouldn’t be the first guy to go through that. Either way, he’s a bat first player whose bat wasn’t good enough in 2016. Quality at-bats are nice! But more production is needed going forward.

I really have no idea what the future holds for Refsnyder at this point. I could see him being an up-and-down bench guy next year. I could see him spending the entire season as a platoon bat. I could see him getting traded. There’s a whole world of possibilities. Refsnyder has one more minor league option left for next year, so the Yankees have some time. He’s a nice depth player to have. At some point though, Refsnyder’s going to have to take an opportunity and run with with it.

Mailbag: Goldschmidt, Hammel, Cabrera, Zimmermann

Only nine questions in the mailbag this week, but they’re nine good ones, and some of the answers are longer than usual. RABmailbag (at) gmail (dot) com is the place to send us questions and comments throughout the week.

(Dustin Bradford/Getty)
Goldy. (Dustin Bradford/Getty)

Nate asks: I’m hearing rumors that Goldschmidt could be traded. What kind of package would it take for the Yankees to land him?

They aren’t really rumors, it’s mostly just speculation. The Diamondbacks just hired Mike Hazen away from the Red Sox to be their new GM, and anytime a new GM is hired, the assumption seems to be he’ll tear it all down and rebuild. With Arizona, you could argue that rebuild is necessary. I think they might be a little closer to contention than the consensus though. Who knows.

If the D’Backs do put Paul Goldschmidt on the market — and assuming Hazen doesn’t trade him to Boston for a bunch of prospects he fell in love with while there — then yes, the Yankees should absolutely, 100% be in on him. Goldschmidt is a bonafide franchise player and MVP caliber performer. You open the farm system and make everyone available, even the Gleyber Torreses and Clint Fraziers.

The facts: Goldschmidt turned 29 in September and he hit .297/.411/.489 (134 wRC+) with 24 home runs and 32 steals in 37 attempts in 2016. That was his worst season since 2012. The guy hit .309/.412/.556 (158 wRC+) from 2013-15 and averaged 29 homers and 15 steals per season, and he’s maybe the smartest hitter in MLB in terms of making adjustments and reading pitchers. Goldschmidt is also a top notch defensive first baseman and an all-around swell guy. Assuming his club options are picked up, he’s owed only $34.475M from 2017-19. Peanuts.

I can’t think of a comparable player who’s been traded in recent years. Josh Donaldson? He was four years from free agency, not three, and the Athletics gave him away. Miguel Cabrera? He was two years from free agency and that was nearly a decade ago now. Hanley Ramirez? He was two and a half years from free agency when the Marlins sent him to the Dodgers, and the Marlins were sick of him. There’s no good trade benchmark.

If I were the D’Backs, I couldn’t trade Goldschmidt to the Yankees without getting Gary Sanchez in return. He’s a must have. Sanchez, Torres, and Greg Bird is my starting point, then I want another piece or two. I’m thinking one of the MLB ready starters (Luis Cessa, Chad Green, Bryan Mitchell, etc.) and a lower profile prospect like Chance Adams. Sanchez, Bird, Torres, Adams, and say Cessa for Goldschmidt. Yay or nay? I think you could argue a) it’s not unreasonable for the D’Backs to demand that, and b) it doesn’t make sense for the Yankees to do that at this point in time.

Eugene asks: In the never gonna happen department, is someone like Andrew Cashner a candidate to become the next Miller-ian relief monster? He’s a tall semi-failed starter named Andrew with facial hair.

No. The big difference between Andrew Miller and all these “throws hard as a starter but still kind sucks anyway” guys like Cashner and Nathan Eovaldi is his slider. Miller has that devastating slider to go with his big fastball. (It also helps being 6-foot-7 with those long arms and long extension.) Cashner and Eovaldi don’t have that dominant secondary pitch. I do think those guys would be more effective in relief — almost everyone is more effective in relief — but not Miller-esque. Miller’s a different animal.

Matt asks: I know this is nitpicky but it’s been reported several places (including the BA Yankees top 10) that Cashman had the choice between Gleyber Torres and Eloy Jimenez. I know what the rankings say and that decision like this should be about talent and not position but I’ve definitely been left wondering if this was a mistake. With the glut of SS prospects the Yankees have and the lack of power in the MLB, was passing on a guy like Jimenez, who has the pedigree, athleticism, and power to be come a middle of the order bat in favor of Torres a mistake?

That’s what was reported at the time of the trade. The Yankees had their pick of Torres and Jimenez, and opted for the shortstop over the corner outfielder even with their glut of shortstops. Why? Because shortstops tend to be the best athletes are most capable of moving to other positions. The Yankees have some quality corner outfield bats — to be fair, they hadn’t yet acquired Frazier at the time of the Aroldis Chapman/Torres trade — but not as many as they do shortstops.

Jimenez, 19, hit .329/.369/.432 (169 wRC+) with 14 homers in 464 plate appearances in Low-A ball this year. He really jumped into the national spotlight at the Futures Game this summer.

For what it’s worth, Baseball America ranked Torres and Jimenez as the 27th and 46th best prospects in baseball, respectively, in their midseason top 100, about three weeks before the trade deadline. Keith Law (subs. req’d) had Torres 26th and Jimenez 29th at midseason. MLB.com currently has Torres 17th and Jimenez 23rd. So they’re close. These are two very highly regarded teenage prospects.

There’s really no wrong answer here. The Yankees could have had the brute force corner outfield masher, or the more well-rounded shortstop. I would have gone with the shortstop as well. There are some plate discipline concerns with Jimenez, and he’s already playing a non-premium position. Gleyber projects to be a pretty damn good hitter himself, and he does more on the bases and in the field. I’d be happy with either guy. All other things being equal though, give me the shortstop and the better athlete. (And the guy who is a level closer to MLB too.)

P.J. asks: Assuming Jason Hammel is healthy and considering he’ll pitch most of 2017 at 34 years old is he worth it for the Yankees to make a serious run at this winter on a 2 or 3 year deal? Does he fit the bill as a #2 to slot in behind Tanaka and in front of Sabathia?

I was really surprised the Cubs declined Hammel’s $12M option. They had to pay him a $2M buyout anyway, so it was essentially a $10M decision. In this market $10M buys you about 120 league average innings, maybe less. For what it’s worth, Jesse Rogers says the Cubs let Hammel make the decision. He could either return to Chicago or test the market, so of course he picked free agency. Weird.

Anyway, I’m not sure I’d pencil Hammel in as a No. 2 starter, but I do think he’d be a solid addition to the rotation. He had a 3.83 ERA (4.48 FIP) in 30 starts and 166.2 innings this year, though his peripherals were pretty mediocre: 20.8% strikeouts, 7.7% walks, 42.1% grounders, and 1.35 HR/9. Hammel played in front of a historically great defense this season, something he probably won’t get to do next year regardless where he signs.

MLBTR projects three years and $42M for Hammel and that sounds about right to me. He just turned 34 in September, and it’s worth noting he ran out of gas the last two seasons. Hammel really limped to the finish, so much so that he wasn’t even on the Cubs’ postseason roster. I don’t think he’s a No. 2 at all, but I do think Hammel would be a nice add to the back of the rotation. He’d help, for sure.

Michael asks: Any interest in trading for Evan Longoria? His contract is not unreasonable and the Rays might be anxious to move him as they rebuild before his 10/5 rights kick in.

It would behoove the Rays to make him available, I think. Longoria just turned 31 and his best years are likely behind him. There’s also six years and $99M left on his contract, and for a small payroll club like Tampa, that could turn into a real albatross whenever his game slips for good. Chances are Longoria’s trade value is only going down from here, so this is their best chance to deal him and his remaining contract for a big prospect package.

As good as he is, I’m actually going to say pass on Longoria. I doubt the Rays would trade him to the Yankees anyway, but still. I’m totally cool with riding it out with Chase Headley for another two years, seeing what happens with Miguel Andujar, and leaving the door open for the Manny Machado (after 2018) and Nolan Arenado (after 2019) free agencies. Plus there’s a chance Torres winds up at third base in deference to Didi Gregorius too.

Jesse asks: Given the high trade value of elite relievers, does it make any sense to sign more than one of the top bullpen arms, then trade one at the deadline again?

Sure, in theory, but I imagine those guys are going to want a no-trade clause as part of their free agent contracts. They’re in position to demand it. Chapman was traded twice in the last year and Mark Melancon has been traded four times total. I doubt they want to go through that again. Kenley Jansen has never been traded, but he doesn’t need to experience it to know it can be hectic. These guys will get no-trades, I’m sure.

Also, one thing to keep in mind is potential damage to the team’s reputation. The Marlins have been signing players to big free agent contracts and trading them a year later for a while now. It doesn’t look good. A few players have turned down more money from the Marlins to sign elsewhere because of that. C.J. Wilson is the most notable. We can say “sign this free agent and just trade him,” but agents and other players around the league will notice, and you don’t want to develop a reputation for being player unfriendly.

Miggy. (Hannah Foslien/Getty)
Miggy. (Hannah Foslien/Getty)

Julian asks: I know we all want Greg Bird to fit in and immediately succeed as the new full time first basement, but with the Tigers apparently putting Miggy (Miguel Cabrera) on the table – should the Yankees look to him as another option? He’s expensive, but still only 33 and owed a ton of money for a long time but if the Tigers ate some (similar to Prince Fielder) would it be worth it?

Expensive is putting it mildly. There’s $212M (!) left on Cabrera’s contract through 2023. He turns 34 in April and is signed through age 40. Cabrera is still great! He hit .316/.393/.563 (152 wRC+) with 38 home runs this year and will go down as one of the ten best right-handed hitters in history when it’s all said and done. Maybe even one of the top five. I don’t want to undersell his greatness. Miggy is truly one of the best hitters baseball has ever seen.

Now, that said, this is the kind of contract the Yankees have been trying to get away from the last few years. Contracts with huge dollars committed to players over 30 whose best years are behind them. As good as Cabrera is, he’s not the hitter he was three or four years ago, and chances are he’s only going to get worse from here. Goldschmidt is in his prime and he’s signed dirt cheap. Cabrera isn’t. If the Yankees were a bonafide contender looking to get over the top, circumstances would be different. But they’re not. They’re a quasi-rebuilding team that needs more youth, not another albatross.

Chris asks: Any interest in Zimmermann with the Tigers? If so, what sort of haul would you expect it to take in terms of prospects?

Remember back in April when everyone was like “see I told you we should have signed Jordan Zimmermann, best contract of the offseason!” because he made three or four great starts? Good times. The guy finished the year with a 4.87 ERA (4.42 FIP) in 105.1 innings while visiting the disabled list a few times. The Tigers would probably love to unload this contract now.

The only way I’d trade for Zimmermann right now is in a bad contract-for-bad contract swap with Jacoby Ellsbury. There’s four years and $92M left on Zimmermann’s deal and four years and $89.5M left on Ellsbury’s deal. The Yankees need a starter more than they need an outfielder. I don’t see why the Tigers would want do that though. They’re trying to get younger and shed payroll. Zimmermann-for-Ellsbury does neither.

There are too many red flags for me to consider giving up actual prospects for Zimmermann and his contract. His strikeout rate (14.7%) was by far a career worst this year, and both his walk (5.8%) and homer (1.22 HR/9) rates were his worst since his rookie year way back when. There’s also this, via Brooks Baseball:

Jordan Zimmermann velocity

Hmmm. Ominous trend is ominous. Yeah, I’m going to say steer clear. I do think Zimmermann-for-Ellsbury would be worthwhile for the Yankees because it clears a logjam in the outfield and potentially addresses a need in the rotation. You’ve got to pay all that money anyway. You’d just be redistributing it to another part of the roster. But actual prospects with real value for Zimmermann? Nah. Not at this point of his career.

Steve asks: Classic hindsight question: given the SP “market”, was holding Nova and making a qualified offer the better route?

No way. Ivan Nova was so very far from a qualifying offer candidate when the Yankees traded him. The only reason he and his agent are talking about a $75M deal (!) right now are those eleven good starts with the Pirates, more than half of which were against the rebuilding Reds, Brewers, and Phillies. Could you imagine dropping a one-year deal worth $17.2M in front of Nova earlier this season? Not a chance. Someone’s going to pay big money to Nova assuming the Pirates version is the real him, and based on Ivan’s track record, they’re going to be disappointed.