Jun
30

M’s rough up Hughes, Yanks drop opener 7-4

By

Fresh of their dramatic come-from-behind win against the Dodgers on Sunday, the Yankees returned home Tuesday with a tough assignment on their hands in Cliff Lee. The Mariners’ offense is dreadfully bad, but you wouldn’t have been able to tell that by the picket fence they built on a well-rested Phil Hughes. Unsurprisingly Lee was too much to handle, and the Yanks suffered just their fourth loss of the month in a game not started by A.J. Burnett. Boston defeated the Rays, so they now lurk just one game back in the AL East.

"Oh hey, congrats on the two doubles." (Photo Credit: Seth Wenig, AP)

Too Much Cliff Lee

I don’t think many of us expected the Yanks the light up the scoreboard in this one, though I have to say that they made a surprising amount of hard contact of Lee. They had five balls lined right at people for outs, and of course Nick Swisher clubbed a pair of solo homers. But in the end, Lee was just too much for the Yankee batters. He threw 79 of his 115 pitches for strikes in his third straight complete game, retiring 12 of 13 from the 5th through 8th innings. You wouldn’t know it based on the relatively low number of swings-and-misses he generated (just four), but Lee kept the Yanks’ hitters off balance all night.

If you need to know the biggest out of the game, it was Chad Huffman’s double play ball in the 2nd inning. Score was tied at one, Yanks had runners at first and second with one out and a legit chance to hang some runs on Lee. Instead, we got a 5-4-3 double play and the end of the inning. Joe and I were talking the other night about how there has been a little too much tipping of the cap to the other pitcher this year, but tonight Lee deserves it. He beat the Yankees fair and square.

Fastballs & Cutters

Photo Credit: Seth Wenig, AP

I’m not going to get on Phil Hughes too much because this was his first start in ten days, but good grief, again with the 85% fastballs and cutters. It’s been 15 starts now, and it’s pretty obvious the league is catching on. When Rob Johnson, Rob frickin’ Johnson and his .274 wOBA whacks a pair of doubles off you, you don’t tip your cap to him. You say “what the hell did I do wrong?” and stop doing it. The guy saw 11 pitches in three at-bats against Hughes, and ten of them were fastballs. I mean, what more do you need? Was the Kevin Cash homer a few weeks ago not enough?

Yes, it was good to see Hughes get two swings-and-misses on changeups (both to Russell Branyan in separate at-bats), but so what. Until he starts mixing that pitch, or at least his curveball in more, he’ll keep getting hit around. Major league hitters will hit a fastball when they know it’s coming, and 85% of the time Hughes is giving it to them.

Miscellany

"Oh hi honey, yeah the game's going greTHWACK!!!"

The best part of the game? Watching the guy on his cellphone get hit square in the face with the ball on Johnson’s 5th inning ground rule double (above). You can’t not laugh at that. Make sure you click the image for a larger view.

I didn’t list it above like we usually do, but if you must know what the most damaging hit of the night was, it was Franklin Gutierrez’s solo homer with two outs in the 4th to stretch the Mariners’ lead to two.

"How YOU doin'?" (Photo Credit: Seth Wenig, AP)

Hooray for Curtis Granderson picking up two hits and a line drive out off Lee. Any time he does something productive against a lefty, especially a tough lefty, I plan on mentioning it in the recap. He’s reached base nine times in the last six games.

I really hope Joe Girardi‘s plan isn’t to play Jorge Posada the majority of the time at DH with Frankie Cervelli behind the plate going forward. Cervelli’s hitting .200/.288/.253 dating back to May 18th, and that doesn’t include Tuesday’s 0-for-3 effort. His defense really hasn’t been all that great either. I’d rather let CC Sabathia DH every day.

Chan Ho Park goes out and throws two perfect innings against the worst offense in the league, so naturally Girardi will run him out there for multiple innings in a similar situation in the future and get burned by it. So predictable.

And seriously, how big of a hypocrite is Joe West? Calls the Yankees and Red Sox “pathetic and embarrassing” because their games last so long, yet it takes the guy five seconds to signal balls and strikes behind the plate. What a joke.

WPA Graph & Box Score

At least The O’Neill Theory is in effect for tomorrow. Here’s the box score, here’s the nerd score.

Up Next

Things don’t get any easier for the Yanks tomorrow evening with Felix Hernandez taking the ball for Seattle. Javy Vazquez will oppose him and try to even this series up at one.

Categories : Game Stories
  • Carlosologoist in Humid Ass Colombia

    It´s baby steps with Granderson and LHP.

  • http://www.soxandpinstripes.net JGS

    Bah–this one is on Hughes. Gotta step on them when you get a lead against a guy like Lee.

    Nick Swisher is awesome, and I am a big fan of the whole “6 runs in the last two ninth innings” thing, but it would be really nice to get some more runs before we have a 2% chance of winning.

  • Carlosologoist in Humid Ass Colombia

    On Facebook, everybody is panicking. They think the season is lost and Cashman is an idiot. But the Yanks, as of June 30, are still in first place and lead the division by two games.

    • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com/ bexarama

      Y-you mean Hughes isn’t RUINED 4EVA?????

      • Carlosologoist in Humid Ass Colombia

        WE SHOULD TRADE AJ FOR LEE ASAP!!!1

        That was an actual comment on Facebook. No joke.

        • http://twitter.com/dpatrickg Dirty Pena

          Including the “1″? That would be AWESOME.

  • Mike HC

    Hughes has gotten by with the 4 seamer and cutter and dominated up to this point. I agreed that you wait for the league to make the adjustment to you, and see if they can, before you start to tinker with a good thing. But the league has caught up. Time to work on an off speed pitch. Curve or change. And you gotta use it consistently.

    Two, Hughes did not look sharp, and that could have been expected with ten days rest. I hope the Yanks don’t completely mess with Hughes like they did Joba last year. The Yanks idea of developing young pitchers seems to be “completely throw them off their timing and mess with their routine at one of the most crucial times in a players development and learning process (when the league has made their initial adjustments and you gotta figure out how to counteract that).

    • http://twitter.com/dpatrickg Dirty Pena

      I generally agree with you here; I don’t share your concern about Hughes though. I don’t think they are gonna fuck with him TOO bad. No way will they do the abbreviated starts thing again and skipping a start here or there isn’t the end of the world. FWIW, LoHud says Hughes supports the innings limit. I really doubt it’s gonna be an issue- everyone’s just terrified because of Joba.

      • Mike HC

        Yea. I agree that skipping one start is not a big deal. But you are right. The way the Yanks treated Joba is forever burned into my brain. Hopefully Hughes finishes out the year strong and the Yanks can put all the “they can’t develop young starters” criticism behind them.

        I would be lying if I said I was not just a little worried though.

  • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

    I really hope Joe Girardi’s plan isn’t to play Jorge Posada the majority of the time at DH with Frankie Cervelli behind the plate going forward. Cervelli’s hitting .200/.288/.253 dating back to May 18th, and that doesn’t include Tuesday’s 0-for-3 effort. His defense really hasn’t been all that great either. I’d rather let CC Sabathia DH every day.

    Meh, as long as our DH options remain of the Peña/Russo/Curtis/Huffman variety, I absofrickinlutely hope that Joe Girardi’s plan is to DH Posada all the time and play Cervelli at C all the time.

    No matter which way you slice it, on this current 25 man active roster you’re going to have a subpar bat in the lineup every day until one of Thames/Miranda/Johnson returns from the DL or we swing a trade for a Keppinger/DeJesus/Guillen/etc. If that #9 hitter is going to be a bad bat, it might as well be Cervelli providing plus defense behind the dish and keeping Jorge’s legs fresh.

    • http://twitter.com/dpatrickg Dirty Pena

      I am vigorously anti-”Posada as DH” yet sadly I agree with this.

    • Mike HC

      Yea, Girardi does not have much of a choice with the current roster.

      Sadly, CC as the DH, while it is unrealistic that it would ever happen for multiple reasons, may actually be our best lineup right now, no joke.

      • http://www.soxandpinstripes.net JGS

        CC Sabathia is a career .258/.265/.381/.647 hitter in 101 PAs. That’s three home runs, three doubles, a bunch of singles, one walk, and a 70 OPS+. It’s pretty good for a pitcher, but CC is not a better hitter than Cervelli.

        • Mike HC

          but its damn close if the .200 hitter we see now is his true ability.

    • BigBlueAL

      This.

    • Salty Buggah

      Agreed. Only thing we can do right now is hope that Cervelli starts getting those dinky/bloopy hits again until we find another viable option at DH.

    • Chris

      We’re gonna have to deal with it for the time being. Posada is obviously a worse catcher than Cervelli and honestly he kills us behind the plate. The pitchers ERA is higher with Posada than Cervelli and Cervelli is a much better blocker. Nick Johnson doesn’t return for a while so we need to stick with what we got to keep the pitching ERA down. Clearly Cervelli behind the plate is getting the job done, the yankees starters team ERA is second in the AL. Ill take it

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        The pitchers ERA is higher with Posada than Cervelli… we need to stick with what we got to keep the pitching ERA down. Clearly Cervelli behind the plate is getting the job done, the yankees starters team ERA is second in the AL. Ill take it.

        http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/correlation.png

        • Rose

          Correlation does not equal causation, it is only a requirement for it – Edward Tufte

      • Salty Buggah

        Eh, Idk. To me, Cervelli hasn’t exactly done that well of a job there. His CS% is pretty terrible. He’s not really blocking everything like you said. Maybe it’s because I tend to focus mostly on AJ’s starts & compare both Posada and Cervelli, but Cervelli is (seemingly) allowing the same pitches to get past him. My memory could be and probably is distorting the facts but Cervelli hasn’t looked good at all behind plate lately.

        I think his defense will be better now, as he will get much more rest, but his offense will stay at current levels.

        • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

          His CS% is pretty terrible.

          Well, that’s not all his fault. No Yankee pitcher is even remotely good at holding runners on.

          • Ross in Jersey

            Andy Pettitte would like a word with you.

            • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

              Andy Pettitte has a good pickoff move, but when he goes to the plate, he’s slow as shit.

              • Ross in Jersey

                Well, yes, if a guy goes on first move on Andy he’s either going to get picked off or steal the base easily. Still, I’d say that’s doing a pretty good job of holding the runner.

        • abbey

          Cervelli definitely a better defensive catcher. Do you prefer a less defensive catcher behind the plate??
          Posada as DH(a significant amount of time) is a better combination for the team
          I agree Cervelli has not been as sharp as he usually is over the last few weeks, however with his abilities,I believe it will correct itself. One thing I know, he calls a great game and the pitching staff loves him.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUvg7Empjfg Captain Jack

      or we swing a trade for a Keppinger/DeJesus/Guillen/etc.

      There’s more attractive options than this too. Jhonny Peralta, Alex Gordon, or a Jorge Cantu of the INF variety, all really should be traded. While, yes, the Royals should keep Alex Gordon, you don’t become the worst organization in baseball making good moves. I’d also like for the team to take a long hard look at players like: Marlon Byrd, Austin Kearns, and Cody Ross. Bottom line…the Yankees need to acquire a guy who be a legitimate DH.

      • Ross

        I saw last night the Rays just released Hank Blalock, and although he didn’t do much in the majors I’d be willing to give him a shot at DH than keep seeing Cervelli kill rallies in the 8 hole. He wouldn’t cost anything so there’s no risk as far as I’m concerned. The dude mashed at AAA to the point where the Rays released Pat the Bat to bring him up, so the ability is there.

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

          It’s true there’s no risk… there’s also no reward.

          Over 2009-2010, his last 564 PA, he’s hitting .236/.282/.446 (86+). Frankly, Frankie Cervelli can give us a .282 OBP. Pass.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUvg7Empjfg Captain Jack

      I also want to look at Coco Crisp, at least from watching him he seems to be a more than competent defender and has a career .758 OPS against lefties, nothing to write home about but it’s an improvement over Granderson and Gardner. He’s coming off an injury not likely to net the As picks in next year’s draft, he’s making too much money for the As, so he should come at a small cost.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        If we’re adding a position player, I’m much more interested in adding an infielder rather than an outfielder. (Yes, I know I listed DeJesus and Guillen, but only because they’ve been linked to the Yankees. I much prefer Keppinger.)

        Our outfield is all young and not in need of frequent rest (and one of the three DH bats we have returning plays the OF in Thames; our third baseman has had hip problems the past two years. I want someone who can play 3B. Most of the guys who can play 3B can play the corner OF spots anyway.

        So:
        Byrd, Kearns, Ross, Crisp, DeJesus, Guillen: NO
        Keppinger, Peralta, Gordon, Cantu: YES

        I’d also consider:
        Jayson Nix, Alberto Callaspo, Mike Fontenot, Cristian Guzman, Wes Helms, and… wait for it… Wilson Betemit.

        • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUvg7Empjfg Captain Jack

          Well I don’t want to add an outfielder for the sake of adding an outfielder, but if they’re looking to add a DH type player…well the outfielders are better hitters than the infielders. Ideally I’d like to add Gordon and someone else like a Cody Ross or a David DeJesus, someone that can give the team the “A” lineup so to speak.

  • Mike HC

    Hopefully Javy will teach Hughes a thing or two about mixing your pitches and changing speeds tom.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUvg7Empjfg Captain Jack

    I think the lesson of tonight’s game is that Phil Hughes should have been traded for Cliff Lee last night. I really can’t see anything else that can be taken away from the loss.

    Also on the subject of Cliff Lee, Arodys Vizcaino was better than the entire package the Phillies got for Cliff Lee. Ruben Amaro: Stubborn Prick.

  • Rose

    “Oh hi honey, yeah the game’s going greTHWACK!!!”

    hahaha so good

  • Rose

    Is it just a coincidence that Hughes pitches his worst (by far) after his first outing after having 9 days rest?

    Answer: Probably not.

    • Pete

      should this game mean that the yankees shouldn’t employ an innings limit on Phil Hughes?

      no

      • Rose

        I think you are susceptible to injuries with innings limits just as much (if not more, who knows?) as you are to them without them.

        I think it all evens out. You’re not going to throw 7 inning shut outs every outing. You’re going to throw a few bad ones or get up in your pitch count and be taken out accordingly anyway. Skipping starts, giving extra days rest, messing around with a groove in order to prevent something you aren’t 100% sure on doesn’t make sense to me.

        Every player is different. The mechanics are different. We’re all about correlation does not imply causation…but this is direct link to that. Some guys can throw hard and stay healthy…other guys can throw hard and can’t. Does this mean you can throw 20 innings one year and immediately throw 200 innings the next? Absolutely not…but I don’t think it should be as ridiculous as it’s made out to be. But this is merely my opinion (and several others as well, including John Smoltz). I think some things are necessary…but not as strict and arbitrary as they are currently.

        • Ross in Jersey

          It’s about the economics of it more than anything, I think. The arms of these pitchers are worth millions to the Yankees. Hughes, if he continues to mature and turns into the elite pitcher we all see him as, is worth even more. I’m sure Brian Cashman, more than anyone, has nightmares about Phil or CC or any of his pitchers blowing their arm out. So, if he can do something, even as superficial as shaving 20-30 innings off Phil’s workload this year, he’s going to do it.

          Remember CC’s no hitter that got broken up against the Rays earlier this year? Did anyone doubt that CC could throw 170 pitches without breaking a sweat? But Joe was gonna pull him anyway, because CC’s arm is worth literally tens of millions of dollars. You just don’t mess around when you’re dealing with (already paid for) property that’s worth that much.

          • Rose

            And I agree with that. I agree with the pitch count (although I think you could go even further and evaluate the pitches thrown, etc. but that would be crazy).

            Innings are so arbitrary I just don’t think it’s good for them. For all they know disrupting a young pitcher’s routine could not only cause problems with his mechanics but also be just as damaging. To be honest, that makes a lot more sense to me actually than arbitrary innings riddled with all different pitch counts and pitches thrown. But that’s me.

            • Ross in Jersey

              I agree, but at least with pitch counts there are the oft-recited examples of young pitchers who blew their arms out. So far, none of the “innings count” guys have suffered career-ending arm injuries. Until front offices see evidence to the contrary, innings counts will be the way to go, especially as the costs of good starting pitching talent continue to rise.

              • Rose

                Innings limits is fairly new. You can’t tell if there’s going to be another Kerry Wood or Mark Prior just yet. They keep trying to come back still. The same could be said for some of these young guys in a few years you never know.

        • Rose

          Does this mean you can throw 20 innings one year and immediately throw 200 innings the next? Absolutely not…but I don’t think it should be as ridiculous as it’s made out to be.

          Although Halladay threw 105.1 IP in 2001 at 24 and 239.1 IP in 2002, Mussina threw 87.2 IP in 1991 at age 22 then 241 IP in 1992, and Pedro Martinez threw 107 IP in 1993 at age 21 and 144.2 IP in 1994 and 194.2 IP in 1995. Just to name a few…

          • http://riveraveblues.com Mike Axisa

            We could play this game all day and not prove anything. Are you willing to gamble that Hughes can handle the workload like Moose did at risk of him turning into Kerry Wood?

            • Rose

              Well who’s to say Kerry Wood’s injuries were directly linked to his mismanaged innings? I mean Zumaya can’t throw more than 38 innings a year…and it’s not because of the innings he pitched the year before.

              You’re right, you can go back and forth forever…I’m just saying that for every guy that had a jump in innings and (maybe coincidentally?) got injured the next year – you can find another where they were completely fine. Every pitcher is so different…treating them like they’re all the same just doesn’t make sense to me. But how do you know what the pitcher is like in that sense? That’s the real problem there.

              • http://www.riveraveblues.com Joseph Pawlikowski

                Every pitcher is so different…treating them like they’re all the same just doesn’t make sense to me

                I’d agree with you if we had any way of knowing what each pitcher can handle. but we don’t, and since it’s in the team’s best interest to take the cautious path, I full agree with controlling innings.

                • Rose

                  Yeah that’s why I finished with:

                  But how do you know what the pitcher is like in that sense? That’s the real problem there.

                  I just think throwing upwards of 100 pitches at anywhere from 85-97 mph on a consistent schedule and then tweaking that schedule randomly, several times out of no where, may end up being just as detrimental to your health as thinking throwing more innings would be.

                  • http://www.riveraveblues.com Joseph Pawlikowski

                    Maybe so. I do think the Yanks are doing it a bit differently this time around. It sounds like they have a plan for where they’ll skip Hughes, rather than just at random times. That, I think, is the key. Preparation. Wang getting injured last year really threw off the plans with Joba.

          • http://leegrantphotography.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/madmax.jpg gxpanos

            Yeah, but you can name a bunch that did that and then got hurt the next year, too. Just because they’re HOFers doesn’t make them a more convincing argument than guys who blew their arm out.

            • Rose

              Yes, but I’m not saying that innings limits have absolutely nothing to do with injuries. I’m saying there is more to it. Inducing “innings limits” essentially means “we believe innings totals are the main reason pitchers get injured, so we are planning accordingly.” I’m just saying, in my opinion, that’s not the way it should be.

              • http://twitter.com/joero23 The Honorable Congressman Mondesi

                I understand your objection to the use of innings limits and I don’t think anyone who believes that pitchers’ workloads should be monitored/controlled would disagree that monitoring innings, independent of considering the workload within those innings, is wise. But I think you’re taking it a bit too far. You seem to assume that teams blindly follow innings limits without considering a pitcher’s workload within those innings and then argue against that practice, when it’s highly doubtful that they do that. And, in addition, if/when people refer to innings limits, it’s just done as an easy way to reference a pitcher’s workload. Yes, a pitcher’s workload may vary between innings – all innings are not created equal – but, over the course of a season or seasons, it is likely that you can kind of look to innings totals as a kind of short-hand, easy-reference benchmark of a pitcher’s workload. That’s all people are really talking about, nobody’s arguing that innings-limits are the be-all end-all and that we shouldn’t be keeping track of pitch-counts and other more specific measures of a pitcher’s workload.

                • Rose

                  I’ll agree with that. I kind of touched upon that above when I said:

                  I think it all evens out. You’re not going to throw 7 inning shut outs every outing. You’re going to throw a few bad ones or get up in your pitch count and be taken out accordingly anyway.

                  But I didn’t go into detail with the pitches in between. My view of innings being arbitrary is only part of it though. I understand they look at other things as well. They’re getting paid millions of dollars to protect their investments. And I’m also not saying I know more than they do about baseball or the human body…I was just basically stating my opinion as I believe that breaking routines, giant gaps, and inability to adapt to random changes may be just as detrimental as limiting innings because a few pitchers have gotten injured after their jumps the year before. But there’s no real way to tell either accurately I guess. Yet, anyway.

                  • Ross in Jersey

                    I think it all evens out. You’re not going to throw 7 inning shut outs every outing. You’re going to throw a few bad ones or get up in your pitch count and be taken out accordingly anyway.

                    I’d argue that going through a 40 pitch inning is a lot more stressful on the arm than three 15 pitch innings, but I get your point.

        • Pasqua

          “…messing around with a groove.”

          You lost me there. That’s a really fuzzy expression, and even if it wasn’t, it’s not hard to show that Hughes has actually been struggling for a few weeks now, not “grooving.”

          • Rose

            I wasn’t really concerning myself with your “directions” to be honest. If you got lost I can only attribute that to something more personal…but I’ll apologize because I’m a nice guy, anyway.

    • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

      Hughes has been pitching “mehly” since after the game against the Tigers. Not much coincidence, really.

  • http://leegrantphotography.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/madmax.jpg gxpanos

    Correlation doesn’t equal causation, but skipping starts seems like it might be a problem for these young guys. Now, skipping starts is better than treating Joba like ragdoll, but the Yanks need to bite the bullet and learn to shut guys down. I understand they have to rebuild on the fly, but part of that should include being deep enough (which they are, by the way) to sacrifice guys come the end of the season and the postseason rather than screwing with guys’ rhythms. Like someone said, this is crucial development time, and Hughes should be given as much normalcy and as few variables as possible to make changes without worrying about dealing with extra rest or whatever. (Things like, for example, throwing more CB’s, or developing the change.)

  • ZZ

    When Hughes has his explosive fastball that he can command to both sides of the plate and has a ton of life in the zone on it, it really doesn’t matter if you are expecting it. When he has that fastball, he can throw FB/cutter 85% of the time.

    But, on nights like last when he doesn’t have that fastball he has to have a back up plan. And having a back up plan means throwing enough curveballs and changeups in other starts to be confident to use them on nights when his fastball is not great.

    • Mike HC

      “When Hughes has his explosive fastball that he can command to both sides of the plate and has a ton of life in the zone on it, it really doesn’t matter if you are expecting it. When he has that fastball, he can throw FB/cutter 85% of the time.”

      Except that is not 100% true. Sure, when Hughes has his nastiest stuff, he will pitch well. But Hughes has had problems putting guys away with two strikes even on his hot streak, because they know the heat is coming, and all they have to do is foul it off. Eye level, bat speed, all pretty much stay the same. It is easy to get the timing down on 89-93 mph fastballs. An off speed pitch is really a necessity no matter how well the fastballs are working.

  • Ross in Jersey

    Really though, I wish the Yankees did what the Rays did with Price his first year as a starter. They kept him stashed in the minors until mid-season, then brought him up. He was then able to start every 5 days without the need to skip starts or hold him back. You keep his innings count down without messing up his schedule or timing.

    Maybe the Yankees were concerned about their normal slow start. And I know hindsight is 20/20, but we could have survived April and part of May with Mitre/Nova/whoever as the 5th starter until Hughes was ready to come up.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Really though, I wish the Yankees did what the Rays did with Price his first year as a starter. They kept him stashed in the minors until mid-season, then brought him up. He was then able to start every 5 days without the need to skip starts or hold him back. You keep his innings count down without messing up his schedule or timing.

      You: preaching
      Me: the choir

  • theyankeewarrior

    Cliff Lee’s contract is rising everyday

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Frankly, that’s good news for us.

      More of a likelihood he doesn’t sign and extension and hits the market, less true competition for his services when he gets there.

  • lawyerdan

    Is anyone getting as tired of Cervelli as I am? He is not a major league hitter, notwithstanding his early success, and looks less and less like a major league catcher. He is never in sync with his pitchers and appears to have no idea how to call a game. Is there any pitcher who doesn’t shake him off regularly? I shudder now when I see him in the lineup. He gets a ridiculous amount of playing time. If the second catcher is going to get that much time, why not Austin Romine?

    • abbey

      Cervelli is indeed an excellent major league catcher. Certainly better defensively. Named for 3 consecutive years by Baseball of America as the best defensive catcher for the Yankees. I think they know a little bit about catching and baseball!!
      I agree he hasnt had a good June however I anticipate he will rebound. The pitching staff LOVES him and loves for him to call games.
      I am not taking anything away from Posada (Cervelli speaks very highly of him) however to say that Cervelli does not belong here is a travesty.