May
04

Mariano Rivera’s post-game comments

By
Categories : Players

124 Comments»

  1. dkidd says:

    this can’t be it

    can’t be

  2. Knoxvillain says:

    This was worse than watching Posada announce his retirement. Jesus Christ.

    He’ll be back though. He’ll come back next year and put up his usual 1.85 with 40 saves. Nothing can stop Mo. No way does he retire like this. He might not know it now, but there is no way he goes out like this.

  3. Claudia Wittel says:

    I just cried watching this… He could NEVER let the team down! He is staying to “make sure the guys are ok…” Wow…what a great example. If only this world had more men of character and integrity like that! He is a true leader, athlete and champion. I’m praying…

  4. yankees died today says:

    it’s all over guys, it’s all over

    • Jesse says:

      Might as well not watch the games or talk/write about this team ever again.

      /Am I doing it right?

    • NYFAN says:

      Your a jerk!!! The best closer in MLB baseball just gave a heartfelt interview and your acting like an idiot….

  5. Dan says:

    I’ve run out of curse words. Someone help?

  6. Endlessmike says:

    Jorge Posada had to retire because he knew nobody would want him.Bernie wanted to play jazz more then baseball and didn’t take Joe Torres olive branch minor league contract. Pettitte might spend more time in court than playing baseball.

    I don’t think I can see Mo end he’s career cathching a stupid fly ball and rolling in pain.

  7. Duh Innings says:

    If it’s any consolation:

    http://www.baseball-reference......st01.shtml

    …then go to the 1994-96 Yankees for who closed games for them.

    Steve Farr posted a 2.19 ERA with 23 saves for a 71-win 1991 Yankees team then a 1.56 ERA with 30 saves for a 76-win 1992 Yankees team, and the 1993 Yankees still won 88 games despite their closer Farr posting a 4.21 ERA (he did collect 25 saves.) ‘Can’t find his success rate as Baseball Reference doesn’t record blown saves / save opportunities.

    The question is: Will D-Rob or whoever the closer is be closer to ’92 Farr or ’93 Farr? We have to hope ’92 Farr. Anyone who wants to run “Farr had far less pressure than the 2012 Yankees post-Mo closer will have, BS cuz I could run everyone expects whoever to fail or not be anywhere close to being as good as Mo and no one including the Yankees expects him to be, so he’ll go for broke pressure-free.

    Of course, the REAL question will be “How close will D-Rob be to being Mo?” to which the answer should be “Don’t even compare him to Mo.” Compare D-Rob to Farr and other guys not named Mariano Rivera as it’s unfair and pointless.

    Steve Howe, Bob Wickman, and Xavier Hernandez saved 15, 6, and 6 games respectively, with even a young Sterling Hitchcock and an old, done Jeff Reardon chipping in with 2 saves a piece for the 1994 Yanks who finished first albeit in a strike-shortened season despite having no definitive closer.

    Then came John Wetteland in 1995-96, so it’s not like the Yanks haven’t had competent closers before Mo, it’s just been a loooong time since we’ve seen someone else close. Yes, I know ’96 Wetteland had ’96 Mo, but we’re talking closers here, not setup men. If D-Rob does his job as the closer but Sori/Wade/whoever blow as setup men, that’s not on D-Rob.

    We have to realize that a guy doesn’t have to be Mo or even anywhere close to being Mo to get it done / help win it all. Remember Braden Looper? He was a 3.68 ERA with 28 saves closer for the team that beat the Yanks in the 2003 World Series then helped the 83-win St.Louis Cardinals win the 2006 World Series as middle reliever performing about the same (3.57 ERA.) Granted Looper was 9.82 ERA AWFUL in the ’03 WS and nondescript in the ’06 WS but he helped the Marlins and Cardinals get there.

    No one will (ever) be as good as or better than Mo, at least not in our lifetimes, that’s a given, but look at it like this:

    We get to see the Yankees’ life after Mo a little less than a year sooner than we expected and Mo go on the comeback trail for 2013 as I can’t see him retiring from this unless he absolutely can’t do it anymore. And who’s to say if he comes back in 2013 be it the first game after the All-Star Break or he last game of the season or whatever it doesn’t compel him to come back in 2014? Look at Jamie Moyer. ‘Dude took off a year then came back at age 49. Granted he took off not got knocked out for the season in a horrific, freakish way, but if he can come back at age 49, I think Mo could at a younger age (albeit an old one.) Mo has the mental fortitude and inner calm to.

    I’m gonna go out on a limb and say D-Rob (if he is made the closer) is better than all those aforementioned pre-Mo guys including ’93 Farr save Wetteland, he could be as good as Wettleland, and I think D-Rob, Sori, Wade, and maybe small doses of Aardsma and Chamberlain if they can come back are better than the ’94 Yankees closer by committee. The Yanks still have a better closer than Red Sox and I think D-Rob could be better than Andrew Bailey and certainly Alfredo Aceves. He already is cuz he’s pitching and Bailey isn’t.

    The Yanks could move Hughes to the pen and see if he can help out close games and perhaps he thrives considering he is a two-pitch pitcher.

    NO TRADING FOR A CLOSER!!! The Yanks don’t need one much less need teams holding the Yanks for ransom. They have a guy with closer experience in Soriano and D-Rob has been under Mo’s tutelage for over four years now, has seen The Best There Ever Was/Will Be do the job and I really think Mo has rubbed off on him cuz D-Rob has grown immensely as not only a pitcher but as a person e.g. D-Rob’s High Socks For Hope Foundation I donated $30 to. Practically speaking, D-Rob costs only $1.6M and would still cost $11.8M less than 2012 Mo even if his salary doubles for 2013 (Mo’s $15M for 2012 salary – D-Rob’s $3.2M salary for 2013 if he was paid that.) Again, they could have Hughes and possibly Aardsma and/or Chamberlain pitch in. Hopefully this makes the rest of the bullpen tougher and stronger.

    Mo will be back next year even if it means he comes back in July, August, or September, and you better believe he will be on the Yankees postseason roster at the deadline it has to be set if he comes back and doesn’t throw a single pitch in a regular season game before that deadline. Like someone / many have said, no way he goes out like this.

    If anything, the 2012 Yanks should not panic, they should go for broke as they have nothing to lose. Perhaps this will help them in some weird way. If they don’t make the postseason, win the wildcard game, or get past the first round they could say it’s cuz they lost Mo on May 3rd. That sounds like an excuse, but that’s a pretty damn valid one considering what Mo has done for the Yanks since 1996. They have to look at themselves as overpaid underdogs. I don’t ever want to hear “The Yanks buy championships” again shit if they don’t make the postseason or they lose the wildcard game because all the money in the world means jack when you don’t have a closer who can get it done or one who can like Mo.

    Whoever the Yankees closer is as to go for broke and be himself, pitcher-wise. He should not think “I’m not Mo” or “I’m not Mo, I’m me.”, say “I’M ME AND PROUD OF IT. I’M THE MAN. I WILL GET IT DONE.” then get it done, no “I’ll do my best” crap.

    • Dan says:

      No one’s saying trade for a closer. Robertson will be fine, and there’s even a backup in Soriano.

    • Hells bells says:

      Nice write up. If Hughes goes to the pen, who replaces him in the rotation? Petite will take Phelps’ spot… Garcia? Are there any other options internally or do we look to trade?

      • jjyank says:

        I don’t think it’s a forgone conclusion that Pettitte takes Phelps’ spot. I think Phelps pitched well enough last night to earn another look, a look that will include a full pitch count and without first-MLB-start-in-front-of-his-family type nerves.

        Let’s see what Hughes and Phelps do in the next turn through the rotation.

    • OldYanksFan says:

      This isn’t about our closer.
      This isn’t about the Yankees… or baseball.
      This is about Mo.
      This is a loss that can’t be replaced in kind.

    • Joe Blow says:

      Duh Innings

      You seriously need to get a life of some kind if you can sit here and type all that garbage.

  8. Deen says:

    There are no words, only prayers. And I’m not even all that religious.

    • jayd808 says:

      You actually are, Deen. You belong to a community, you celebrate their memories and seek meaning in them. Alright, alright it’s not the Catholic Church and Jesus Christ but the NYY and Mariano Rivera says a lot about you. All of it good BTW.

  9. Mike MzX says:

    This is the most devastating Yankee moment of the past 30 years. Even the Red Sox comeback is nothing compared to losing Mo like this. Heartbroken.

    • Dan says:

      The last time I was this despondent about the Yankees was the 2001 World Series. Both times, I was reminded that the guy wearing 42 is fallible. There’s no worse feeling than having the aura of Mo shattered by something so mundane as fielding practice.

  10. Kevin says:

    I thought the worse video of Mo would be game 7 of 01. I thought wrong.
    Truly a horrible awful day.

  11. Andrew 518 says:

    We’ve taken some bad losses, I cried for Donnie (and myself) after they lost in 95′ but never in my life have I felt this broken up over an individual player. I’m just so sad. I wish “Freddie the Fan” was still around to sum my emotions in one concise sign. Just so sad.

  12. Mike Stanley says:

    I’m not ashamed to admit this made me cry.

    Strong men also cry. Strong men. Also. Cry.

  13. Tom Zig says:

    Worst loss ever? Worst loss ever.

    • OldYanksFan says:

      No. Munson was much worse. Munson was killed. He was the heart and soul of the team. There was video of a funeral. There were many men who were crying.

      I wasn’t around, but I imagine everyone cried when Lou Gehrig declared himself ‘the luckiest Man in the World’.

      But when it comes to loss from retirement, Mantle was the worst. Mickey’s loss was the loss of decades of dynasty. The loss of a generation of Yankee icons. The loss of the Yankee as a great team. In sports terms, it was quite literally, the loss or an era.

      In Mantle’s 18 years, he and the Yankees won 7 WSs.
      In the 28 years that followed, the Yankees won 2.

      But nonetheless, losing Mo this way is a horrible loss.
      Everytime we have the lead late in the game… we will remember… and feel the loss. It’s gonna be bad for a long time.

      • kenthadley says:

        agree…this is more a personal than on-field loss….in fact, it is an area of strength right now, so move everyone down one inning and insert Phil for 6/7….Pineda’s losss was more devastating for the team, since starting pitching has been weak…nobody replaces Mo, but several can save games at a good enough clip to be a playoff team…..of course it means little if the starting pitching doesn’t pick up, along with 3-4-5.

  14. ShouchBant says:

    It’s definitely gonna be tough on him waking up the next morning and realizing he won’t getting ready to play some baseball for quite some time.

    He’s definitely going to be contemplating retirement for a while. It may be a bit selfish of me, but I just hope something in the back of his mind tells him to pull through and try to get back on the mound again someday.

    A legend ends a story on his own terms.

  15. Brian says:

    Mo’s the best. I’m so sorry to see him hurt. Today is definitely worse than Game 7 in Arizona. Mo, thanks for the last 18 years. Take care of yourself and remember that we all love you.

  16. Rey22 says:

    Watching this was absolutely heartbreaking. I had to hold back the tears. Unreal.

  17. Ethan says:

    I feel like someone died :(

    • RetroRob says:

      Understandable, it’s sad, but no one has died. I was a Yankee fan when Thurman Munson died. There is no comparison.

      I’m going with the glass is half-full thought. Chipper Jones was getting ready to retire and then he tore his ACL and came back. He didn’t want to leave the game that way and put all that work for no reason. I’m hoping Mo feels the same and delays retirement one more year.

      • jjyank says:

        This. I am too young for Munson, but I agree with everything you said. If anyone can come back from this, it’s Mariano Fuckin’ Rivera.

      • rek4gehrig says:

        I agree. I was in shock but now I’m OK. Everything happens for a reason. I’ve got a peaceful, easy feeling about this.

  18. Doug says:

    There’s no way that the last time Mo leaves the field is being carted off.

    Right?

    Right?

    That’s what I’m trying to convince myself of :(

  19. RetroRob says:

    Has anyone checked in with John Wetteland lately to see what he’s up to?

    Random thoughts beyond general sadness. Sure, the Yankees do have a great replacement for Mo with D-Rob, but what they don’t have is a great replacement for D-Rob in the 8th. They can probably cover Mo, they can’t cover Robertson as easily. The bullpen is weaker.

    I’d rather they give Soriano a shot first as the clsoer simply because I think Robertson is more valuable as the bridge to…nowhere. He can pitch more than one inning, something Soriano won’t, providing greater flexibility, and he can continue to be used in higher leverage situations.

    Did Pettitte and Mo have a deal to try to win one more World Series together, which is why Andy returned? If so, odd timing that Andy will be arriving just as Mo is exiting.

    It might be more important now for Hughes to go to the pen.

    For all of you worried that the Yankees weren’t giving guys like Phelps and Mitchell and opportunity, well congratulations, your wish has come true.

  20. Mike Stanley says:

    I think Aardsma plays a role here once July comes around as another key piece.

    I know the sun will rise tomorrow. It’s just hard to understand that it will. Damn it. Why him?

    • JohnC says:

      forgot about Ardsma. Suddenly could be a key signing if Yanks can hold water til he is ready to help. Drob, Sori, Wade and Logan are gonna have to all step up. Maybe DJ Mitchell becomes an important piece to the pen also with his sinker and ability to get ground balls. Season is far from over.

    • jjyank says:

      Good point. Obviously losing Mo makes the bullpen much weaker, and even a good Aardsma won’t replace Mo, but at least there is a possible reinforcement on the way.

  21. First Time Poster says:

    I’m choked up over this… watching that man trying to hold back tears is unbearable. He just has so much love and passion for what he does… It’s not something anyone can explain with words. I am devastated at the moment; however, if we have seen the last of the sandman, it was one hell of dream. Thank you, Mariano… best wishes and good luck.

    • willx says:

      Don’t worry First Time Poster the yankees offense does it on a nightly basis, except without tears. Just another day playing some baseball for millions of dollars

  22. BigBlueAL says:

    This was so painful to watch.

  23. Mike Stanley says:

    One last thing: can you guys please keep Mariano on top of the Bullpen Workload chart?

    It just…he should be there. For some reason, I can’t explain it, but I feel like him not being there…

  24. NapLajoieOnSteroids says:

    Wow, there is something poetic about this. The natural, who woke up one day able to throw the greatest pitch in baseball history, being felled on a pre-game routine, on a ball hit by a guy called up to replace an injury. This is “fate” sorta stuff here. Even for the Great Rivera, the game tells you when to go; you don’t get to decide.

    This is surreal.

  25. stuart a says:

    he is the best ever. doubt he will ever be matched. great player, great teammate, and classy person. he had a great run, sad it had to end this way but time never stops. to pitch this long and so effective is just a once in a lifetime…

    robertson, soriano, and others will do fine. now they miss Joba big time..3 studs are better then 2…

    man cano needs to wake up. arod is just fading and texiera maybe the same…

  26. Kosmo says:

    Now it´s time Soriano earns his salary or at least part of it. Hughes in the 7th, Robertson in the 8th and Soriano closing. Sounds OK on paper.
    Pettitte takes Hughes place in the rotation.
    Yanks could be on the trade market for someone like Grant Balfour.
    I think NY can cover this without too much of a problem.

  27. Monterowasnotdinero says:

    It’s a problem but it would have happened after this year anyway and this is a great time of the year to develop the “new closer” without all the off season and ST buildup. KC on the road-what could be a better time? I am confident in DRob and Soriano. So many other teams have great closers who are not Mo-I actually think this is far less of a problem for the team than our aging bats and poor starting pitching.

  28. Guest says:

    I will not watch that video. Sorry. Can’t do it. Won’t do it. Does that make me pathetic? That I am a grown man with a wife, a kid, a real job, responsibilities, supposed perspective, etc., and I refuse to watch a video of baseball player talking because it will make me sad? It just might. Still can’t watch it.

    I read articles about just about everything that happens in the world of sports. I eventually even read articles about the Diamond Backs loss and the Sox collapse. I have not and will not read a single article about this.

    He was ready to retire. Go out on his own terms. He would have gotten the proper send off he deserved at YSIII for all the joy/comfort (comfort is probably the greatest gift a closer could ever provide to baseball fans and what we will miss the most) he provided to millions.

    And this is how it ends? Shagging balls in KC during BP. It’s like a corny, trite, 9th grade attempt at writing a story in the style of a Greek tragedy.

    I am much more sad for Mo, for his teammates, for us the fans, than I am worried about the fate of the Yankees on the field. They’ll be fine.

    But this isn’t how it was supposed to be. I guess TS Eliot was right. Not with a bang, but a whimper.

  29. Manny's BanWagon says:

    The Yankees have a deep pen and might be able to overcome the loss of Mo on the field but from a morale standpoint, from the reactions of Jeter and Arod, you can see how this could suck the life out of this team.

    It’s like they lost their heart and soul.

    Between Mo and Pineda with devastating injures, young rotation “cornerstones” Hughes and Nova stinking up the joint, Teix and Arod looking shot, Betances flaming out as a starter in AAA, Romine already out 2 months, this season has been a total fucking disaster

  30. Bye mo says:

    Hes staying w the team because he knows it’s the last time ever

  31. Clyde Barrow says:

    Girardi and Cashman have really destroyed what should have been a great final season for Mariano. They’ve made so many blunders this year that if anyone else made they’d be fired. And the team seems to be just going through the motions right not, not really caring if they win or lose. That’s a reflection on the manager. We might be able to win the next two games only because CC and Kuroda can hold the Royals to 2 runs or less. Anything more than that and the offense cannot prevail.

  32. Monterowasnotdinero says:

    Mowasapro.

    Sincerely,
    Monterowasdinero

  33. LarryM.,Fl. says:

    I just hope the Yankee front office does not over react to the situation with MO. I prefer to go internally with the fixes. Soriano and D-Rob are capable. No one is MO. So trading here there and anywhere is not the answer.

    This season has been and injury filled beginning. Swisher, Gardner, Romine’s injury causing Cervelli to AAA for depth reasons, Pineda, Chavez and MO. Coupled with the slow starts of Arod, Teix. and Cano. We worried about Arod and Jeter playing old. Well, we will see how the team reacts to the turmoil of the events. How the fans react to the team because the adjustment period may be uncomfortable to watch.

    We must remember its a game. Maybe just maybe there will be a silver lining in all this negativity. Some young pitcher developing or Nunez developing into a super sub. Oh well it will be interesting.

  34. Billion$Bullpen says:

    No team has ever been in a better position for replacing a closer even a guy that is doing as well as Mo currently is, and we can only deal with what is currently going on.

    Robertson is the real deal and has been BETTER than Mo for some time now. Soriano is also pretty darn good. Phil Hughes needs to be in the pen anyway. WE WILL BE FINE.

    Mo is one of my 5 favorite players ever. I hope he sees this as a sign from GOD to pitch again or whatever works for him.

    I just heard Buster Onley on NESPN say that its silly that people are critizing Mo shagging during BP and that he does not bang into walls and all that. I call BS on this. I have seen Mo dive into walls over and over in BP for years. I have also seen BP where he was much more reseverd. I always thought it was overkill on his part and also irresponsible given his importance on this team and in history. I am sure most will disagree with me on that, but I always had an issue with it. I think if Mo wanted to play OF he should have retired as a closer and try to play of or work out some deal in whatever was his last contract.

    Most of all I hope Mo gets better and has a happy life. Comes across as a very good guy, and has been great to watch all of these years.

    • YanksFan in MA says:

      He’s been doing it 20 years. It’s part of his routine. I don’t think anyone here would have wanted him to change his routine and get him out of what he feels comfortable doing. It’s just an unfortunate injury.

  35. pat says:

    If Jamie Moyer can undergo TJ in his late 40′s Mo can come back from this ish.

  36. Mike HC says:

    Terrible. Just terrible. Not the end of the world though.

  37. jjyank says:

    That was…depressing. Mo looks so sad.

    All we can do is hope that during his rehab, he becomes determined to retire on his own terms and pitch again.

  38. YankeesFaninNC says:

    I already posted this on another site. I hope that doesn’t violate terms or anything…but I wanted to share my thoughts and didn’t want to have to reword everything just for the sake of posting. So…here goes:

    The question that begs asking: Is this another example of the Yankees being unable to develop a quality starting pitcher?

    I jest, of course, but as a fan I am entirely too sad to write about this in too much of a serious light. I love the Yankees….and know his value to them both in terms of leadership and on the field performance…but those concerns seem like a mile away for me at the moment. Production can be replaced and role players will step up to be fill a void in leadership, so the Yankees will be fine on those two fronts. What bothers me most right now is the way that Mo makes the game looked so damned easy. He has always looked like he is just warming up…playing catch in the back yard….and doing what he loves. He is as competitive as a player can be, but he always looks like he is having fun and fully embracing the opportunity to be a man playing a boys game. THAT is what upsets me. THAT is why my heart aches. To me Mo has always been about much more than simple wins and losses, he was about the joy of the game. (Not trying to sound too sappy here, but he just made the game look so beautiful…in a way that no player that I have ever seen do.)

    And fan boys and girls….PLEASE don’t complain about him getting hurt while shagging balls in the outfield. He loved doing it…yes…but it also kept him in shape…competitive and probably even helped keep his stress level lower…so without shagging the flies in the first place..he may never have been the pitcher he has been.

    I hope to see him on the mound again in the future, but if I don’t, I thank him for all he has done for the Yankees and for the game in general.

    From the top of my keyboard….SWISH!!!

  39. Mike HC says:

    Am I the only one who isn’t that sad? I don’t wish injury on anyone, but Mo’s professional career has been pretty blessed. It seems like he might be able to come back from this too if he wants. The true blessing is that it had nothing to do with his arm or shoulder. Who knows, maybe in an alternative universe, if he didn’t hurt his leg, he would have hurt his shoulder this year or something.

    All in all, considering the Yanks bullpen depth, and the fact it isn’t an arm injury, it is really not the worst news. It will still be Mo’s decision if he wants to retire or continue pitching.

    • jjyank says:

      I mean….yeah, this is better than his shoulder blowing up, but it’s still pretty damn sad.

      I’m a glass half-full kind of guy, but I grew up with Mo. He’s literally my favorite pitcher ever. I’m finding optimism hard right now, but I hope more than anything that he is determined to not end his legacy like this.

      • Mike HC says:

        My optimism is that I don’t think this is career ending if he doesn’t want it to be. If he wants to retire, it will still be his decision.

        I guess we will know more in the coming days or weeks when we know the extent of the injury and the specific rehab time for him.

        • jjyank says:

          I agree, it’s not the end unless Mo wants it to be. I know he’s just really sad himself right now, so you have to take his answer to that question with a grain of salt, but he certainly didn’t sound like he was leaning that way at all. I really hope he does though.

          • Mike HC says:

            I mean, Junior Seau, 43, just killed himself, maybe partly due to the effects football had on his brain.

            Mo, 42, fucked his knee up and still can pitch if he wants.

  40. willx says:

    I’m not worried about it. @TheDA53 will be around eventually and so will joba, and hughes is a reliever, robertson as someone else has said, has been better than mo now for awhile, which is true. BUT THAT’S OK! It’s still mo! Regardless it doesn’t matter who your closer is, if you can’t score runs. It’s beyond refuckingtarded that the yankees are shitting the bed night after night as an offence. Nix??? Really????? How do you lose to a team of players that would most likely be in AAA in your farm system?

    • jjyank says:

      In all fairness, if that Royal team was actually on our AAA team, they would make the Charlestown team look like the Mexican Leagues. Meaning, they haven’t all broken out yet, but there is a lot of talent on that team.

  41. Bartolo's Colon says:

    this is very sad. i truly hope he does come back next year, but I’m not expecting it. by far he is my favorite yankee. i was at the game on friday, and i don’t want that to be the last time i see him in action. i purposely bought tickets to the last home game of the year so that I could catch his send off.

  42. willx says:

    I love mo, but really mo? Do you need to dive for balls in pregame? Catching fly balls is one thing… running after a ball hit over your head towards the wall/warning track… yeah no. Please don’t.

    • jjyank says:

      I don’t think he dove…looked to me he jumped and just caught a lip on the edge of the grass and warning track.

      If you told a professional athlete that jogging and jumping 3 inches into the air was too dangerous, he’d probably just laugh. I don’t think there’s any blame to be assigned here, it was a freak accident. It really, really, sucks, but blaming Mo does not help.

      • Mike HC says:

        To be fair, I wouldn’t call what Mo did “jogging and jumping 3 inches.” He was straight making plays at the wall. There is a reason Bobby Abreu refused to get 10 ft of that thing, ha.

        • jjyank says:

          Okay, running and jumping 5 inches? My point is that it wasn’t a dive, and had his knee not given out, he may not have even hit the wall. I don’t think it was as reckless as willx is implying.

          • Mike HC says:

            All I’m saying is that Bobby Abreu wouldn’t have even attempted to make that play if it was in a game, ha.

            I have no problem with Mo taking flyballs. He loves the sport and pitching one inning every 3 games was no enough for him. I like shagging fly balls too and sometimes probably go too hard as well.

            • jjyank says:

              Well Abreu was always a bad defender for that reason. I just don’t think that any professional baseball player would consider shagging fly balls to be dangerous or reckless. So what if he was running towards the wall? The wall is not what injured him.

              • Mike HC says:

                I’m not looking to argue. Nobody is happy obviously. Shitty day.

                • jjyank says:

                  Sorry, I guess I’m just feeling defensive and bitter this morning.

                  • Mike HC says:

                    Yea, I think everyone is trying to rationalize it in their own way. It really is such a shock.

                    I guess I like to look at things like, “well, it could be a lot worse.” It could be his arm. Even if he does retire, he played a sport that allowed him to play until he was 42 without brain injuries like a football player has.

                    • jjyank says:

                      Yeah I know it could be worse. And I know Mo can come back if he chooses. I just hope that’s what he chooses.

                      Mo could easily look at this in two different ways:

                      1. I can’t go out like this. The team, the fans, and myself deserve for me to go out on top, on my own terms.

                      2. Maybe this is a sign that it’s time for me to hang ‘em up.

                      Mo’s line in the video about “everything happens for a reason” and how religious he is leads me to believe that #2 is a definite possible perspective.

                      As a fans, all we can do is wait and hope that Rivera feels like the former.

                    • Mike HC says:

                      Definitely. If I had to guess, I would say he is going to retire. Maybe he pulls a Pettitte though too two years from now?

    • OldYanksFan says:

      Watch the film numbnuts. He didn’t dive. He didn’t leap. He didn’t hit the wall. He wan’t running full out. It was a play he has probably literally made DOZENS of times over the years.

      It was a freak accident.
      There is no explaination.
      There is no blame.
      You simply can’t predict Baseball.

  43. Jeff says:

    Sitting here looking at my Yankees calendar which ironically has Mo’s picture for May as he made his 602nd save.

    I keep saying to myself, they can fix him he will be fine. They will fix him… It’s just a knee, he doesn’t have to run much, his arm is still good… He will be fine…

  44. Bavarian Yankee says:

    Everything sucks right now. It’s still early but this season could get ugly and the bad news just keep on coming.

  45. Stevis says:

    And now Yankee fans…..We will see if our guys have a set of Balls…..Cream rises to the top

  46. Mike HC says:

    I just saw the video of the play. How can we not blame ARod? ha … But seriously, ARod honestly looked sick to his stomach when he saw Mo went down.

  47. Okyankee24 says:

    The day the music died..

  48. jjyank says:

    If I’m looking for a personal silver lining…I do have Robertson on my fantasy team, so maybe I’ll start getting some saves out of him?

    I feel dirty for thinking that.

  49. SMK says:

    I can’t watch that video. No f’ing way.

    • jjyank says:

      I don’t blame you. I did watch it, and I think all I accomplished was starting my day off on an even more sour note.

  50. JohnC says:

    Bad news all around. MO, Yanks lose the game, and I saw on twitter that Jose Campos has gone on the DL. DOn’t know whats up with him yet. Hopefully not an arm injury

  51. mustang says:

    Really sad, but life happens to sit here and try to place blame on people is almost disrespecting what the guy stood for.

    Mo feels like he let the team down and he is going to stay around to make sure their ok that’s a leader.

    We Yankees fans live larger we enjoy the most successful organization in the game with most limitless resources. Instead of blaming everyone and crying unfair like Mets fans or looking at curses like Red Sox fans did for so long lets deal and move on. The 2012 Yankees still are an excellent team and at the end none of the haters will ever shed a tear for the Evil Empire.

  52. OMG! Bagels! says:

    I remember Munson dying though I was just a kid. The fans were devastated. It was so horrible. It seems so far away now but it was horrible.

    Right now, I feel sad for Mo the man. My sadness has to do with him and not the team. I’m sure it is devastating for him. I doubt anyone would have stayed and answered questions the way he did after Game 7 2001. He wouldn’t leave until all questions were answered. And here he is saying he wants to stay with the team and be there for the guys. BE THERE FOR THE GUYS!!!! The guys better start manning up because they need to learn to be there for themselves.

    I was ready to savor every single Enter Sandman this year knowing they could be the last time I saw him. Enter Sandman is always one of my favorite parts of being at a Yankee game.

    But when all is said and done, it’s a privilege and an honor to have been there to see the greatest closer of all time play in as many games as I’ve seen. No drama with the man. Just high class, precision and dedication.

    I hope he comes back. On his own terms. He’ll know before he steps out on the field whether he’s ready and if he decides he’s not, then I thank him for all these years.

  53. jjyank says:

    Man 2012 is like the curse of the closers, huh? Madson, Soria, Wilson, Bailey, and now Mo? The baseball gods are not pleased with closers right now.

    • Bartolo's Colon says:

      maybe they are pissed at how managers are using them. or maybe this is their way of saying get rid of the save?!?!

  54. mike says:

    its amazing that on a site where non-savvy ZIPS/WAR etc fans often get pummeled for watching the game and offering their opinions, how a guy who contributes such a small amount to the overall team’s WAR (almost equivalent to that of Anrduw Jones last year, for instance)in a position where the success rate between ordinary and excellence is statistically very small is now appreciated to mean to the overall success of the team.

    • jjyank says:

      I think it’s because Mo is more than just a closer to this team. He’s a symbol, an icon, and a leader. He represents the 90′s dynasty teams, he represents class and integrity. Mo has never been involved in a controversy, he has always represented the Yankees in a classy way.

      This isn’t like the Reds losing Madson, the Giants losing Wilson, the Red Sox losing Bailey, or the Royals losing Soria.

      Everyone knew Posada was done last year and his skills had declined. But we were all still sad to actually see him retire. Similarly, regardless of Mo’s WAR calculations, he means much more to this team than a few sabermetric stats. Stat-head or not, I think most of you will agree with me.

    • Dan says:

      Rivera’s stability at his position saved the team from a lot of drama, especially in the bullpen. They didn’t need to trade away talent to get a closer, or convert a promising starter into a closer — there was Mo. Look at the Yankee locker room after this game and tell me his on-field impact is minimal. This is like losing a parent.

  55. Ghost of Kim Jones says:

    NOOOOO MY CHILDHOOD!!!!!!!

  56. Kevin says:

    Having reading the O’s forum yesterday and today,I never EVER want to hear them complain about us disrespecting them ever again.

  57. Joel_W says:

    Didn’t find out about Mo’s injury till I left work last night at 10 pm. Just a crushing blow, one that will surely be the hardest injury to over come this year. I’m more of a the glass is half empty then full type of guy, but I really think that we’ll see Mo back on the mound to close out more games come 2013, that will certainly be his last year.

  58. rek4gehrig says:

    He’ll be back. I know he will. For one last dance :-)

  59. chrisginn says:

    Dear Mo,
    Get better, heal up. Hopefully you’ll be able to rehab and travel with the team this year and be their reminder of what class and dignity and professionalism is, and also a reminder to the team not to quit on the season or use your injury as an excuse for not executing and winning.

    I hope to see you on the field again but if not I know that we were the luckiest fans in the world for having you on our team for so long.

    Good luck to D-Rob and Soriano in the 9th innings. Good luck to our starting pitchers – they need to man up and get through 6 or 7 innings on their own – and that means you too Hughes – man up!!! And good luck to our offense – Tex, A-Rod, Cano, Jeter, Martin, Gardner, Swisher, et al – time to take it to the next level.

  60. handtius says:

    that completely killed me.

  61. Larry Evans says:

    Aside from August 2nd. 1979 ….. This is by far the saddest of Yankee days I have EVER experienced……..

  62. Mike says:

    I am a Red Sox fan but just wanted to say how sorry I am. I have always enjoyed watching Mo pitch even though it usually meant we were going to lose the game. He is the games greatest closer as well as a great human being. I do hope he can come back. But if not he will definitely be missed by true baseball fans everywhere…

  63. Daniel says:

    All Panamanians are very proud of your. You are one of the greatest yankees ever. You will be back. Animo Mariano

  64. Rocco G. Perna says:

    Mo, God Speed to you…I hope 1st for your complete return to health…Then if you desire to return for your farewell season…Either way You are a Class act…Arguably one of the classiest Yankees ever (Along with Gehrig and Maris) and of course a Once in a Generation Athlete…and The Greatest Closer ever…

    May the Lord continue to bless you and yours…You are a humble Christian man and a true role-model…Thank you for all you have done!

  65. FreeAgentSignee says:

    Get well Mo!

Leave a Reply

You may use <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong> in your comment.

If this is your first time commenting on River Ave. Blues, please review the RAB Commenter Guidelines. Login for commenting features. Register for RAB.