Jun
06

Report: Bosch tried to extort A-Rod before turning to MLB

By

Via the NY Daily News: Biogenesis chief Anthony Bosch tried to extort money from Alex Rodriguez before agreeing to cooperate with MLB’s investigation into the South Florida performance-enhancing drug pipeline. A-Rod refused the apparent six-figure request.

In return for cooperating with the investigation, MLB will drop their lawsuit against Bosch, cover any legal bills and civil liability, and provide him with bodyguards. Trying to extort Alex before rolling over for the league doesn’t exactly help Bosch’s credibility here. This is some shady business.

Categories : Asides, STEROIDS!

47 Comments»

  1. Bob Buttons says:

    For all we know he’d still go to the MLB for a plea deal after extortion.

  2. JW says:

    What a shady business MLB has gotten itself into. Bosch may have tried to extort A-Rod, but it’s clear that MLB has extorted the “cooperation” of Bosch by its (frankly absurd) lawsuit and — one can only assume — threats to sic law enforcement on him.

    And so, what does MLB have against A-Rod and the rest? A notebook and the word of Bosch. Without anything more, it’s an incredibly hollow case. And don’t forget, by the way, that the league really isn’t supposed to be leaking all of this to the press. But make no mistake, it is delighting in dragging all these guys through the mud. It is pathetic. The union should have a field day.

    • Paul D says:

      agreed totally. you saved me the trouble of typing that. MLB extorted bosch by way of the lawsuit.

      • JD says:

        That is an interesting perspective. It’s extortion for MLB to sue someone who is helping people cheat. MLB has to protect its product.

        • Paul D says:

          if you are some broke dude and I am some rich company, I can get u to do what I want by threat of bankrupting you through legal proceedings. not as clear cut as the old “protection money” scheme, but extortion nonetheless….

    • The Real Me says:

      And so, what does MLB have against A-Rod and the rest? A notebook and the word of Bosch. Without anything more, it’s an incredibly hollow case.

      This may be true, however all of the evidence they have may not be out yet. We won’t know what they have until any hearings that come about are over. They may or may not have a strong case. We’ll see.

      • Preston says:

        The evidence shouldn’t be out at all. The league isn’t supposed to release any drug suspension info until all appeals are exhausted. They instead are leaking it before they’ve even handed it out to the players. This is either a horribly mismanaged office or they are hoping that they can put pressure on the union not to fight tooth and nail by convicting the players in the court of public opinion first. Neither speaks well of old Bud.

  3. trr says:

    Shady Business is putting it mildly, Mike. This is going to be one ugly shitstorm of lawsuits, accusations, denials, lies, half-truths, recriminations, the whole 9 yards….and it could easily drag on into 2014. There may no winners here, and the biggest loser of all may be Major League Baseball. Thank God we have the Game itself!

  4. I'm not the droids you're looking for.. says:

    I can’t believe Brennan Boesch would do that!

  5. Paco Dooley says:

    If he has solid evidence, this will be Alex’s get out of jail free card. Once Bosch asked him for money (assuming it is on the record), he gave up his credibility to testify against him.

    • Cuso says:

      It is shady that it happened, but the effect on A-Rod’s possible suspension is negligible.

      It won’t have any relevance to whether or not he gets suspended.

      • Bo Knows says:

        It actually does, if there is an independent arbiter in this thing, having an untrustworthy main (and frankly only) witness like Bosch only helps Arod.

        • Mikhel says:

          MLB doesn’t need an independent arbitrer, they just need a reasonable cause of doubt to suspend a player. If it were a trial, maybe it could “help” Alex and others, but since it is not a trial…

          • Betty Lizard says:

            If Alex or the others appeal the suspension, it goes to arbitration. The arbiter upholds the suspension or strikes it down.

            I swore I’d never practice law again, but if I were a lawyer I’d love to have the players’ case.

        • The Real Me says:

          This is MLB we’re talking about. It could just be a lynch mob, not an independent arbiter.

  6. Bo Knows says:

    Objectively I’m not sure how Bosch can be believed, he tried this with Arod chances are he tried it with who knows how many others. This mess is not going to stick and frankly it shouldn’t. Too many questions, and Bosch has shown himself to be a crook it’s not a stretch to assume he’ll lie to save his own skin.

    • hmelawyer says:

      I think people on this site would be shocked by how many real legal cases are decided based on the testimony of shaky witnesses, including those who have either flipped and taken a deal or who are confidential informants who have lived a life of crime. Taking it out of the criminal context and into civil, the documents with testimony may be enough to overcome a preponderance of the evidence standard. Further, Bosch deciding to testify may be the start and now other workers from the clinic may chime in too.

      I am not saying there may not be a successful defense here, but I think that too many people think that just because a witness has problems it is dispositive of the case. Further, everybody needs to be real about the fact that when you are engaging in illegal behavior all the witnesses who were involved are going to have some credibility problems.

  7. Wheels says:

    That must have been a hell of a conversation. To be a fly on the wall…

  8. jjyank says:

    Good god. This whole thing is becoming more and more like a bad TV show. I’m so tired of this crap.

    • Betty Lizard says:

      Alex Rodriguez is one of my favorite players ever. I love his physical talent, his genius baseball IQ, and the way he mentors other players. People hope for “generational players.” He is one.

      I hope that he rehabs, comes back to the Yankees stronger than ever and hit the snot out of the ball. This season.

      If it’s ever proven he took PEDs again, I’ll be very dissappointed. But until he fails a drug test, I’m not going to believe the word of some criminal scum.

      • jjyank says:

        I agree with you 100%, Betty. He’s not my favorite player, but I do like him. A-Rod (and everyone) is innocent until proven guilty in my book.

        • hmelawyer says:

          He is innocent until proven guilty in my book too. I am just not going to totally discount Bosch’s account because he is shady. I also don’t think that the drug tests are more credible than Bosch. How many drug tests did Lance Armstrong pass? How many shady characters said he was doping? Which was more credible in the end.

          • The Real Me says:

            +1. My stance exactly.

          • jjyank says:

            I never said that Bosch’s account was useless because he’s shady. It probably helps A-Rod slightly, but I’m not naive enough to think it would throw out the case.

            Until I see a failed drug test, I don’t really give a shit. That’s what it comes down to, for me. Bosch can sing his heart out, but there needs to be more than that to condemn a player’s career.

          • BrienTaylorsRookieCard says:

            Exactly hmelawyer. You’re talking a lot of sense here.

            Alos, what’s the inverse – we’d believe these guys were on PEDs if you got their drugs from a reputable, upstanding member of society?

            And who leaked the story about Bosch extorting A-rod for money? A-rod?

      • The Real Me says:

        I’m not going to believe the word of some criminal scum.

        Unfortunately, Alex falls into this category as much as Bosch does. He’s already admitted once that he took PEDs, which is illegal making him, in your words “criminal scum”.

        hmelawyer stated this very well above:

        “everybody needs to be real about the fact that when you are engaging in illegal behavior all the witnesses who were involved are going to have some credibility problems.”

        This includes those being named, unfortunately.

        • Betty Lizard says:

          The difference is I don’t have to believe Rodriguez. Or disbelieve him. I do have to believe MLBs evidence and witnesses. MLB may have a strong case. We’ll see. Just speaking for myself, I won’t be convinced absent a positive drug test and I find Bosch and his notebooks laughable.

          I used to be a lawyer. I understand credibility and credibility problems. I’m not naive.
          I’m not a lawyer here. I’m a fan.
          And I’ve stated my bias, which is that I greatly admire Rodriguez as a baseball player.

          I will wait for this process, which is already tainted by being public, play out.

      • TomH says:

        Agree! This is becoming a very dirty business, with all the appearance of a vendetta of some kind. Selig may think this will show that MLB is dedicated to the elimination of PEDs, but there is a very good chance it will have the effect of making people think the sport is rotten. In the meantime, various other sports–And You know who you are, Other Sports–can sit quietly in the shade of MLB’s public disgrace, continuing to turn a blind eye to their all-too-obvious users.

  9. BK2ATL says:

    This should be fun to see how it plays out. No official positive drug tests on Braun nor A-Rod. A shady individual who even the gov’t turned away from. Yet, here’s MLB going down this road. Even after it’s made public that this dude tried to exhort money out of A-Rod for his silence. It’s not gonna be pretty and will tarnish pretty much all of MLB for a while.

    A-Rod’s not a saint by any means, but this MLB vendetta game that’s been going on since they cheerled McGwire and Sosa for the ratings and then blew Bonds out of baseball, while tolerating Clemens. MLB’s gonna finally get what it deserves. Public indifference.

  10. hmelawyer says:

    Is it a vendetta to actually try to enforce rules and catch people who cheat. It is a funny world when the league is attacked for trying to stop cheating. Remember the entire premise of these doping operations is to beat the tests. This never-ending pressure that the league will get its man is the only way to stop this type of cheating. See the Lance Armstrong case for an example.

    As I have said before, do you think you will ever have a case where the person illegally supplying PEDs is not going to be a “shady individual.” I don’t think the fact that he sought payment from AROD to keep quiet about illegal behavior is all that shocking or further undermines credibility for someone who was illegally distributing drugs. Kinds of fits actually.

    • LK says:

      “This never-ending pressure that the league will get its man is the only way to stop this type of cheating.”

      I disagree. There is *no* way to stop this type of cheating. I honestly can’t understand why the people who claim to hate it so much continue to follow sports. It’s not going away.

      • jjyank says:

        It’s always been around in one form or another. Some players will always look for an edge, that mentality cannot be universally squashed. So yes, I agree. I think MLB should do the tests, keep them as up to date as possible, punish those that fail, and otherwise just let it go.

    • Manny's BanWagon says:

      This x infinity.

  11. LK says:

    The game just feels so much cleaner now than in the late-90s when everybody was hitting homers.

  12. pat says:

    Thank god Arod is on the DL right now. This would be 10x the shitstorm if he were actually playing.

  13. JonS says:

    Supposedly MLB has a bunch of documents with names and payments. They are coded so they only need Bosch to tell them the code. It’s not like he’s their only evidence.

  14. Neil says:

    MLB investigation sounds just like the NCAA investigation of the Univ of Miami. Will stoop as low as it takes to get the desired results.

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