Robbie, Phil power Yanks to 11-5 win

Before the Tigers came to town, the Yanks had been scuffling through August, and even after Monday’s tough loss, the Bombers’ fearsome offense had managed just one run over its previous 18 innings. Bad pitching though is the cure for what ails you, and powered by a Derek Jeter triple and a Robinson Cano home run, the Yanks sent 13 hitters to the plate in the sixth inning en route to an 11-5 blowout win. Over their last three games, the team has scored 26 runs or as many as they had plated in their eight prior contests.

Phil’s early troubles and late domination

AP Photo, Kathy Willens

The tale of Thursday afternoon will be about the offense, but Phil Hughes‘ pitching is what stole the show. He didn’t open the game sharp as Will Rhymes knocked a one-out hit, and Miguel Cabrera bombed a 3-2 hanging curve ball into the Yanks’ bullpen. It took him 24 pitches to get through the top of the first, and with the sun pounding down on the stadium, it seemed as though Hughes would not be long for the game. A 20-pitch second inning didn’t help the cause.

But Hughes found his rhythm and his command. After the first nine hitters knocked out seven foul balls with two strikes and after the Tigers had a good look at the Yanks’ youngster, Hughes settled down. He needed just seven pitches to dispatch the top of the Detroit order in the third, 14 in the fourth, 11 in the fifth and just eight in his sixth and final frame. He threw 61 of 84 pitches for strikes with six Ks en route to his 15th win of the year. It was a very solid start for Hughes.

The right-hander’s innings limit came into play this afternoon too. Once the Yankees scored nine runs in the 6th, it seemed a fait accompli that Hughes would see no more action. The score stood at 11-2, and the Yanks had spent 34 minutes at the plate. So Hughes, on a roll through six, would see no more action, and his innings would be saved for another day. It was an obvious and wise decision by the Yanks.

So many runs in the sixth

Robinson Cano, do you know him? Credit: AP Photo, Kathy Willens

As a spectator, innings such as the sixth are a sheer pleasure to watch. Throughout the first third of the game, the Yanks’ bat had been dreadfully silent. Rick Porcello needed just 43 pitches to get through the first three innings, and the Yanks didn’t knock out a hit until Mark Teixera singled in the fourth. Three more hits that inning plated two runs for the Yanks, and with the score knotted at two, Teixeira came to bat to start the sixth. The merry-go-round would not stop for 13 batters.

Walk, double, walk, single, walk, wild pitch, double, ground-out, walk, triple, ground out, home run, walk, ground out. 34 minutes, 13 batters, nine runs, six hits. It was a thing of beauty, capped by an Austin Kearns double, Derek Jeter’s triple off the wall and a towering Robinson Cano home run into Monument Park, his second extra-base hit of the inning.

The Tigers needed four pitchers to get through that mess, each worse than the last, and for the Yankees, it seemed as though the great offensive dam had broken. After nearly a week or just a hit or two with runners in scoring position, the team went 6 for 10 in those situations, and the early August slump seemed to be but a memory. For the Yanks, only Brett Gardner and Ramiro Pena did not get base hits.

A save to end all saves

This actually happened. Photo by Amanda Rykoff

With the score at 11-2 and Phil Hughes in showers, the Yanks handed the ball over to the only reliever who didn’t appear in Wednesday’s game. By hook or by crook, Sergio Mitre would finish up the final three innings of an 11-2 game and finish it he did. I will charitably say that Mitre pitched to the score.

He started his appearance out on a high end, striking out Johnny Damon. Jhonny Peralta, though, took Mitre deep, and while the crowd groaned, I appreciated Mitre’s willingness to throw strikes. After a single and a double though, Sergio needed to do something. Dan Kelly struck out, and then Austin Jackson knocked in a run. After a mound visit from Dave Eiland, Mitre got Will Rhymes to fly-out to end the 7th.

The Tigers plated a run in the top of the 8th to pull with six, but by then, the regulars had long since departed. Miguel Cabrera, Yankee killer, was off for the rest of the day, and a variety of other Tigers popped in for a cameo. Mitre settled down and induced two double plays over the final two frames. It was, as the stadium scoreboard proudly, broadcast his first career save and the Yanks’ 75th win of the season.

The Box Score

Is nice. I like. Fan Graphs/ESPN

Up Next

The Cliff Lee-less Mariners come to town, but they’re coming out with guns blazing tonight. Felix Hernandez, 1-5 but with a minuscule 1.93 ERA since the Infamous Joba Meltdown in Seattle, will face off against A.J. Burnett at 7:05 p.m. King Felix’s last start in New York was a dominant one.

Christian sets a record among several pro debuts

Fourth rounder Mason Williams, who received the largest signing bonus given out by the Yankees this year, will make his pro debut with the GCL Yanks tomorrow. Meanwhile, 15-year-old righty Luis Heredia signed with the Pirates for big bucks, so the Yanks lost out on him. Oh well, not the end of the world. Remember Michael Ynoa?

Oh, and both Corban Joseph and Austin Romine are headed to the Arizona Fall League.

  • Triple-A Scranton won. Jorge Vazquez, Brandon Laird, and Colin Curtis each doubled, but the really star of he offense was Chad Huffman. Dude picked up three hits including a homer. David Phelps was rather ordinary, allowing seven hits and five runs in six innings of work.
  • Double-A Trenton won. Justin Christian reached base three times and stole three bases, setting the franchise’s all time record with his 103rd steal. Congrats to him. Dan Brewer and Austin Romine went hitless in a combined eight at-bats, but both Marcos Vechionacci and Luis Nunez went deep. D.J. Mitchell continued his strong pitching, allowing two runs while striking out a half-dozen in 6.1 IP.
  • High-A Tampa won. Jose Pirela, the man with three total homeruns since 2007, went deep twice in this one. What’s that thing they always say? Bradley Suttle, Zoilo Almonte, and Myron Leslie also went yard. Dellin Betances struck out six in just four innings, and was sitting 94-95.
  • Low-A Charleston lost. Slade Heathcott singled once, J.R. Murphy twice. And that’s all the team got on offense. Not exciting on the pitching side, though Jose Quintana is up from the GCL and started.
  • Short Season Staten Island lost. Casey Stevenson doubled and homered. Cito Culver did not play, but Rob Segedin picked up a pair of hits including a double. Gary Sanchez DH’d and singled in five at-bats. 12th rounder Dan Burawa made his pro debut, walking one in an otherwise scoreless inning.
  • Rookie GCL Yanks won. Second rounder Angelo Gumbs made his pro debut at shortstop and as a leadoff hitter, going hitless in three at-bats with a strikeout. There are questions about his ability to play short long-term, but it’s worth trying. Tenth rounder Ben Gamel also made his pro debut, picking up a single in three trips to the plate while playing right. Ramon Flores had three hits while Fu-Lin Kuo and Anderson Feliz each went deep. Some guy named George Isabel, a 6-foot-6 20-year-old righty from NYC made his pro debut with a scoreless inning. He must have signed as an undrafted free agent.

Open Thread: Back in the saddle again

Now, that’s more like. Powered by a nine-run sixth innings, the Yankees confidently downed the Tigers this afternoon 11-5 to win their first series since downing Cleveland in late July. At the least, the Bombers will maintain their share of first place and could move into sole possession of the AL East lead if the Rays lose against the A’s tonight.

We’ll have more on the game later tonight, but for now, let’s bask in the glow of an offensive explosion. Before we jump into the fun of the Open Thread, I’d like to take care of a few housekeeping items. First, please note the addition to the commenting guidelines. We are respectfully requesting that game threads and open threads remain somewhat focused on baseball and that political discussion of the kind that inspires rancorous and often bitter debate on the Internet remain in the Off Topic Thread.

Second, we had a busy news day as the Yanks were going about their business this afternoon. Roger Clemens is facing an indictment alleging that he perjured himself when he testified to Congress in 2008 on his use of PEDs. On the field, Alfredo Aceves is almost ready to return to the Bronx.

Finally, allow me to plug our social networking. You can follow River Ave. Blues and its three writers on Twitter at the following accounts: @RiverAveBlues, @bkabak, @joepawl and @mikeaxisa. Find us also on Facebook where we send photos, videos and pithy Yankee-related status messages to your News Feed.

Das it. The Red Sox, 9-0 against Los Angeles this year, play the Angels, and the game should air on MLB Network this evening. The alternate in some areas is the Phillies/Giants NL Wild Card showdown. San Francisco starters haven’t won a game in 15 tries. The Patriots and Falcons square off in some pre-season football action at 8 p.m. on FOX; the Rays play the A’s tonight at 10:10 p.m.; and of course, Jersey Shore, the pinnacle of American culture, is new this evening as well.

The photo of Derek Jeter awkwardly congratulating Robinson Cano on the latter’s two-run home run comes to us via the Kathy Willens of the Associated Press.

Aceves not yet ready to rejoin the Yankees

Shortly before the game, work leaked out that Alfredo Aceves was alive and well and in the Yankee clubhouse. I had fleeting thoughts that he would be activated after a lengthy stint on the DL due to back problems, and we would be saved more appearances by Chad Gaudin (or Sergio Mitre). The Yankees, however, have different plans. As’s Tim Britton reported, Brian Cashman is not quite ready to activate Aceves yet, and the team hopes to have him make at least one more rehab start and possibly two. “He’s a guy that’s just knocking out the rust,” Cashman said before the game. “The belief is he’d benefit and therefore we’d benefit from him getting a few more outings.”

So far, in 5 innings for AAA Scranton and AA Trenton, Aceves, who may still need surgery this winter, has looked sharp. He’s allowed a run on one hit while striking out six. Although Aceves may be ready to go, the Yankees are probably trying to stretch out his rehab to maintain some roster flexibility. By holding him back until September 1, the Yankees can activate Aceves without having to sacrifice Gaudin’s or Mitre’s spot on the Major League. Since Aceves’ back appears to be a ticking time bomb, keeping those two sacrificial lambs around gives the Yanks some depth during the pennant drive.

Roger Clemens under indictment perjury

Clemens testifies in front of Congress on February 13, 2008. The indictment stems from his testimony that day. Credit: AP Photo, Pablo Martinez

Update (5:25 p.m.): A federal grand jury has filed an indictment against former Yankee pitcher Roger Clemens facing a federal indictment for perjury in connection with his 2008 testiomy to the U.S. Senate. The 19-page indictment, unveiled today, charges the disgraced hurler with three counts of making false statements and two counts of perjury. While the Department of Justice will not seek to arrest Clemens, the Rocket’s legal troubles are just beginning.

Michael S. Schmidt of The Times has more details on the incidents out of which the indictment arises:

Clemens’s allegedly false testimony came in a public hearing in which Clemens and his former trainer Brian McNamee, testifying under oath, directly contradicted each other about whether Clemens had used the banned substances.

“Americans have a right to expect that witnesses who testify under oath before Congress will tell the truth,” United States Attorney Ronald C. Machen Jr. said in a statement announcing the indictment. “Our government can not function if witnesses are not held accountable for false statements made before Congress. Today the message is clear: if a witness makes a choice to ignore his or her obligation to testify honestly, there will be consequences.”

The congressional hearing at the heart of the indictment came just two months after McNamee first tied Clemens to the use of the substances in George J. Mitchell’s report on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. After Mitchell released the report, Clemens claimed McNamee made up the allegations.

Clemens joins Barry Bonds as the two most prominent former players to face perjury charges in connection with statements concerning PED use. Bonds is scheduled to go to trial in March, and the two will appear together on the 2013 Hall of Fame ballot.

The Feds, as Schmidt reports, investigated Clemens after Congressional leaders raised concerns over his testimony. Still, there are elements of a witch hunt here as Congress and the Justice Department have gone after only the two biggest names to be accused of drug use. If convicted, Clemens could face a sentence of 15-21 months, but my guess is that this case doesn’t get that far. Because Clemens allegedly never failed a drug test, the government’s evidence rests on the testimony of Brian McNamee, a former Clemens confidante who turned informant to avoid federal drug charges. McNamee claims to have old syringes that reportedly tested positive for both steroids and Clemens’ DNA.

The Rocket this afternoon issued a statement via Twitter denying the charges. “I never took HGH or Steroids,” he said. “And I did not lie to Congress. I look forward to challenging the Governments accusations, and hope people will keep an open mind until trial. I appreciate all the support I have been getting. I am happy to finally have my day in court.”

Click through for an embedded copy of the indictment, courtesy of Maury Brown’s Biz of Baseball. The unnamed Strength Coach #1 is widely believed to be Brian McNamee. [Read more…]

Game 121: Three out of four is always nice

It’s a getaway day for the visiting team, which means we’ll play a matinee. I suppose this means lots of Gameday and radio followers. That’s always fun.

There’s not much to say before this one that we haven’t already said. Eduardo Nunez is with the team, replacing the injured Lance Berkman. A-Rod remains on the shelf, though the move to bring up Nunez, I would think, means he’ll be back and at DH in a day or so.


1. Brett Gardner, LF — seems he’s comfortable in this spot
2. Derek Jeter, SS
3. Mark Teixeira, 1B
4. Robinson Cano, 2B
5. Nick Swisher, RF
6. Jorge Posada, C
7. Curtis Granderson, CF
8. Austin Kearns, DH
9. Ramiro Pena, 3B

And on the mound, number sixty-five, Phil Hughes.

Eduardo Nunez is in New York

Chad Jennings hit us with a surprise this morning: Eduardo Nunez is in the clubhouse. That undoubtedly means he’ll be activated before the game. That brings into question the corresponding roster move. By all appearances Lance Berkman is headed to the disabled list. He hasn’t played since he hurt his ankle on Sunday, and his name is not listed on the lineup card as a bench player. Nunez gives the Yanks a bit more flexibility in the infield as A-Rod heals.

The good news, then, is that it’s not A-Rod to the DL. While I don’t think that putting A-Rod on the shelf for two weeks would be the worst thing, a DL move itself would be troubling considering the circumstances. At first his calf injury was not serious and that no tests were scheduled. No tests scheduled, of course, means tests were scheduled. That revealed a Grade 1 strain, which is not serious. But if they placed him on the DL it would indicate that A-Rod’s injury is a bit more severe than they’ve let on.

Berkman’s DL trip will be retroactive to Monday, so he’ll be eligible to come off the DL just as rosters expand. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Yanks give him the extra two days and activate him on the first.