2011 Draft: Yanks reach agreement with Hayden Sharp, sign Bubba Jones

Update (August 2nd): Sharp’s bonus is around $200,000 according to Levine-Flandrup, which is pretty damn cheap for a high school kid that’s shown 98 this spring. Apparently the contract was being finalized today.

Original Post (July 28th): Via K. Levine-Flandrup, the Yankees have reached an agreement with 18th round pick Hayden Sharp. The deal is still pending a physical and could be finalized within two weeks, but Sharp is expected to get some innings in with the Rookie level GCL Yankees this year. A high school right-hander from Oklahoma, Sharp was a late-spring pop-up guy this year and Keith Law reported in May that he was pitching at 93-96 with some 98’s. A quarterback recruit for Central Oklahoma, Sharp will certainly get an above-slot signing bonus.

Meanwhile, Levine-Flandrup also reports that the Yankees have signed seventh rounder Bubba Jones for an overslot bonus of $350,000. Jones, whose real first name is Austin, was considered the best high school bat in the northwest by Baseball America (subs. req’d) before the draft. His long-term position is unclear (likely first base, though he did some catching in high school), but the lefty swinger is said to have a “short, swing with strong wrists” and “good bat speed.” Jones is heading to the GCL. You can see all of the Yankees’ signed picks here.

Game 108: Two-thirds

(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

This game is number 108 of the season, exactly two-thirds of the way through. The old saying is that you use the first half of the season to evaluate the team, the second third to make changes, and the third third to ride those changes out. The Yankees chose to make no changes in the second third (or minimal changes, really), which is why Phil Hughes‘ start tonight is so important. Joe Girardi indicated that they won’t continue using a six-man rotation this month, and Hughes’ spot is clearly the one most up in the air. A poor performance could land him in the bullpen or in Triple-A, but a good one … could do something else. I dunno what. Here’s the lineup…

Derek Jeter, SS
Curtis Granderson, CF
Mark Teixeira, 1B
Robinson Cano, 2B
Nick Swisher, RF
Andruw Jones, DH
Russell Martin, C
Eduardo Nunez, 3B
Brett Gardner, LF

Phil Hughes, SP

Apparently the weather in Chicago is supposed to be bad, so a delay or postponement is a possibility. The game is supposed to start a little after 8pm ET and can be seen on YES. Enjoy.

Update: There is “severe weather” on the way, so the game will begin in a delay. They’ll reevaluate things at 7:45pm CT, so we’re probably looking at a 9:30pm ET start at the earliest.

Update Part Deux: They’re saying a 8:55pm ET start, so my estimation skills suck.

2011 Draft: 44th round pick Adam Ravenelle heading to college

Via the kid himself, Yankees’ 44th round pick Adam Ravenelle will not sign and instead follow through on his commitment to Vanderbilt. Ravenelle, a high school right-hander from Massachusetts, was not a 44th round talent. Baseball America (subs. req’d) said he might have the highest ceiling of anyone in the state thanks to a “6-foot-4, 185-pound build” with a fastball “in the low 90s.” Vandy is a high-end program and has traditionally been a tough school to buy kids away from, so this wasn’t unexpected.

All of the Yankees picks (signed and unsigned) can be seen here.

Yankees were close to trading Cervelli to Pittsburgh

Via George King, the Yankees were close to trading backup backstop Frankie Cervelli to the Pirates for right-hander Brad Lincoln recently, presumably sometime over the weekend. “It was very close but [we] couldn’t agree on the value of the players,” said King’s source. The move would have freed up a roster spot for Jesus Montero, but alas, we’ll have to wait. Brian Cashman told King that it’s “possible” Montero could join the team before September call-ups, which I guess qualifies as “in the near future.” Adam Warren and George Kontos were also mentioned as “possible” call-up candidates.

Lincoln, 26, was the fourth overall pick in the 2006 draft, but injuries (specifically Tommy John surgery) have hindered his development. His big league career consists of a 5.25 FIP in 58.2 IP, though he’s performed quite well in Triple-A. Baseball America ranked him as the Pirates’ fourth best prospect prior to the 2010 season, saying he “has two plus  pitches, a 90-93 mph fastball that reaches 95 with good late life and a curveball that breaks big and late.”

Measuring Jorge Posada’s Bat Speed*

(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

* Disclaimer: I did not actually measure Jorge Posada‘s bat speed.

We’re almost exactly two-thirds of the way through the season now, and it’s painfully obvious at this point that Posada is pretty much done. I love Jorge, I think he’s one of the greatest Yankees of all-time and one of the most underrated players of the last 15 years, but he’s been an offensive black hole for most of the season. Yes, he’s hitting a respectable .285/.347/.405 since May 17th (when he pulled himself out of the lineup), but that’s buoyed by a three-week hot streak immediately following the incident. Posada is hitting .252/.310/.388 over the last seven weeks and .236/.318/.382 on the season. That’s a .307 wOBA and a .146 ISO, easily the lowest marks of his career (not counting his injury plagued 2008 season).

Although his .269 BABIP is low (.316 career), there’s been a pretty drastic shift in his batting ball profile leading to the drop. His line drive rate is just 16.7%, down from 20.8% from 2008-2010 and his lowest since the data started being recorded in 2002. A 45.2% ground ball rate (his highest since 2004) and an utter lack of speed will also contribute to a lower than usual BABIP. Also, man just watch the games. Jorge doesn’t hit the ball with much authority these days. He hasn’t hit a ball out of the park in over a month and has just three homers since late-April, almost 90 team games. At 39 years old (40 in two weeks) and with all those years of catching on his body, frankly it’s a miracle Posada stayed as productive as long he did.

Thanks to this post over at Getting Blanked, I found out that Hit Tracker records “ball off the bat” speed for all homeruns. That’s pretty amazing, and I wish they had it for all batted balls, but I don’t want to sound greedy. One day we’ll have that data, maybe. Anyway, the table on the right shows Posada’s various ball of the bat speeds through the years. Remember, it’s just homeruns, so we’re talking about pretty small samples. In fact, he hit just three homers in 2008 because of the shoulder injury, so you can probably just disregard that year.

The data is pretty consistent from year to year, averaging right around 105 mph and topping out at north of 110 mph pretty much each year. It’s dropped off this year, about four miles an hour on average. His maximum ball off the bat speed this year is short of his averages for the last four years. Although this is just homeruns (all nine of ‘em in 2011), it’s does support the claim that Posada just isn’t hitting the ball with much authority these days, a claim also supported by his declining line drive rate and the eye test. Less hard contact is a symptom of declining bat speed, so the title isn’t that erroneous.

Had Posada not been “Jorge Posada, All-Time Yankee Great,” he would have been jettisoned many moons ago. He’s basically a switch-hitting version of 2007 Josh Phelps this season, a sometimes first baseman/sometimes DH/emergency catcher that can’t really hit (Phelps hit .263/.330/.363 as a Yankee, better than what Posada is going this year). Phelps was cut in mid-June that year, but Posada met no such fate. Despite his utter luck of offensive production at a position designed only to produce offense, it looks like Jorge will spend the rest of the year with the Yankees before being put out to pasture after the season. The signs of decline are obvious though, and I didn’t need to look at the speed of the ball of his bat to tell you that.