Boone Logan will have elbow surgery on Thursday

Via Mark Feinsand: Left-hander Boone Logan will have surgery to remove a bone spur from his elbow this Thursday. He is due to become a free agent this offseason and is expected to be ready in time for Spring Training. We first heard he needed the procedure about two weeks ago.

Logan, 29, pitched to 3.23 ERA (3.81 FIP) in 39 innings across 61 appearances this year while holding left-handers to a .215/.274/.377 (.281 wOBA) line with a 40.0% strikeout rate. It’s unclear if the surgery will affect how teams value him this winter — tests confirmed the ligament is fine — but the going rate for top lefty relievers is in the three-year, $12M range. We haven’t heard anything about whether the Yankees will try to retain Logan, who has been their best lefty reliever since Mike Stanton.

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Logan open to returning to Yankees next season

Via Dan Barbarisi: Left-hander Boone Logan said he is open to returning to the Yankees next season. He’ll become a free agent for the first time this winter. “I look at it like this: When I started pitching good, I was with the Yankees,” he said. “It’s something I’m going to look a lot more into, and give it more thought, but I will say this: Why fix something that isn’t broke? That’s something I’ve got to talk to myself about. That time will come. But why wouldn’t you want to play for the Yankees, if you can?”

Logan, 29, has a 3.38 ERA (3.64 FIP) with a dynamite strikeout rate (10.30 K/9 and 26.8 K%) in 175.2 innings since coming to New York prior to the 2010 season. He’s held same-side hitters to a .292 wOBA with a 32.6% strikeout rate in pinstripes. Logan has been the team’s best left-handed reliever since Mike Stanton was in his heyday and it’s not all that close either. That said, I’m concerned about his recent workload — his 204 appearances since 2011 are the 12th most in baseball — and the fact that he admitted his elbow has been barking since Spring Training. He’ll need surgery to clean out a bone spur after the season.

The going rate for quality lefty relievers these days is something like three years and $12M (Damaso Marte!). Scott Downs got a little more (three years, $15M), Sean Burnett a little less (two years, $8M). Logan has a lot going for him in that he’s relatively young, offers premium power stuff, and has shown he can do it in a small ballpark for a perennial contender. As good as he’s been, there is a definite case to be made that letting him walk is the right move for the Yankees, especially given the elbow stuff. A $4-5M lefty reliever doesn’t fit well under the $189M luxury tax given the team’s other commitments either.

Boone Logan has bone spur in elbow, needs offseason surgery

After visiting with Dr. James Andrews in Florida, Boone Logan has been diagnosed with a bone spur in the back of his elbow. The ligaments are intact. Logan will need surgery in the offseason and is expected to be ready in time for Opening Day. He played long-toss today and hopes to return to the team later this week. Until then, Cesar Cabral will be Joe Girardi‘s go-to matchup lefty.

Logan to have elbow examined by Dr. Andrews

Boone Logan is flying to Florida to have his left elbow examined by Dr. James Andrews. That’s bad. The elbow has been barking for about a week now and he reportedly tried to play catch this weekend. The injury comes at a bad time for both the Yankees, who are without their top lefty reliever, and Logan himself — he’s due to become a free agent after the season. Cesar Cabral is getting a trial by fire as Joe Girardi‘s top matchup lefty in the meantime.

Update: MRI reveals inflammation in Logan’s left arm

7:30pm: Logan received a cortisone shot yesterday and hopes to be available by Friday. Like I said, Cabral’s going to get a few chances to show what he can do.

11:00am: Yesterday’s MRI revealed inflammation in Boone Logan‘s left arm, but not in his elbow. He left Friday’s game with tightness in his biceps, near his elbow. “He’ll probably be on that three days off (plan) and we’ll go from there,” said Joe Girardi. This is your chance to shine, Cesar Cabral.

Update: Boone Logan leaves game with biceps issue

11:18pm: Logan complained of soreness in his biceps and will head for an MRI tomorrow. He first felt it a few pitches before leaving the game.

9:54pm: Boone Logan was taken out of tonight’s game with an unknown injury after a hard-hit single back up the middle. Replays showed the ball didn’t hit him on the way by, but he might have hurt something trying to get out of the way. Very weird. Stay tuned for updates.

2013 Midseason Review: Grade B’s

No, it’s not the literal midway point of the season, but we’re going to use the four-day All-Star break to review the Yankees’ performance to date. We’re handing out letter grades this year, A through F. Yesterday we tackled the A’s, today we continue with the B’s.

(Al Bello/Getty)
(Al Bello/Getty)

The Yankees remain just three games out of a playoff spot despite their plethora of injuries, and the reason they remain so relatively close is a number of unexpectedly strong performances. Some new faces — I mean really new faces, as in guys acquired during Spring Training — have stepped up and assumed larger than expected roles, taking pressure off stalwarts like Robinson Cano in the lineup and David Robertson in the bullpen.

The Grade B’s are not the team’s elite players. They are the guys who have performed well, better than average really, and served as consistent complimentary pieces. One of these guys is actually a disappointment relative to his typical production, but his standard is so high that a disappointing year is actually pretty good. Without further ado, here are the Grade B’s.

Brett Gardner
Outside of Cano, Gardner has been the team’s only other consistently above-average offensive player. He missed basically all of last season with an elbow injury and has emerged as a legitimate leadoff hitter, putting up a .272/.338/422 (107 wRC+) line with a career-high tying seven homers. Gardner has only stolen 13 bases (in 19 attempts), which is surprising and a letdown, but he has made up for the lack of speed by hitting for power. He has also continued to play his typically elite defense while replacing Curtis Granderson in center field — Gardner was slated to play center even before Granderson’s injury. He can be streaky, but Gardner has been very good for the Yankees this year.

Shawn Kelley
Acquired from the Mariners early in Spring Training, Kelley shook off a horrid April to emerge as Joe Girardi‘s trusted seventh inning guy. His 3.67 ERA and 3.12 FIP are built on a dynamite strikeout rate (13.37 K/9 and 36.2 K%), which has allowed him to strand 21 of 22 inherited runners. Kelley has essentially been a second Robertson with the way he can come out of the bullpen and snuff out rallies without the ball being put in play. What looked like a depth pickup in camp has turned into something much more. Kelley is a key part of the bullpen.

Boone Logan
The theme of New York’s bullpen is strikeouts, and none of their relievers — not even Mariano Rivera — can match Logan’s ability to miss bats (12.60 K/9 and 34.7 K%) and limit walks (1.80 BB/9 and 5.0 BB%). His 7.00 K/BB is the eighth best in baseball among relievers who have thrown at least 20 innings. Logan has excellent strikeout (42.4%) and walk (3.4%) rates against lefties, but he’s run into a little bad luck (.429 BABIP) and they’ve put up a decent .246/.271/.404 line against him. That’s not good for a primary lefty specialist, but it has improved of late and Logan remains an effective cog in Girardi’s bullpen. He’s been the team’s best left-handed reliever since Mike Stanton way back in the day and it’s not all that close either.

(AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
(AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)

Lyle Overbay
The Yankees signed Overbay with just three days left in camp and he was only supposed to hang around until Mark Teixeira returned, but Teixeira’s season-ending wrist surgery has made him the everyday first baseman. Overbay has responded by hitting an ever-so-slightly above-average .252/.308/.437 (101 wRC+) with more than a few clutch, late-inning hits, plus he plays very good defense at first. He’s a platoon bat — 121 wRC+ vs. RHP but only 46 vs. LHP — but the Yankees have had to play him everyday, so the fact that his overall season line is a bit better than average is a testament to how productive he’s been against righties. Overbay has exceeded even the highest of expectations and has probably been the team’s third best everyday position player. No, really.

CC Sabathia
Sunday’s disaster start makes this seem silly, but even the diminished version of CC Sabathia is a reliable innings eating workhorse. As I’ve been saying the last five years now, even bad Sabathia is still pretty good. He’s got a 4.07 ERA and 4.05 FIP in 137 innings, the fifth most in all of baseball. His biggest problem this season has been the long ball — CC has already surrendered 21 homers, just one fewer than his career-high set last year. Learning to live with reduced fastball velocity is not an easy thing to do, but Sabathia has worked through it and typically gives the team a chance to win. Well, at least gives a team with an average offense to win. He’s not an ace right now and he may never be again, but the sheer volume of innings he provides makes him a better than average hurler despite the an ERA and FIP that are worse than his career norms.