Steinbrenner, Torre, and Martin on Hall of Fame’s Expansion Era ballot

George Steinbrenner, Joe Torre, and Billy Martin are part of the 12-man Hall of Fame ballot to be voted on by the 16-member Expansion Era Veterans Committee next month. Marvin Miller and former Yankee Tommy John are also on the ballot, which you can see right here. Twelve votes are required for induction. Electees will be announced on December 9th, the first day of the Winter Meetings in Orlando. The Boss should be a lock, but who really knows with this stuff.

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A non-inclusive list of things George Steinbrenner hasn’t done since 2010

Ghost Boss.
Ghost Boss.

When the Yanks completed their series to forget against the Mets last night, I knew someone would write it, and of course, Ian O’Connor drew the short straw. Keep in mind that George Steinbrenner had not been well for some time and passed away at the age of 80 in 2010. Allow me then to present a non-inclusive list of things the Boss would have done if he were still alive.

If the Boss were alive…

Perhaps it’s time to put this tired trope to bed.

On realistic expectations

There was a time, in the not-so-distant past, that George Steinbrenner would have been furiously scrutinizing the Yankees organization had they been eliminated from the postseason in the ALDS round. His wrath would have probably begun by challenging the players’ performance (not to mention, their resolve), and ultimately wound its way through each level of management. After a few tension filled weeks of wondering who the latest casualty of the proverbial chopping block would be, decisions would be made and life in Yankeeland would continue.

After all, winning championships was second only to breathing in Steinbrenner’s book. Consequently, ever since Steinbrenner took charge, New York has experienced a culture shift like no other franchise had before (in my opinion). Winning became valued above all else; so much so, that anything short of a championship was deemed a failure — a failure deserving of immediate recourse. Of course, this model appealed to a large population of fans who sought immediate compensation every time they experienced “disappointment” (despite the fact that the Yankees enjoyed far more overall success than many other organizations).  Obviously, it frustrated many fans as well as organizational moves weren’t always well thought out.

Unfortunately, this mentality revolves around extremely lofty expectations that are nearly impossible to fulfill (which makes the Yankee dynasty years all the more incredible). It has also led to a lot of very shortsighted, reactionary decisions over the years. My generally-very-level-headed-colleagues were petitioning, on Friday, for the immediate removal of Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, and Nick Swisher (because that’s simple!) since they “sucked and weren’t clutch.” Despite the fact that the pitching staff did a largely brilliant job, Girardi received more than his fair share of criticism as well.  How dare he pull Ivan Nova?  How dare Nova not show more grit and deal with a little arm discomfort?  It wasn’t just the knuckleheads at work though; a not-so-rational Twitterland was in full freak out mode the day after the Bombers stranded eleven on base and lost the game.

While Hal Steinbrenner’s recent comments weren’t quite as provocative as his father’s undoubtedly would have been back in the day, they still managed to reinforce the “win all or bust” mantra. Steinbrenner remarked, “I personally share in our fans’ disappointment that this season has ended without a championship. That is, and always will be, our singular goal every season. I assure you that this disappointment will strengthen our resolve to field a team in 2012 that can bring a twenty-eighth championship to the Bronx. That work starts now.”

Personally, I see this type of passion as something of a double-edged sword. Sure, as fans, we invest ourselves whole-heartedly. We love our team. We bleed pinstripes. When they win, we win. When they lose, we lose. Or, at least, that’s how it feels to us. It’s also great that the team constantly strives for success and is willing to improve each offseason; I think that’s what all successful organizations should do.  Perhaps, though, we may want to consider another shift in culture though. Maybe if we can shift our expectations slightly, we can once again appreciate how much effort it takes to simply have the opportunity to win a championship year in and year out. World Series are the ultimate thrill, but making the playoffs and witnessing a representative effort is still pretty exciting too.

The Boss Files: George Steinbrenner, FBI informant

Updated (Tuesday, 12:51 a.m.): In order to gain a pardon for his 1974 conviction stemming from illegal political campaign contributions, George Steinbrenner helped the FBI on “certain highly confidential national security and criminal justice matters” throughout the 1970s and 1980s, documents released today show. As the Wall Street Journal and Associated Press reported, the documents were released in response to a FOIA request at the time of Steinbrenner’s death, and they highlight how Steinbrenner worked with the Bureau and NYPD over the span of 11 years to help clear his reputation. Anyone interested can read them all right here.

One of the more intriguing files released was a memo from a discussion Steinbrenner had with the FBI about his conviction. Steinbrenner in the late 1970s, blamed his lawyers for “advising him to make the illegal campaign contributions.” He thus tried to secure the pardon for business purposes. He wrote in a letter that his felony record “has adversely affected my business and professional activities [and] limited my participation in civic, charitable and community affairs. A pardon would, I believe, substantially reduce or eliminate that effect and would permit me to contribute more of my services to my community.” The Yankees had no comment on the documents.

Photo of the Day: The Boss, in bronze

(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

The Boss has been memorialized in bronze. As Neil Johnson of The Tampa Tribune reported this morning, a life-sized statue of George Steinbrenner now stands at the entrance of the stadium that bears his name at the team’s Spring Training complex down in Tampa. A formal dedication ceremony will take place on the morning of February 26 before the Yanks’ Grapefruit League home opener.

Standing on a three-ton polished granite base, the 600-pound bronze version of the Boss is wearing a suit and a 2009 World Championship ring, the last title the team won under his watch. Yankee Stadium plays host to a statue of George already, but he did a ton for the Tampa community. It’s only right for him to honored in his home town.