Will it ever end with Farnsworth?

It’s one thing to not be pitching well. Take Scott Proctor for example. He’s not finding the same kind of success he had last year, but he places the blame on himself (or his equipment, but a baseball player should be one with his equipment, and I’ll cut the faux philosophical baloney for now). Many people don’t want to see Proctor pitching right now, but fewer are calling for his immediate departure. That’s because the dude doesn’t bitch and whine.

Kyle Farnsworth, though, is not nearly as affable. He has been disastrous all year, and instead of taking the blame himself (which he apparently does when his PR guy tells him to), he blames external factors. From Pete Abraham’s blog

“I don’t like [not pitching regularly] at all,” he said. “I didn’t come here to sit on the bench. That definitely doesn’t help.”

Well soooorrrry, Kyle, but you kind of have to earn playing time. It would be one thing to complain if he was rotting in the bullpen like Ron Villone was for the first few months of last season. But Farnsworth gets chance after chance, yet continues to fail. Hell, his manager even went out of his way to say he hasn’t seen any inconsistency from him, when any dunderhead with 20/40 vision could tell you otherwise.

The worst thing you can do to lead off the 8th inning is to walk a backup catcher with an OPS+ of 54. Likewise, the worst thing you can do after pitching poorly is to complain about your usage patterns. This isn’t to say we approve of Joe Torre’s bullpen usage; that’s an issue I’m just not prepared to address right now, because it’s reaching term paper level. There is, however, one golden rule of the Torre pen:

If you walk dudes, you’re going to sit for prolonged periods of time.

Of course, the more money you make the longer it takes for you to find a seat on the bench. But eventually you’re going to find your way there. The move for Farnsworth was long overdue, and that’s obvious to even the most staunch Kyle supporter — if there are any.

Our next game is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday; the trade deadline is at 4. Anyone think that Krazy Kyle will be sitting next to Mariano at that point?

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Tigers looking to acquire Farnsworth

Why they would want to do this I don’t know. It comes from our pal George King, though, so take it as you will.

I want to dish Farns as much as the next guy, but I wouldn’t advocate doing it to Detroit unless we get some serious bounty. And why would Detroit give up anything significant for an overpaid, underperforming reliever?

This is the move that has the chance to bite you in the ass as early as this year. Unless we’re talking Ian Kennedy and Kyle Farnsworth for Andrew Miller (and Dave Dombrowski isn’t that dumb), stay away from this one.

The impending end of Kyle Farnsworth?

The Yanks, yesterday, inked discarded reliever Scott Williamson to a Minor League contract. Williamson, formerly with the Orioles, was hurt for much of the season. In just 14.1 appearances spanning 16 games, he had allowed 12 hits while striking out 16 and walking 8. His ERA on the season stands at 4.40. I have to wonder if this deal is another sign that Kyle Farnsworth’s time on the Yanks is limited. The Yanks have demoted him, thanksfully, from the 8th inning role and have numerous arms to replace his in the pen.

The Kyle Konundrum

What good is a win without a little controversy? After a long wait — seven days, to be exact — the Yanks finally won a game as they, powered by three A-Rod hits, narrowly beat the A’s 2-1.

Mike Mussina pitched 7 strong innings against a team struggling as much as the Yanks were, and Mariano Rivera closed out the final 1.1 innings with 3 K’s to nail down his 10th save of the year. But what happened in between Moose’s departure and Rivera’s arrival was the story of the game.

To start the 8th inning, Joe Torre went with his typical game plan. Now, keep in mind that this game plan has worked approximately three times this year. That’s right; just three times this season, Farnsworth has worked 1-2-3 innings. As you can guess, tonight was not one of them.

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Farnsworth’s role, defined

While chatting on the Banter last night during the heart attack-inducing end of the game, I noticed a fellow commenter state that Kyle Farnsworth should be the David Ortiz specialist. The numbers, albeit in limited plate appearances, bear out that statement. Farnsworth has faced Ortiz 9 times. Ortiz is 0 for 6 with 4 Ks and 3 BBs. When you compare those numbers to Ortiz’s .313/.333/.563 line in 17 plate appearances against lefty specialist Mike Myers, it’s clear who should be pitching to Ortiz with the game on the line.