Mar
18

Yankees spent close to $3M on international players in 2011

By

The Yankees have traditionally been one of the biggest spenders on the international market, but last year they only spent approximately $2.93M on players according to Ben Balder. That ranks 11th out of the 30 teams. The Rangers were by far the biggest spenders last year at $12.83M, with most of it going to two outfielders: Nomar Mazara ($4.95M) and Ronald Guzman ($3.45M). Those are the first and third largest bonuses in history. The Yankees top signing was Dominican third baseman Miguel Andujar at $750k.

Thanks to the new Collective Bargaining Agreement, every team will be allowed to spend just $2.9M on international free agents in 2012 starting July 2nd. The spending pool will be based on winning percentage starting in 2013, with the good clubs getting the least amount of money to spend. Once a team exceeds their spending pool, they lose future international free agent money. Cuban outfielder Jorge Soler can sign for any amount prior to July 2nd, and it sounds like he’s going to get close to $20M, if not more.

45 Comments»

  1. bpdelia says:

    Man I’m a very rational guy and not at all a Cassandra type but this is pretty damn dissapointing. Everyone knew the CBA was going to seriously deal with IFA’s in fact there was and remains SERIOUS discussions about an IFA draft. Seems to me the prudent thing to do would have been to spend as much as possible and gobble up every good prospect they could knowing full well that the new CBA was going to limit over slots signings and IFA’s (basically THE two ways the yankees had to get young elite talent.

    Missed opportunity and leaves me thinking this will be a major regret in 3-5 years.

    Soler is a total freaking must in my opinion now (though obviously my opinion doesn’t mean shit.)

    • Havok9120 says:

      Depends on if there was anyone they saw as being worth the money. If there wasn’t, why should they spend it? Just because they might not be able to in the future?

      I know nothing about the IFA class. It’d could’ve been loaded with sure thing studs that we missed out on. Or it could have been filled with overpriced and overhyped marginal prospects. I have no clue, and trust the team’s judgement more than my own.

    • KL says:

      You sound like the typical spoiled Yankee fan who just wants them to buy everything. The one that every other fan in baseball hates.

      It is going to be hard for you the next few years.

      • bpdelia says:

        Its not at all gonna be toggle for me. Quite frankly the rangers have an enviable and superior system and they saw two players to invest in heavily. Fact is they simply wont have an opportunity to get a Sanchez or monger EVER AGAIN. PERIOD. This was the last opportunity to use this advantage and i for one trust the rangers into scouting WAY more than the Yankees. So yeah. Missed opportunity. As for spoiler fan what the hell arr toy talking about. I had season tickets all through the 80 s and 90s. I was against the burnett signing. I don’t want a hamels signing and think the team is right to drastically reduce patrol. The way to DO THAT is to invest in players who will produce wins for league minimum. Hence spending the money on Iras. Subtract ibanez and Chavez and you are halfway to one of the players the rangers signed. Its not about buying everything its about spending wisely, call me skeptically that the rangers and every other team that bid a player up to 4.5 were wrong and the Yankees right.

        The Yankees are partly in this payroll.mess as a result of not developing enough starting major league players.

        Sorry you’re wrong

        • Mike Axisa says:

          Fact is they simply wont have an opportunity to get a Sanchez or monger EVER AGAIN. PERIOD.

          Sorry, you’re wrong. The talent will still be there, the kids just aren’t going to get as much money as before. The Sanchezes and Monteros will still be out there, and the Yankee brand sells itself.

  2. The Moral Majority is Neither says:

    Sounds like the Yankees wanted to practice complying with the limit so that they were ready for next year.

  3. pat says:

    Time and time again tanks have shown they don’t give a crap about what other teams and independent evaluators think about other players. They’ve been doing their own thing for years now and I’ve learned to trust the process. You can buy a crapload of Ravel Santana’s and Manny Banuelos’ for what the Rangers paid for those two guys.

  4. RobertGKramer@AOL.Com says:

    Gotta feel this new CBA will face serious legal challenges on both the domestic and international drafts. But, I am completely ignorant of any legal precedents in other professional sports with salary restrictions. I’d love to see an article from the RAB legal expert!

    • Havok9120 says:

      As far as I understand it, the simple version is that they’re a private corporation providing regulating the internal workings of their own corporation. If it passes the internal approval process of the MLB, i.e. the owners, players, and league officials, then there’s nothing really to challenge. The teams had their say, and if they didn’t like it they should have stopped it.

      Of course, they DO like it for various reasons. I mean, I guess IFA’s (and possibly American draftees) could argue that this is effectively price fixing in reverse for their services by what is effectively a monopoly on American baseball. The problem with that is that there are other leagues, and there are no rules REQUIRING you to play in America. Joining the MLB’s system is a choice, and if you choose to join then you have to abide by the rules, just as you do as a student at a university or an employee at a corporation.

      • Ted Nelson says:

        It is anti-competitive (monopolistic), but for some reason they are granted an exception (as are NBA, NFL, NHL…).

    • Tom says:

      Who’s going to challenge it?

      There are no caps…. this is similar to the salary threshold… teams can exceed it they just have to pay a tax. And in the IFA market it is just a tax and a max on what you can spend on any one single player the next year (and you still have an unlimited budget if you are willing to pay tax)

      The draft is a bit difference as there is a tax and pick forfeiture, but again there is no “cap” – if the Yankees want to sign their 30th pick next year for 10mil they are free to do so… they just have to pay tax on everything above the draft budget level and forfeit a pick next year.

      The only fols that would seem to have standing are the teams themselves, but since they approved the CBA, I don’t see how they can turn around and challenge something they just approved.

  5. AWESOME Mike says:

    we all get to be the 1s to be in latin america. when it comes the players will no it. alone in the dark we be in this maatter. my as friend always says to be a little man is bretter than the red snox

  6. Gonzo says:

    I want names and reports! All I got is Andujar.

    I need to fill out my mental 2017 roster dangnabbit.

  7. Rich in NJ says:

    It seems to me that if you have one last chance to spend big money, and you basically have a ton of money, you spend the money.

    • kenthadley says:

      or you stick it in your pocket and tell everyone for the next 5 years that making the playoffs is the definition of success…..

    • Havok9120 says:

      Spending money for the heck of it is silly. If there were players we saw as worth it, Hal and Cash have proven in the past that they would’ve spent for them. There weren’t so they didn’t. I trust their judgement in the IFA process far more than I do ours.

  8. Jamey says:

    Soler, let’s do this.

  9. Derick says:

    I trust the Yankees in IFA. Most of our top prospects are from the IFA. And andujar sounds like a beast from everything I read about him.

  10. hogsmog says:

    Does this mean that there’s basically no chance to sign a Yu Darish-type pitcher (somebody who would deserve a wage higher than 2.9m) as a FA, and the only way to pick them up would be through posting/bidding on negotiation rights?

    • pat says:

      I believe it only applies to “amateur” free agents. Japanese and Cuban players are exempt because they had pro status in their home leagues. I could be wrong though.

      • Havok9120 says:

        Not sure about Cubans, but you’re essentially right about our friends across the Pacific by my understanding. They have a separate process because the MLB already considers them pros.

        • jjyank says:

          This is true. However, if Darvish is a “pro”, why is he allowed to be eligible for rookie of the year voting?

          Not trying to be snarky, I’m actually curious. Guys like Darvish are more polished then some 22 year old coming up from the minors.

          • Havok9120 says:

            I asked that to some people more knowledgeable than myself once. Best they could give me was that it was “a hole in the rules.” It certainly makes no sense given that the spirit of the rule seems to be a nod toward the fact that most Japanese players making the jump to the MLB will be in their 30s.

            After all, the rule is geared toward the average Japanese player coming off the average Japanese contract. Contracts that can easily last a decade or so without anyone batting an eye. Is there an age limit on the ROY? That might make some sense.

            • Tom says:

              The Japanese league is exempt from the caps (both posting fee and salary)

              Cuba is no different than any other IFA, and technically that prospect needs to establish residence somewhere else anyway as you can not sign a player directly from Cuba.

              Any player older than 23 on the IFA market is also exempt from the cap. So if a guy like Cespedes was on the market under the new rules his contract wouldn’t count at all toward the spending limit and teams could sign him for anything with no penalty tax implication

          • Voice of Reason says:

            It’s not a “hole in the rules,” it’s that a Japanese player has never played in the Majors before, pretty cut and dry really. Besides, minor leaguers are professional baseball players as well.

        • Needed Pitching says:

          Cubans (and other IFA’s) under 23 are apparently subject to the new rules

          from Mike Axisa’s wrap up:

          Players under 23 years old and with less than years of professional baseball experience will be considered amateurs and count against the spending cap. That means guys like Yoenis Cespedes and Japanese veterans will be treated as a true free agents. Japanese players run through the posting system will not count against the cap.

          http://riveraveblues.com/2011/.....ore-59604/

  11. konyhead says:

    NOMAR!?

  12. Manny's BanWagon says:

    Considering they don’t have much in terms of corner outfielders in the upper minors and the fact that they’re gonna be limited with the international cap and draft cap, I can’t see a good reason not to go all in for Soler since this is really their last chance to make a splash.

    • Sweet Dick Willie says:

      Considering the rate at which prospects, even top prospects, don’t pan out, $20 million is a huge bet to make on a 19 year old.

      I’m not saying they shouldn’t do it, but I can certainly understand if they choose not to.

    • Needed Pitching says:

      I generally agree, though I’m not sure he helps with the lack of depth in the upper minors. He’s only 19 I believe, I’d think he would probably be starting out in low A ball, maybe high A at best.

  13. RetroRob says:

    It’s almost like the Yankees knew what changes were coming under the CBA and did their June draft and international signings under the new rules. Of course, that would make no sense.

    BTW What’s the deal with Soler? Is there a chance he might not be granted residency before June? It’s only ten weeks away, and if he doesn’t get it before then, he is under the spending restrictions, meaning he won’t get $20 million, he’ll get $2 million. I’d be stressing if I was him.

  14. awy says:

    what’s so hard about admitting the yankees were heavily owned by the rangers jays etc in the recent IFA market

Leave a Reply

You may use <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong> in your comment.

If this is your first time commenting on River Ave. Blues, please review the RAB Commenter Guidelines. Login for commenting features. Register for RAB.