Carter is starting to reward the Yankees for their patience

All he does is catch touchdowns and hit home runs. (Presswire)
All he does is catch touchdowns and hit home runs. (Presswire)

For the first month of the season, Chris Carter was an imperfect bench piece on a Yankees team focused on getting younger. Bringing in a 41-homer bat on the cheap made a world of sense, especially with Greg Bird coming off shoulder surgery, but early on Carter was a man without a role. He could pinch-hit and spot start. That’s it. His usefulness was very limited.

A nagging ankle issue landed Bird on the disabled earlier this month, which opened playing time for Carter. And in his first seven games (five starts) after Bird’s injury, Carter went 3-for-19 (.158) with nine strikeouts. He struggled so much that Joe Girardi elected to play Matt Holliday at first base three times, including in back-to-back games, even though he didn’t play the field once in Spring Training. Not one inning.

Fans turned on Carter long ago. About two weeks into the regular season, I’d day. Fans aren’t exactly known for their patience, after all. The Yankees weren’t going to cut bait so soon, however. Not with Bird and Tyler Austin on the disabled list. Playing 37-year-old Holliday at first base everyday wasn’t a viable solution either. At this point of his career the smart move is keeping him off his feet as much as possible.

“Carter is very streaky and hasn’t gotten hot yet,” said Brian Cashman to Dan Martin over the weekend. Since that comment, Carter has started to get hot. He reached base three times in Sunday’s doubleheader, going 2-for-6 with a double and a walk, then last night he went 3-for-4 with one of his trademark effortless home runs. Carter flicked his wrists and the ball carried out to right-center.

The home run was sandwiched between a ground ball single through the left side of the infield and a little line drive single poked the other way against the shift. No one will claim Carter is a great pure hitter. That was just a good optic, a single the other way. Carter is what he is. He’s a one-dimensional power hitter who is going to strike out. Everyone knows that. The problem was he didn’t show much power to offset the strikeouts the first six weeks of the season.

It’s difficult for most players to remain productive while receiving sporadic playing time, and when you’re contact challenged like Carter, it can be close to impossible. Those guys don’t have much margin for error to start with anyway. Take away at-bats and screw up their rhythm and forget it. They might … do exactly what Carter did the first few weeks of the season, which was not much at all.

Now Carter is getting a chance to play regularly as a result of Bird’s injury, and over the last few days, he’s beginning to contribute at the plate. Who knows. Maybe it’s only three good games and nothing more. That’s possible. These last few games could also be an indication Carter is starting to get locked in, and when he gets locked in, he tends to hit the ball out of the part with regularity. It would be cool if he started to do that.

Keep in mind the Yankees don’t need Carter to be a big part of the offense. He’s been hitting eighth and ninth lately. Anything he can give them from the bottom of the order will be a nice little bonus. Also keep in mind that Bird and Austin are still hurt, as is Triple-A first baseman Ji-Man Choi. He was recently placed on the disabled list with a hamstring injury. The first base depth chart has been thinned out, so Carter’s job is safe for the foreseeable future.

For the time being, the Yankees have stuck with Carter, and he’s started to reward their faith the last few days. Hopefully it lasts. There are going to be strikeouts. They come with the territory. But if the ball starts flying out of the park a little more often, and some more ground balls find holes, the Yankees will be happy they stuck with Carter, especially while Bird is out. They gave him a chance to right the ship, and it seems like he is doing exactly that.

Sanchez and Carter power Yankees to 7-1 win over Royals

Good start to the road trip and good start to the 20 games in 20 days stretch. The Yankees received good hitting, good pitching, and even good defense in Tuesday night’s series opening 7-1 win over the Royals. More games like this, please.

Yo Soy Dinger. (Presswire)
Yo Soy Dinger. (Presswire)

Power At The Top Of The Lineup, Power At The Bottom Of The Lineup
You could tell early on it was only a matter of time until the Yankees got to Royals starter Jason Hammel. The four batters they sent to the plate in the first inning all hit rockets in the air, though three were caught for outs. A few more hard-hit balls followed in the second inning. Hammel threw 30 pitches in the first two innings and the Yankees didn’t swing and miss once.

In the third, those hard-hit balls started to turn into results. Chris Carter started the inning with a ground ball single through the left side of the infield, then Brett Gardner worked a six-pitch walk to put men on first and second with no outs. The two baserunners turned into a 3-0 lead on Gary Sanchez‘s third home run of the season, a long fly ball to dead center field. It was Gary’s second home run since coming back from the biceps injury. Hooray Gary.

The Yankees struck for two more runs in the fourth inning, and it was a two-out rally. Didi Gregorius fouled off four two-strike pitches before slapping a single with two outs, setting up Carter for a towering two-run home run to left-center field. Effortless power, man. The guy flicks his wrists and the ball just carries. Homers by Sanchez, the No. 2 hitter, and Carter, the No. 9 hitter, gave the Yankees a 5-0 lead against the worst offensive team in baseball.

(Presswire)
(Presswire)

Almost Seven Strong For CC
Nice bounceback for CC Sabathia. It helped that the Royals, thanks to team-wide willingness to expand the zone (AL worst 32.7% chase rate), were a good matchup for late-career Sabathia. Hey, I’ll take it. Sabathia’s last four starts were pretty terrible, and if took an impatient team for him to turn in an effective start, that’s okay with me. It wasn’t until the seventh inning that the Royals got a runner to second base, and that was an Eric Hosmer hustle double.

Prior to that seventh inning, Sabathia limited Kansas City to three singles and a walk in six scoreless innings, and one of those singles turned into an out when Jorge Soler was throwing out trying to stretch it into a double. Sabathia needed only 62 innings in those six innings too. He had a seven-pitch inning (fourth), two eight-pitch innings (first and sixth), and a ten-pitch inning (fifth). Sabathia was on cruise control. Nice and easy.

The seventh inning rally that ended Sabathia’s night was kinda stupid. Hosmer turned a single into a hustle double to start the frame, Soler took a borderline full count pitch for ball four with two outs, then Alex Gordon beat out an infield single to load the bases. Chase Headley made a nice play going back on the ball, but with his momentum taking him into the outfield, he had little chance to throw Gordon out at first. Bases loaded, two outs.

Tyler Clippard replaced Sabathia after the Gordon infield single and struck out someone named Whit Merrifield to end the threat. Sabathia’s final line: 6.2 IP, 5 H, 0 R, 2 BB, 4 K on 85 pitches. It seemed like he still had something left in the tank when he was removed too, but with the bases loaded and the lefty mashing Merrifield due up, Joe Girardi didn’t want to mess around. Good outing for Sabathia. We were all hoping to see a start like this.

(Presswire)
(Presswire)

Leftovers
The Yankees tacked on insurance runs in the seventh inning (Jacoby Ellsbury single) and eighth inning (Matt Holliday fielder’s choice). Holliday hit a rocket with the bases loaded and one out, but the annoyingly good at defense Mike Moustakas made a great stab and was able to throw to second. Holliday narrowly beat out the return throw to avoid the inning-ending double play.

Clippard stayed in to pitch the eighth and tossed up a zero. Jonathan Holder got the ninth inning and it went strikeout, single, walk, infield single, fielder’s choice (run scores), pop-up. Meh. Holder’s been pretty good overall. He picked a good time to have a less than clean inning. The Yankees needed an easy bullpen game like this after Luis Severino and Masahiro Tanaka combined to throw four (!) innings in Sunday’s doubleheader.

The Yankees did not strike out at all until the top of the ninth, when Al Alburquerque struck out the side. Go figure. Every starter had a hit except Gardner (walk) and Holliday (RBI fielder’s choice). Sanchez, Starlin Castro, Aaron Judge, and Gregorius each had two hits. Carter had three. Nice night up and down the lineup.

Box Score, WPA Graph & Standings
Head over to ESPN for the box score and updated standings, and MLB.com for the video highlights. Make sure you don’t miss our Bullpen Workload page either. Here’s the win probability graph:


Source: FanGraphs

Up Next
Same two teams Wednesday night, in the middle game of this three-game series. Michael Pineda and Jason Vargas, who is off to an insane start, are the scheduled starting pitchers.

DotF: Torres and Ford hit home runs in wins

C Eddy Rodriguez smacked a walk-off grand slam for Triple-A Scranton last night, and the video is embedded above. Walk-off grand slams are pretty damn cool. Here are some notes:

  • C Francisco Diaz was added to the Triple-A Scranton roster and IF Abi Avelino was sent down to Double-A Trenton, according to Shane Hennigan. C Kyle Higashioka is a little banged up. Not bad enough to go on the disabled list, but bad enough to bring in a third catcher for a few days.
  • The Yankees have signed SS Starlin Paulino, reports Matt Eddy. He’s an international free agent who counts against the 2016-17 signing period. I can’t find any information on the kid, but now you know he exists.

Triple-A Scranton (7-2 win over Pawtucket)

  • RF Tyler Wade: 0-3, 1 R, 2 BB, 1 K — first game in right field this year … he’s now played every position this season other than pitcher, catcher, and first base
  • DH Dustin Fowler: 0-4, 1 R, 1 BB, 2 K
  • 2B Rob Refsnyder: 2-3, 1 R, 1 BB, 1 E (throwing)
  • 1B Mike Ford: 2-3, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 HR, 4 RBI, 1 BB, 1 HBP — 5-for-13 (.385) with two doubles and a homer in three games since the promotion
  • CF Mason Williams: 2-4, 1 R, 1 K, 2 SB — 19-for-60 (.317) in his last 14 games
  • LF Mark Payton: 1-3, 1 R, 1 HR, 2 RBI, 1 BB, 1 K, 1 CS — 17-for-45 (.378) in his last 15 games
  • RHP Bryan Mitchell: 3.2 IP, 5 H, 1 R, 1 ER, 1 BB, 3 K, 1 WP, 1 HB, 3/3 GB/FB — 41 of 59 pitches were strikes (69%)
  • LHP Tyler Webb: 3.1 IP, 1 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 1 BB, 6 K, 4/0 GB/FB — 33 of 47 pitches were strikes (70%) … 27 strikeouts and no walks in 19 innings this year

[Read more…]

Game 36: The Unforgiving Schedule Begins

(Brian Blanco/Getty Images North America)
(Brian Blanco/Getty Images North America)

The Yankees next day off is June 5, which means that they are entering a stretch in which they will play twenty games in twenty days. This was bound to happen at some point, given that they have had eight scheduled days off already (that, and the fact that the schedule gods are cruel) – but that doesn’t make it any less forgiving, particularly with the bullpen already being thinned by Aroldis Chapman heading to the disabled list.

Luckily, the first thirteen games of this stretch come against teams with a combined .440 winning percentage, and a run differential of -68. The Royals are first on the docket, and they’ll trot out this lineup against CC Sabathia. The Yankees lineup for this evening is:

  1. Brett Gardner, LF
  2. Gary Sanchez, C
  3. Matt Holliday, DH
  4. Starlin Castro, 2B
  5. Aaron Judge, RF
  6. Jacoby Ellsbury, CF
  7. Chase Headley, 3B
  8. Didi Gregorius, SS
  9. Chris Carter, 1B

The first pitch is scheduled for 8:15 PM EST, and the game will be on both YES and MLB Network.

2017 Draft: Trevor Rogers

Trevor Rogers | LHP

Background
The 19-year-old Rogers attends Carlsbad High School in New Mexico. So far this spring he has a 0.33 ERA with 134 strikeouts and 13 walks in 63.1 innings, and he’s hitting .394/.506/.788 with three homers in 89 plate appearances. It’s worth noting he’s not facing the best competition in southeastern New Mexico, though he has performed well in various summer showcase events. Rogers and former big leaguer Cody Ross are cousins.

Scouting Report
At 6-foot-6 and 185 lbs., Rogers has the big and sturdy frame everyone looks for in a high school pitching prospect. His fastball sits mostly in the 89-92 mph range, though he has run it up as high as 95 mph in short bursts. The pitch also plays up a bit because he has a big stride and long arms, so he releases it closer to the plate than the average pitcher. Rogers has a hard breaking ball that is more of a true slider than a curveball, and when he’s at his best, the pitch is allergic to bats. Like most top high school pitchers, he hasn’t developed much of a changeup because he hasn’t needed it. Rogers is a really good athlete and his arm is loose. There’s not much effort in his delivery at all, though, like most young pitchers this tall, his mechanics can come and go.

Miscellany
The various scouting publications all agree Rogers is a first round talent. Keith Law (subs. req’d) ranks him as the 18th best prospect in the 2017 draft class while MLB.com and Baseball America rank him 23rd and 28th, respectively. The Yankees hold the 16th overall pick. The biggest knock on Rogers is his age. He’s already 19 with an October birthday, making him one of the oldest prep prospects in the draft class. Last year Blake Rutherford slipped in the draft partly because he turned 19 in May, a few weeks before the draft. Rogers will turn 20 this fall. They don’t check IDs on the mound though, and athletic 6-foot-6 lefties with good velocity and a promising breaking ball sure are hard to pass up.

5/16 to 5/18 Series Preview: Kansas City Royals

Vargas. (Brian Davidson/Getty Images North America)
Vargas. (Brian Davidson/Getty Images North America)

The result of the Yankees having so many days off through the first six weeks of the season starts now, as they will not be off again until June 5. That’s twenty games in a row without a day off; luckily, they will not have to travel all that far in that stretch with this week’s trips to Kansas City and Tampa Bay representing the furthest journeys. Given the heavy workload handled by the bullpen this weekend, though, it seems all but certain that the team’s depth and Joe Girardi‘s hand will be tested as soon as this evening.

The Last Time They Met

The Yankees visited Kansas City for a three-game series to close out last August, winning two along the way. They were outscored by one run in the series as a whole, with both of their victories coming by one run, and taking extra innings to sort out. Some other interesting bits:

  • The Royals tested Gary Sanchez‘s arm throughout the series, and largely got the better of him. They stole eight bases, and were caught just twice. Sanchez threw out 10 of 21 would-be base-stealers against teams that weren’t the Royals last year.
  • Chasen Shreve was one of the heroes of the series, which feels strange to see on the screen. He came into the second game with the bases loaded and one out, and struck out Kendrys Morales swinging (on three pitches) before retiring Salvador Perez on a flyball. Shreve chipped in two scoreless innings in the third game, with three more swinging strikeouts (Cheslor Cuthbert, Eric Hosmer, and Perez were the victims this time around).
  • The Yankees game-winning runs were scored on a weak infield single by Jacoby Ellsbury and a sacrifice fly by Brian McCann, respectively.
  • Seven pitchers were used by the Yankees in game two and, in what seems almost impossible, all seven are still in the organization. And of those seven, only Ben Heller is not on the active roster.

Check out Katie’s Yankeemetrics post for more details about this series.

Injury Report

Former Yankee Ian Kennedy is on the disabled list with a hamstring strain, and is scheduled to throw a bullpen session this week. There is no set return date as of yet, but he isn’t expected to be out too long (he could be in-line to face the Yankees when these teams meet again, in fact). Middle reliever Scott Alexander is out, as well.

Their Story So Far

The Royals are last in the majors in runs scored by a comfortable margin, and are scoring just 3.2 runs per game. They are currently 8-18 when they allow two runs or more, and that’s with them having won six of their last seven games overall. It doesn’t help that Alex Gordon and Alcides Escobar both sport an OPS under .500, and it seems less than ideal that one of those two has batted first in 24 of the Royals 37 games (including their last seven). Their lead-off hitters are batting .176/.216/.248 as a group, which is about 72% below league-average.

All that being said, they have shown signs of life of late. They won six of their seven games last week, scoring 37 runs in the process. Eric Hosmer and Salvador Perez have been heating up, and Lorenzo Cain has been playing well all season. The aforementioned duo of Escobar and Gordon went a combined 8-for-48 with one extra-base hit, but every other Royals regular seems to be righting the ship.

The other half of their story mostly revolves around Jason Vargas and his ludicrous 1.01 ERA – I’ll talk about him more a bit later.

The Lineup We Might See

Manager Ned Yost has been semi-responsive to the team’s offensive struggles, with five of the nine spots in the team’s lineup in constant flux. The Royals have used at least seven different players in the 6-through-9 spots (not including pitchers), and four lead-off hitters. That makes predicting their lineup a bit of a crapshoot, so here goes nothing:

  1. Alcides Escobar, SS
  2. Mike Moustakas, 3B
  3. Lorenzo Cain, CF
  4. Eric Hosmer, 1B
  5. Salvador Perez, C
  6. Brandon Moss, DH
  7. Whit Merrifield, 2B
  8. Alex Gordon, LF
  9. Jorge Bonifacio or Jorge Soler, RF

The Starting Pitchers We Will See

Tuesday (8:15 PM EST): LHP CC Sabathia vs. RHP Jason Hammel

There was a stretch in the off-season where everyone was talking about the Cubs unceremoniously declining Hammel’s club option, and then Hammel waiting months upon months to be signed. There were several teams (and fans of teams) that were interested in his services, Yankees included, but he had to wait until February to sign on a dotted line. It was strange to see a pitcher coming off of a three-year stretch of slightly-above-average production on the market for so long, but his 5.97 ERA to-date and approaching 35th birthday make it a bit more understandable with the blessings of hindsight.

Hammel is essentially a two-pitch pitcher, working with a low-90s fastball (though he does use a four- and two-seam varieties) and a mid-80s slider. He’ll use a mid-70s curveball and mid-80s change-up to keep hitters honest, but 85% of his offerings will be a fastball or slider.

Last Outing (vs. TBR on 5/10) – 7 IP, 13 H, 7 R, 1 BB, 6 K

Wednesday (8:15 PM EST): RHP Michael Pineda vs. LHP Jason Vargas

Vargas underwent Tommy John Surgery in the Summer of 2015, and missed the Royals miraculous run to the World Series. He returned for three starts last September, and looked great (12 IP, 8 H, 3 BB, 11 K, 2.25 ERA). Nobody thought much of it, given the sample size and the fact that he was a known commodity, and he was penciled right back into the back of the rotation. He has followed that up by being one of the five-best pitchers in baseball by both incarnations of WAR, and he currently sports a 1.01 ERA (410 ERA+!) through 7 starts (44.2 IP). There are plenty of signs that this is a fluke (2.0% HR/FB, 3.70 xFIP, 88.7 LOB%, etc.), but his 22.9 K% and 4.7 BB% suggest that he could at least be better than most of us would have expected.

The 34-year-old southpaw has never been known for his velocity, but he has slid down into Jamie Moyer territory following the surgery. His fastball is sitting around around 86 MPH, and he throws it about 50% of the time. He also uses a change-up in the upper-70s and a low-70s curveball, the former of which has been his bread and butter throughout his career. His curve is a relatively new addition, and it’s working out quite well for him so far.

Last Outing (vs. TBR on 5/11) – 7 IP, 3 H, 0 R, 1 BB, 4 K

Thursday (8:15 PM EST): LHP Jordan Montgomery vs. LHP Danny Duffy

The 28-year-old Duffy emerged as the Royals ace last season, after finally being moved to the rotation for good on May 15. He made 26 starts through the end of the season, putting together the following line: 161.2 IP, 3.56 ERA, 25.4 K%, 5.6 BB%, 1.13 WHIP. Duffy’s velocity did dip into the 93 MPH range after sitting around 96 in the bullpen, but that’s to be expected. And now, finally (seemingly) freed from bouncing between starting and relieving, he is sitting on a 3.38 ERA (3.32 FIP) through 8 starts.

Duffy uses four pitches on most nights – a low-to-mid 90s four-seamer, a low-90s two-seamer, a low-80s breaking ball that might be best classified as a slurve, and a mid-80s change-up. It’s top-of-the-rotation stuff when he’s getting it over the plate, which he has done fairly regularly over the last calendar year.

Last Outing (vs. BAL on 5/12) – 7 IP, 8 H, 2 R, 1 BB, 6 K

The Bullpen

The Royals bullpen has been kind of bad this season. They were the standard-bearer for great relief corps for several seasons, peaking with a 2.72 ERA in 2015, but closer Kelvin Herrera is the last man standing from those dominant units. And Herrera hasn’t been his dominant self just yet, with a 3.38 ERA (5.20 FIP) and career-low 7.31 K/9. Mike Minor, Joakim Soria, and the injured Scott Alexander all have strong run prevention numbers, but the bullpen as a whole sports a 4.72 ERA and six blown saves. Travis Wood, Matt Strahm, and Peter Moylan have combined to throw 37.1 IP of 8.44 ERA ball, with nearly as many walks (27) as strikeouts (34).

It is worth noting that the Royals bullpen was worked hard this past weekend, especially on Sunday when they were called upon for 5.1 IP. Herrera also pitched in three-straight games, so he may need a bit more than Monday’s day off to recover.

Yankees Connection

Ian Kennedy is the lone Royals players with a connection to the Yankees organization, unless you want to count Jason Hammel and Travis Wood for popping up in rumors this off-season. Also, pitching coach Dave Eiland held the same role with the Yankees from 2008-10.

Who (Or What) To Watch

The Royals swing at more pitches than any other team in the game, with a 49.4% swing rate as per PITCHf/x. They’re second in swinging at pitches outside of the zone, and first on pitches in the zone by nearly two percentage points. Yankees pitchers might be salivating at those numbers, though, as the Royals are in the bottom-ten in contact percentage, and in the middle-of-the-pack in strikeouts and hard-hit balls. They’re an aggressive bunch, which leads to a great deal of feast-or-famine outings.

A ‘buy or sell’ storyline will follow the Royals throughout this season, as well, with Cain, Hosmer, Moustakas, Escobar, and Vargas all being in the final year of their contracts. If the Yankees ends up in a position to buy, this may be one of the first teams they try to match-up with.

An appreciation for the unconventionally successful Tyler Clippard

(Adam Hunger/Getty)
(Adam Hunger/Getty)

Many relievers live off intimidating opposing hitters. Aroldis Chapman comes at you with 100+ mph and a changeup that hits 90. Dellin Betances can touch 100 and has a curveball that can’t be touched when he’s on. Former Yankee Andrew Miller comes at you with his 6-foot-7 frame and tosses his signature slider with a fair dose of imposing fastballs.

Tyler Clippard doesn’t really fit that category. But that hasn’t stopped the Yankees now-setup man from not only carving out a solid career, but continuing to excel at 32.

Thoughts of doom crept in when Clippard was traded to the Yankees at last year’s deadline. A flyball pitcher at Yankee Stadium? A guy seemingly on the downside of his career having a sub-par season? Yikes. The idea that he would replace Miller seemed laughable. For me personally, I had most recently seen Clippard struggle in the 2015 postseason for the Mets, leaving an impression that was at least somewhat misleading.

But his 3+ months back in pinstripes have been fine. Actually, better than fine. He’s thrown 40 2/3 innings over 46 appearances, allowing just nine earned runs while striking out 47 batters. That’s good for a 1.99 ERA and 10.4 K per nine. His ERA had steadily climbed since his 2014 All-Star appearance and he was typically worse in the second half, so his resurgence has been surprising and that much more rewarding and exciting. This is a homegrown talent returning to the Bronx and thriving, even if it’s been less than a full year’s worth of work.

And it doesn’t hurt to have a goofy guy who seems to be genuinely nice getting big outs for you, adding to the overall Clippard experience.

He goes out there with a top-notch changeup and a fastball with some “rising” action, a quality slider and splitter, and all of this plays up in part thanks to his quirky motion. It’s not something to teach your kids, but you can’t say it doesn’t work.

Don’t get me wrong, he can terrify you with some of his appearances. We’re still talking about a flyball pitcher in a park that plays very small. He’s typically off to fast starts (2.50 and 2.14 ERA in first two months, respectively for his career) before the summer air aids a few more flyballs in their pursuit of becoming home runs in June and July. His 2016 return was all rosy in August until hiccups came in September.

We were indoctrinated early in 2017 about his potential pitfalls when he earned a loss against the Orioles with a two-run homer allowed to Seth Smith. And don’t act like you weren’t biting your nails on the edge of your seat during his save against the Cardinals. Perhaps the best example of how the Clippard experience can frustrate is the Adam Jones catch from March’s World Baseball Classic. Clippard’s “Oh my” reaction was all of us in that moment.

But he also turns it on at times. He changed the complexion of the 18-inning win vs. the Cubs, ending the 9th inning rally before striking out the side in the 10th. Watch the video below: He utilizes his entire arsenal to create three punchouts.

Compared to most team’s “7th inning guy”, Clippard is light years ahead. Some teams would even kill for him to be their setup man.

Which, coincidentally, is where he’ll be for the next month, taking the 8th with Betances closing. We were spoiled last year with No Runs DMC. Miller is gone and Chapman is hurt, although the Yankees hope he’ll be back in a month or so. However, Clippard is adept. He’s certainly a non-traditional back-end reliever with below-average velocity, but he’s out here with career-best strikeout and walk rates in 2017.

The Tyler Clippard renaissance will only last so long. He has a .161 BABIP and a 98 percent strand rate. His home runs per fly ball are actually up vs. last season, but his 1.17 ERA isn’t going to hold and it would be foolish to expect it. He’s going to blow at least a game or two, but, then again, so does every reliever.

But Clippard is a pitcher worth enjoying for what he is. Clippard is an above-average reliever who won’t overpower or intimidate, but he’s beat expectations and he’s doing it in a Yankees uniform, coming full circle. If that’s not something to sit back and appreciate, then I don’t know what is. I suggest enjoying the ride.