Sep
18

Redoing the 2006 Draft

By

In this week’s Ask BA, Jim Callis answered a rather fun question: if the 2006 draft was held again, who would be the top picks? Taken 41st overall that year, Joba would jump up to #3 overall behind Timmy and Evan Longoria. The actual top three picks that year were Luke Hochevar, Greg Reynolds and Longoria. Woo hoo.

Everyone bashed the 2006 draft because it appeared to be a shallow talent pool, but looking back on it … man, there were some premium power arms available in that class. Timmy, Joba, Max Scherzer, Clayton Kershaw, Brandon Morrow, Brett Anderson, that’s quality right there. Then there’s guys like Travis Snider and Lars Anderson. Goes to show that no matter how crappy a draft class may look, there’s always talent available. You just need to be able to identify it.

Categories : Asides, Draft
  • UWS

    So what you’re saying is that we shouldn’t have the entire Yankees scouting department drawn and quartered just yet? Fascinating.

  • kenthadley

    June 2009 can make the next decade if we do the right things here….

  • Yank Crank 20

    I know this is off topic, sorry, but anyone notice Ben Sheets go down after only 28 pitches last night with an elbow injury? Referring to posts earlier in the week about the Yankees interest in Sheets over Sabathia…I certainly hope that interest has been put aside for good.

    • Yankee1010

      Agreed. He’s injury-prone enough as it is, but a tight forearm is all too often the precursor to TJ surgery.

      Go after Sabathia.

  • JRVJ

    Mike, someone made a funny, but dead-on comment on BTF recently about drafts.

    If memory serves me right, the point was that draft classes often look weak until some guys break out in the spring.

    As a coda to that, I’d mention that draft classes may actually end up being much better than anyone predicted when the draftees actually get on the field (conversely, a supposedly strong draft can turn out to be a bit of a lemon).

  • Baseballnation

    If I’m not correct though, all the guys you mentioned were considered premium talents prior to the draft and a drop in projected spots was due to technicalities like injury weariness such as Joba’s case or signability concern. I think after 2 years and some change we can say it was a relatively deep draft that has produced young stars in the majors already and more to come like Anderson, and Cahill….Especially a vital draft to the yankee pipeline.

  • Accent Shallow

    Everything always looks better in hindsight, doesn’t it? It’d be very interesting to compare that top 10 to the actual top 10 in a few years.

    Speaking of drafts, why couldn’t the Pirates have taken Wieters? Thanks jerks.

    And finally, are my expectations too high for wishing that the past few Yankees drafts had produced some ML-ready position players? Seems that the only one with much impact potential is A-Jack.

    (Of course, given development time, it’d be a minor miracle if any high school players from the Yankees ’06 or ’07 classes were ML ready)

    • AndrewYF

      The Pirates didn’t want to pay Wieters’ bonus demands, and ended up with what seems like a less talented Brian Bullington.

      They also ‘upgraded’ by taking Karstens and McCutchen over Coke and Kontos. They are not a good franchise.

  • Cliff Johnson’s pinch hit HR

    Despite what I would imagine is an entire army or two worth of Yankee scouts – plus their financial resources – the Red Sox and Rays have been finding the available talent far more consistently than the Yanks. But the Yanks do seem to have the market cornered on right-handed pitchers that require arm surgery.

    • UWS

      the Red Sox and Rays have been finding the available talent far more consistently than the Yanks.

      Well, there’s also the small issue of the Rays having the top 5 draft pick every damn year. Being an awful horrible franchise for a decade will do that.

      As for the Sox, they’ve done a great job, but they also started working on their farm system a few years before the Yankees did, so we have some catching up to do.

    • Yankee1010

      So, would you rather them take low-ceiling talent that is available late in the 1st round? A little patience would do you well. Since Cashman and Oppenheimer have been running the draft, they’ve added quite a bit of premium talent to the system.

      Oh, and Joba had injury “issues” in college, which is why the Yanks were able to get him. Maybe the Yanks should have passed on him.

    • http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CRsmithT1.jpg tommiesmithjohncarlos

      Cliff, I call bullshit on your argument. I want you to list out this “available talent” that they’ve been finding more consistently than we have.

      You made the claim, now back it up.

  • Cliff Johnson’s pinch hit HR

    Is everyone that posts on this site related to Brian Cashman? I still don’t think he deserves a marble statue in the new Monument Park but time will tell.
    “We” have a lot of catching up to do.

    • steve (different one)

      still waiting for you to back up your argment.

  • Reggie C.

    Who the heck is Greg Reynolds ??

  • Steve

    “Everyone bashed the 2006 draft because it appeared to be a shallow talent pool, but looking back on it … man, there were some premium power arms available in that class.”

    We seem to hear that every year, that the draft is “Short on premium talent” this particular year. And then looking back, guys who we thought were premium weren’t and others further down in the draft exceeded expectations.

    That’s why its tough to take it seriously when you hear things like that. The draft is such a crap shoot under the best circumstances. Plus, the MLB draft isn’t like the other major sports. Teams will draft guys in the later rounds who they think will develop into something down the road and entice them with a good signing bonus, effectively borrowing from next year’s draft. The players who accept could very well have been high draft picks the following year. So its not a linear “top talent automatically goes first” type of system.