Jul
06

Vazquez excellent as Yanks take opener from A’s

By

Javy Vazquez‘s last trip to Oakland was his first good one of the year. While he didn’t make it out of the sixth, he did hold the A’s to one run in the first five innings. He appeared to run out of gas in the sixth, giving up two runs on a homer, though the Yankees had already scored six by then. This time around went even better, with Vazquez finishing seven innings and allowing just one run. The Yanks offense didn’t get much off of Ben Sheets, but it was enough to complete a 3-1 victory.

Biggest Hit: Tex widens the lead

Photo credit: Ben Margot/AP

Remember when Tex started May on a hot streak and everyone said hey, look, Teixeira’s back? It looks like it’s happening again. With a 1 for 4 night that included a home run, he is now 8 for his last 18 with three walks, four doubles, and a homer. So Tex is back. Until he isn’t.

Heading into the later innings the Yankees needed runs. They held a 2-1 lead, but with the way the bullpen has been struggling lately the Yanks can always use more runs. Unfortunately the offense has been slumping a bit. They did have a number of hard-hit balls off Sheets, but many of them found a fielder’s glove. Mark Teixeira had a solution to that problem.

With none on and one out in the sixth Ben Sheets got working against Tex with fastballs, mostly away. On the last one he caught a bit of the plate and Tex whaled it over the center field wall to extend the Yankees’ lead. It wasn’t much, but it provided the more-comfortable two-run lead.

Biggest Pitch: Vazquez quells the mini-rally

Photo credit: Ben Margot/AP

Javy Vazquez had one of his best starts of the season, despite the lack of strikeouts. The A’s did manage to put the ball in play, but few balls were particularly well-struck. As a result, they didn’t have many baserunners during Javy’s seven innings, just five. Only once did they put two men on base in the same inning, the fourth, when Jack Cust walked and then beat Derek Jeter‘s leaping throw to second. That put runners on first and second with two down.

Gabe Gross worked a 2-1 count, but then fell behind when he fouled off the next two pitches. With the count 2-2 Vazuez delivered a high fastball and Gross got on top of it, grounding it to Cano and ending the threat. That was the last time in the game the A’s would have a runner in scoring position.

Miscellany

Photo credit: Ben Margot/AP

Francisco Cervelli is a lucky dude. He made weak contact three times yesterday, and the one time it went for a hit was when the Yanks had a runner on third. Luck of the BABIP. I’ll take it.

Joba’s last seven innings: 7 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 4 BB, 8 K. That’s a pretty good start right there. I think we make too much of the times he does give up runs. Because, contrary to what 2007 Joba™ may lead you to believe, he’s going to do that from time to time.

With Mo having pitched in four of the first five days this month, I expect he’ll be unavailable tomorrow night. Gotta score runs against Cahill, which many a team has struggled at this year.

Oh hey, 2 for 3 with runners in scoring position.

Graph and chart

More at FanGraphs. Also, the box score.

Up Next

CC’s back on the mound to face the aforementioned Cahill. It’s Game 2 in the run of five straight 10 p.m. starts.

Categories : Game Stories
  • mbonzo

    This game was hardly Yanks v. A’s but Pitchers versus Wendelstedt.
    http://www.brooksbaseball.net/.....type=7.gif

    • Chip

      Free strikeouts! Get your free strikeouts! Come one, come all, all you have to do is hit the glove wherever the catcher puts it and it’s a strike!

  • Cecala

    How could you not enjoy the plays made by A-Rod and the outfield.

  • http://www.soxandpinstripes.net JGS

    With Mo having pitched in four of the first five days this month, I expect he’ll be unavailable tomorrow night

    I’ll take my chances with road Joba and his 2.75 ERA and 11.4 K/9

  • Ed

    I think we make too much of the times he does give up runs.

    If anything, I think we’re giving him too much credit. From May 16th thru July 4th (B-Ref hasn’t updated yet), he’s got an 8.15 ERA. .342 / .400 / .447 batting line against. 17 K in 17.2 IP in that strech is nice, but that’s the only bright spot. That comes with 8 BB, 17 R, 16 ER.

    Without the memories of 2007-2008, we’d all be ready to get him off the roster ASAP.

    • Esteban

      aka fun with arbitrary endpoints

    • Esteban

      And shockingly, yes, past success usually does allow players more confidence and chances than players who have never had success. Crazy how that works huh?

      • Ed

        Way to miss the point.

        Yeah, he deserves more chances than most relievers do. That doesn’t mean we should ignore the fact that he’s been terrible for close to two months now.

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

          During those two months, his BABIP against;

          .433

          I’m sure some of that is Joba’s poor pitch execution leading to fat pitches easy to clobber, but certainly not all of it. Dude’s just had an exceptionally unlucky season all the way around.

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            Oh, and FWIW, emphasis mine:

            May 16th-July 4th: 8.15 ERA, 17/8/17.2 K/BB/IP, 17 R, 16 ER, .342/.400/.447 against (.433 BABIP)

            Apr 4th-May 14th: 2.16 ERA, 21/5/16.2 K/BB/IP, 4 R, 4 ER, .197/.258/.279 against (.282 BABIP)

            Again, I’m not saying everything is hunky-dory with Joba. He has stuff he needs to work on. Just saying, there’s a big disclaimer to the “he sucks the past two months” point.

          • Ed

            I agree with your point, but I don’t think as much of it is luck as you do.

            One thing to keep in mind – Joba’s 2008 and 2009 BABIP were .332 and .320. Other than his insane 2007, his BABIP has been on the high side. His career is so short it’s hard to say much with certainty here, but, a .433 BABIP for Joba isn’t as far out of line as it would be for most pitchers.

            I think that his stuff just isn’t consistent this year. Some day’s he’s throwing in the low 90′s, other days he’s in the mid to high 90′s.

            I also think that his tendency to go with down and away sliders on 2 strike counts is hurting him as well.

            Overall, I guess my take on it is that his stuff is very inconsistent this year, and he’s only pitching well on the days his pitches are working better. When he’s on, you get the dominating strikeout based performances, which lead to the good FIP. When he’s off he gets knocked around badly, which doesn’t really show up in FIP.

            • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

              One thing to keep in mind – Joba’s 2008 and 2009 BABIP were .332 and .320. Other than his insane 2007, his BABIP has been on the high side. His career is so short it’s hard to say much with certainty here, but, a .433 BABIP for Joba isn’t as far out of line as it would be for most pitchers.

              100 points of batting average is always “far out of line”.

              • Ed

                It didn’t say it wasn’t. I said it wasn’t as far out of line.

                Most pitchers have a BABIP around .300. A .433 BABIP would be 133 points out of line for the average pitcher, which would be about a 45% increase.

                Compared to Joba’s ’08 and ’09, it’s 101 and 113 points out of line. Those are increases of 30% and 35%.

                • Chip

                  I’m going to go ahead and say more than a standard deviation from the mean is significantly out of line. You’re basically saying that when Cervelli was batting .400 in the early season, it wasn’t very far away from his .325 career at that point and therefore could be sustainable. That’s just silly

                  • Ed

                    I don’t see how you’re getting that from what I’m saying.

                    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

                      Correct. You didn’t say it wouldn’t be far out of line, you said it wouldn’t be *as* far out of line. Technically, you’re correct; two standard deviations is larger than one standard deviation.

                      I concede your point; if things were different, they wouldn’t be the same.

                    • Chip

                      I agree with your point, but I don’t think as much of it is luck as you do.

                      The standard deviation for BABIP is something like .030 which puts Joba’s .433 BABIP over the time you stated something like 3-4 deviations from the mean (which really hasn’t had enough time to stabilize and should be lower in the bullpen but that’s another discussion). Also, for his season as a whole, his .383 on the season is nearly two deviations away thus he’s getting very very unlucky.

                      Put it this way, if Rivera hadn’t blown up against the Twins, Joba’s ERA would currently be at 4.33 which isn’t great but also isn’t terrible and that’s only correcting the strand rate

    • http://twitter.com/iiKeane JobaWockeeZ

      Call me crazy but I wouldn’t jump on his immediate release with his 2.35 FIP, 3.25 xFIP, and 2.62 tERA.

      • Brian in NH

        This

  • AAAA Commenter

    “I think we make too much of the times he does give up runs”

    That’s because Joba doesn’t give up runs, he gives up leads. Runs pour in when Joba is bad (which is more often than not).

    • http://twitter.com/iiKeane JobaWockeeZ

      That’s because Joba doesn’t give up runs, he gives up leads.

      Uhh he kinda has to do former to do the latter. And no he hasn’t been bad more than good when he’s been extremely unlucky. Imagine Cervelli except the opposite.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      That’s because Joba doesn’t give up runs, he gives up leads. Runs pour in when Joba is bad (which is more often than not).

      Fun Fact: entering last night, Joba had made 36 appearances. Including both inherited runners and runners he put on base himself, he’d given up runs in 12 of those 36 appearances (33%) but only changed a lead or a tie into a tie or a deficit on four actual occasions: April 23rd at the Angels, May 18th against the Red Sox, May 29th against the Indians, and July 2nd against Toronto.

      In the other 32 appearances he made, he entered either with a lead or a deficit and left with the lead or deficit still intact.

      4 out of 36: not “more often than not”

      • Brian in NH

        /small sample and confirmation bias’d

    • Ed

      Runs pour in when Joba is bad (which is more often than not).

      He’s been bad, but not *that* bad. Even in this terrible 2 month stretch he’s been having, more than half of his appearances have been scoreless.

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        Fun Fact #2:

        Joba’s given up (i.e. had charged to him) 21 runs this season. More than half of them (11) came in one 5 game stretch from May 16th to May 29th.

        In the 17 appearances before that, he gave up only 4 runs total. In the 14 appearances after that, he gave up 6 runs total.

        Statline altering hiccup FTL.

        • Chip

          Of those 11, 3 of them came with the immortal Mariano Rivera standing on the mound and Joba sitting in the dugout.

          Additionally, Joba’s line in high leverage situations:

          11.17 K/9 1.86 BB/9 .93 HR/9 2.62 FIP 2.69 xFIP .396 BABIP

          One of these things stands out, take a guess which one is completely out of a pitcher’s control.

          O yeah, one more, Joba hasn’t gotten a single pop-up yet (according to Fangraphs). For a guy who throws 95 mph, that’s shocking

          • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

            O yeah, one more, Joba hasn’t gotten a single pop-up yet (according to Fangraphs). For a guy who throws 95 mph, that’s shocking

            I’m actually not even mad. That’s amazing.

            • Chip

              Yeah, the guy had a 11% infield fly rate last season as a STARTER. He’s got about 3 more mph on the fastball this year but hasn’t gotten a single one yet

  • ROBTEN

    Remember when Tex started May on a hot streak and everyone said hey, look, Teixeira’s back? It looks like it’s happening again. With a 1 for 4 night that included a home run, he is now 8 for his last 18 with three walks, four doubles, and a homer. So Tex is back. Until he isn’t.

    Tex’s season has been disappointing thus far, but I wonder if we’re not expecting a massive correction which would bring his season numbers more in line with his career numbers when, in reality, he may end up only returning to close to his normal production and thus not able to dramatically impact his overall numbers.

    I mean:

    For his career, he’s: .287/.377/.536/.913

    In his “not-back” May, he was: .280/.366/.475/.840

    Since May 1st, he’s: .280/.373/.487/.860

    Granted, the numbers since May wouldn’t look as good if you were to exclude the hot start to July (May/June: .266/.360/.468/.828), but if we speculate that the turn around did begin in May, then even if the extra hot start to July fizzles out a bit and thus any correction is more gradual than dramatic, the evidence over the last two months still points to his returning to (almost, but not quite) normal. To be clear, it would be a disappointing season, but not as bad as (perhaps) it seems because of the horrendous start.

    Further, after writing this, I went back to examine Teixeira’s week-by-week stats and, since May, “streakiness” seems to be his modus operandi:

    May 1-7: .333/.429/.417/.845
    May 8-15: .333/.389/.818/1.207
    May 16-23: .176/.263/.206/.469
    May 25-31: .296/.406/.444/.851

    June 1-6: .125/.222/.167/.389
    June 8-15: .385/.515/.731/1.246
    June 16-23: .233/.343/.433/.776
    June 24-31: .250/.286/.500/.786

    July 1-4: .500/.556/.786/1.341

    So, certainly the numbers are down and June was a weaker month, but when averaged out, the “streakiness” starts to resemble his career line.

    This is why I wonder if it will end up being a “forgettable” season in the end–not dramatically disappointing, but not what you’d expect to see from Tex.

    • http://twitter.com/dpatrickg Dirty Pena

      Egg-fucking-zactly. Since April, he’s slumped a few times. I’m pretty sure “normal Tex” slumped every once in awhile. He’s basically been 90+% of himself since May. Maybe it’s just a down year, but if he continues at an .860-870 OPS for the rest of the year (as he has been since April), I think we’d all be OK with that.

    • Chip

      I’d be willing to bet most players seem to exhibit the “streakiness” you find with the week by week breakdown. In a sample size of 15 ABs, you can make anybody look like Babe Ruth or Juan Pierre

      • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

        In a sample size of 15 ABs, you can make anybody look like Babe Ruth or Juan Pierre

        FACT: Hensley Meulens is the greatest Yankee of all time.

      • ROBTEN

        I’d be willing to bet most players seem to exhibit the “streakiness” you find with the week by week breakdown. In a sample size of 15 ABs, you can make anybody look like Babe Ruth or Juan Pierre

        This is my point. That if we’re expecting Tex to put up the first two weeks of May for the rest of the season, it’s probably not going to happen, but over a longer stretch of time, his performance since May evens out to close to his career line. The .63 point drop from his career OPS is not something to celebrate, but he’s essentially halved the .136 point drop that appears when you factor in April.

  • http://leutbneot.wordpress.com sam

    Good win today. Vazquez and Tex coming around could be a good sign for this team in the second half. Also, how proud are you guys for Hughes making All-Star? I know it’s a dumb popularity contest and means nothing (except for dumb-ass writers like Heyman who use their own peculiar brand of circular non-logic as a way of keeping Raines and Blyleven out of the HOF… arrrrgh), but I feel almost like a proud parent with Phil. Watched him come all the way up from AA, struggle, come back from rough injuries, and finally come through the way we all knew he could and win a ring, to boot. Just puts a smile on my face.

    Also, happy belated Fourth to all the RAB crew and commenters. I wrote a little paean for the occasion over at my blog but it sort of devolved into a political screed, so I won’t link to it. Still, it’s a good holiday and a good day to be an American, watching the best national pasttime on the planet (sorry, soccer – not quite there yet for me, but go Uruguay, I guess!)

    Also, for some reason, some commenter over at my blog dug up an old post (literally over a year old – I don’t even really remember writing it) from my archives in which I said I would club a baby seal if Carl Pavano started winning with the Twinkies after he picked up his final check from NYY. I love animals, and baby seals are really cute, so I must have been pretty pissed at the time, but I figured that was all done with and in the past. After revisiting it, though, I really couldn’t help myself… the hatred, which I had thought long subsided, boiled back to the surface so quickly that I was honestly astonished with the subsequent “DIE CARL PAVANO” post that followed. It’s long, vengeful, and CRAZY ANGRY… probably the nastiest thing I’ve ever written. I really still have deep seated feelings of resentment towards that guy. Anyone else here still feeling that? Or am I alone in my hatred? Just curious. I feel like he did the most of any player, ever, to really denigrate and insult the pinstripes. Just a total lack of respect for his team, the fans, his management, his teammates, the organization in general, and the history. And despite how long it’s been, I was genuinely surprised… the hate is still there.

    I hope I’m not alone. I don’t want to be that one crazy guy who can’t get over his hatred of one loser player. I don’t want to be the Red Sox fan who still blames Buckner for his divorce. Sooooo…. anyone else share my Pavano pain?

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      Who the hell is Carl Pavano?

      • http://theyankeeu.com Matt Imbrogno

        I believe Carl Pavano is an old, old wooden ship used during the Civil War era.

        • http://leutbneot.wordpress.com sam

          Carl Pavano was actually the RMS Lusitania. You heard it here first. Carl Pavano was responsible for bringing the US into WWII.

  • Sweet Dick Willie

    Joba’s last seven innings: 7 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 4 BB, 8 K. That’s a pretty good start right there.

    When did a 1.57 WHIP become “pretty good”?

    To me, giving up only 2 runs with that line is “pretty lucky” and “pretty unsustainable”.

  • AndrewYF

    So, Dallas Braden still doesn’t realize that everyone is laughing at him:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/blo.....r-wit.html

    When does the MSM at large start to view Braden as a player who is clueless and doesn’t know when to shut his mouth? It’s sad that this is what Braden will likely be remembered most for, rather than his perfect game. And it’s entirely his fault.

    • Chip

      Hahaha, that’s great! Suddenly Braden realized that he’ll go down as a guy with a big mouth rather than a good pitcher and he wants to pretend like nothing happened. Also, in other MSM news, it’s good to see Cano is over his depression from losing Melky to the Braves

  • ZZ

    People get far too caught up in BABIP in small samples especially when it comes to relievers.

    BABIP does not automatically equal luck especially in these small samples.

    In May and June Joba Chamberlain only threw 391 pitches. That is less than 4 games worth of pitches for a starting pitcher.

    Saying for 2 months Joba has been unlucky makes it sound like it is some sort of significant amount of time. But it isn’t.

    It is nowhere close to what Austin Jackson did for the first 2 months of the season for example.

    Also, since the sample is so small for relief pitchers BABIP can fluctuate drastically with just one or 2 appearances. Joba could be awful like he has for a couple appearances, get knocked around, and increase his BABIP drastically. Yet, this has nothing to do with luck.

    It is a pretty big stretch to automatically say Joba has been unlucky.

    From when people scream BABIP at bat to at bat or even month to month with relief pitchers, that is just a misunderstanding of the statistic and its use.

    BABIP=/=luck especially in small samples.

    • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

      It is a pretty big stretch to automatically say Joba has been unlucky.

      Agreed. Which is why all of us who cited BABIP said that Joba’s poor 2010 season has PROBABLY been a COMBINATION of luck AND poor performance/execution. Nobody in this thread has said that Joba’s high BABIP over any small sample size is AUTOMATICALLY luck and luck alone.

      Please don’t argue against strawmen.

      • ZZ

        My point was not saying that it is a stretch to say alone he has been unlucky.

        That he has been unlucky at all is a stretch considering the argument presented fundamentally misuses the BABIP statistic

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

          No.

          The fact that his sample size is small does not mean that luck cannot be offered as a possible reason or contributing factor for his BABIP being high. The argument does not misuse the BABIP statistic. Luck can most definitely be a factor in a high BABIP.

          As Fangraphs itself notes:

          The initial concept of BABIP is that pitchers do not have control over what happens to balls once they are hit into the field of play.

          BABIP typically fluctuates from year to year with a baseline of around .300. If a pitcher has a particularly high or low BABIP, we may say he’s been lucky or unlucky. Things are of course not quite this simple, but for the most part the rule holds true.

          http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs.....-pitchers/

          • ZZ

            Luck can be offered in small samples, but you didn’t that at all. Your argument is basically completely baseless when the only thing you cite is BABIP. I

            Saying that he has been unlucky because his BABIP is high is a huge stretch.

            If you are going to offer luck as an explanation you need MUCH more than that, because a BABIP over a sample that small is extremely prone to bias and is just as likely to that luck never factored into the equation that it didn’t.

            You presented no evidence that he has been unlucky other than his BABIP being high.

            Fangraphs is talking about year to year samples. Not stretch of 391 pitches.

            I’m sorry but you are completely off base here unequivocally saying that unluckiness has factored into Joba’s season to date.

            The statistic simply does not work like that.

            • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

              No. To all of this.

              I don’t have to prove with more evidence that luck is a factor, YOU have to prove with more evidence that luck ISN’T a factor. In baseball, you ALWAYS have to assume that luck is a factor, because so much of baseball is luck/chance/randomness based.

              The chief piece of knowledge gained from the study of BABIP is that pitchers have very little control over what happens to balls hit into the field of play. Whether they become outs or hits is largely determined by luck. They can attempt to influence their BABIP’s by limiting line drives and hard contact as much as possible, but even line drive rates are influenced by luck. Every single sample set in existence contains good/bad luck factors, whether it’s a several thousand PA career or a few dozen PA week. You’re the one trying to make a counterintuitive claim, not me. Therefore, you’re the one who needs to demonstrate your hypothesis with additional information, not me.

              • ZZ

                This is the problem with statistics becoming mainstream in baseball.

                The vast majority of people that use them just have no understanding whatsoever of what these statistics really mean and how to use them except for little blurbs on sites like fangraphs.

                Making unequivocal statements and conclusions, like you did, based on a sample as small as Joba’s last 2 months is irresponsible and basically worthless.

                It is not my job to disprove what you are saying. You are doing that on your own because you are making baseless conclusions.

                You even admit yourself you are making assumptions. You don’t ALWAYS have to be assume luck, because that is not the way statistics work.

                I have no hypothesis. There is not nearly enough available evidence to form any sort of reliable hypothesis.

                What I am doing is pointing out that your conclusion means nothing, because of the unreliable evidence you used to support it.

                • Chip

                  So you’re saying that either Joba has been good or Joba has been bad but that we can’t really tell because he’s either unlucky or this is his true talent level.

                  I’d say that Joba has struggled but he’s pitched better than a 5 ERA says. And it’s not just BABIP that says this, it’s also apparent in his strand rate.

                  Basically what he’s saying that, while what’s done is done and that’s settled, his numbers that are statistically shown to be an accurate predictor of what will happen are all very good. He’s probably due for some negative regression on homers but he’s due a ton of positive regression due to BABIP and strand rate.

                  That’s how tommie is using statistics and it’s absolutely the right way to do it

                  • http://youcantpredictbaseball.wordpress.com/ bexarama

                    That.

                    Also, from your posts, ZZ, it’s exceedingly obvious that you just don’t like Joba and you’re looking for any way to discredit him, pretty much.

      • Ed

        Nobody in this thread has said that Joba’s high BABIP over any small sample size is AUTOMATICALLY luck and luck alone. Please don’t argue against strawmen.

        He’s not claiming that anyone thought that it was only luck.

        He’s saying that luck shouldn’t come into the discussion until you get a much larger sample size than anything we’ve been talking about here.

        • http://twitter.com/tsjc68 tommiesmithjohncarlos a/k/a Ridiculous Upside the Elder

          He’s saying that luck shouldn’t come into the discussion until you get a much larger sample size than anything we’ve been talking about here.

          I know that that’s what he’s saying. He’s wrong, though.

          • ZZ

            “I’m sure some of that is Joba’s poor pitch execution leading to fat pitches easy to clobber, but certainly not all of it. Dude’s just had an exceptionally unlucky season all the way around.

            This statement along with the many other you made is completely inaccurate given the evidence you presented.

            And it completely misuses the statistic.

        • ROBTEN

          He’s saying that luck shouldn’t come into the discussion until you get a much larger sample size than anything we’ve been talking about here.

          If anything, it is precisely the opposite. In a small sample, any deviation is more likely due to luck or randomness. The point is that we’re not simply talking about 391 pitches in isolation, but in relation to his entire career.

          In the broader sense, it is the very point of the BABIP statistic to take “luck” into account. If a pitcher’s BABIP against is abnormally high in a sss, while his other peripherals remain relatively constant and comparable to the rest of his career, it is likely due to luck. Of course, nobody has said that it is absolutely and only luck, just that all things being equal, it is probably luck.

          If it happens over an entire season and, as a result of accumulating additional data, you begin to see shifts in other peripherals, then you can begin to draw different conclusions.

          This was the point: Joba’s BABIP in relation to his FIP,xFIP, and tERA all lend evidence to the possibility that Joba is going through an unlucky period.

    • Ed

      Well said.