Jeremy Bleich hasn’t pitched since October 24th, not sure what that’s about. Maybe he had that inevitable elbow operation.

AzFL Peoria (11-4 loss to Surprise)
Kevin Russo: 1 for 4, 1 2B, 2 RBI, 1 K – hitting streak is up to 15 games
Humberto Sanchez: 1 IP, zeroes, 1 WP, 1 HB, 2-1 GB/FB – only 6 of 11 pitches were strikes (54.5%)

HWB Waikiki (11-1 loss to North Shore)
Austin Romine: 1 for 4, 1 RBI, 1 BB, 1 K – just 5 for his last 29 (.172) … too many Mai Tai’s I guess…
Andrew Brackman: 3.1 IP, 3 H, 7 R, 7 ER, 7 BB, 6 K, 2 WP, 1-2 GB/FB - just 41 of 84 pitches were strikes (48.8%) … damn, he’s a bust this week … it’s a good thing winter ball stats aren’t meaningful

Tuesday’s Games

AzFL Peoria (9-3 loss to Scottsdale)
Austin Jackson: 0 for 4, 2 K
Kevin Russo: 1 for 3, 1 R, 1 HR, 1 RBI, 1 BB, 1 K – if nothing else, at least he’ll be going into 2009 with a ton of confidence
Kevin Whelan: 1.2 IP, 1 H, 1 R, 0 ER, 1 BB, 4 K, 0-1 GB/FB – 19 of 34 pitches were strikes (55.9%)

HWB Waikiki (8-6 win over North Shore)
Damon Sublett & Austin Romine: both 1 for 4, 1 R, 1 2B, 1 RBI

Monday’s Games

AzFL Peoria (5-3 loss to Surprise)
Kevin Russo: 2 for 5, 1 R, 1 RBI, 1 E (fielding)
Austin Jackson: 1 for 4, 1 K, 1 SB
Phil Hughes: 5 IP, 1 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 8 K, 0-7 GB/FB – 41 of 59 pitches were strikes (69.5%) … phew, he’s not a bust this week … it’s a good thing winter ball stats are so meaningful

HWB Waikiki had a scheduled off day.

Sunday’s Games

AzFL Peoria had a scheduled off day.

HWB Waikiki beat West Oahu 6-5, but no Yanks’ farmhands played in the game.

Categories : Down on the Farm
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  • Yanks still interested in Cameron?
    By

    This one’s coming a bit late, but that’s because we have so many other damn rumors to share. Plus, we like the idea of Nick Swisher much more. Anyway, Anthony DiComo, writing for MLB.com’s Hot Stove Blog, reports that the Yankees have contacted the Brewers regarding a trade for Mike Cameron which would center around Melky Cabrera. I’m not sure who else would be involved in the trade. Despite Cameron’s disproportional $10 million salary, I have a hard time believing Doug Melvin would trade him for Melky Cabrera straight up. While Cameron would be a short-term upgrade in center, it’s difficult to evaluate this proposal without knowing the other players involved. · (89) ·

At MLBTR last night, Tim linked to a post by Ken Davidoff – blogging MVP of the GM Meetings – mentioning that the Yanks & ChiSox have had “extremely preliminary” talks about former Moneyball draft pick Nick Swisher. The soon-to-be 28 yr old is coming off the poorest season of his young career, a season in which he hit just .219-.332-.410 in nearly 500 at-bats. With strong competition expected for Mark Teixeira‘s services, Swish represents a possible Plan B for a first base.

Carlos Quentin & Jermaine Dye are locked into Chicago’s corner outfield spots, and Paul Konerko & Jim Thome fill the first base & DH spots, meaning Swish is seemingly a man without a position. Even though he could play centerfield in a pinch, he’s not equipped to man that spot on a full-time basis. He’s played first more than any other position in his career, committing just 10 errors in over 1,660 total chances (.994 fielding %) at the first sack.

Despite the down season, Swish still did what he does best in 2008: get on base. His 82 walks were good for eighth in the league, and he led the majors by a significant margin with 4.51 pitches seen per plate appearance. Take a second to get your head around that number. Never one to hit for a high average, Swish’s line drive rate (20.9%) was the best of his career in 2008, but his .251 BABIP was a career low, suggesting that his .219 batting average may have been the product of some plain ol’ bad luck. His IsoP was down a touch to .191, but he still managed to send 24 balls into the people. A switch-hitter, Swish hits for more pop from the left side, but hits for a higher avg from the right.

Drafted one pick after Scott Kazmir and one pick before Cole Hamels in 2002, Swisher’s tool set is still a desirable one despite the down year. More athletic than he looks, Swish’s defense doesn’t compare to Teixeira’s, but he’s very good at first and adequate at the three outfield spots. Anyone who saw him during his time in Oakland knows he’s a great clubhouse guy (I didn’t see him much with the Sox, so I can’t speak to that), always the first one on the top step to high-five a teammate after a big hit. He would provide the Yanks a great deal of roster flexibility, capable of staying in the lineup at another position if, say Juan Miranda gets hot for two weeks.

So what would it take to get Mr. Swisher? I have no frickin’ idea. Kenny Williams is rumored to be on the lookout for a centerfielder/leadoff hitter, and presumably pitching. Johnny Damon might be a candidate to head to the South Side, but that would open up a hole in the outfield to fill a hole on the infield. A straight one-for-one deal is unlikely. Swisher’s contract is reasonable (he’s locked up for $21.05M total over the next three years w/ a $10.25M option or $1M buyout for 2012), and unlike Xavier Nady this summer, the Yanks would be buying low on the former Ohio State star.

Teixeira might be the sexy name, but Swish offers the same on-base skills from both sides of the plate while still providing a good amount of power and above-avg defense, all without the hassle of Scott Boras and a nine-figure contract negotiation. He hasn’t been on the disabled list since a shoulder issue sidelined him for three weeks during his rookie season, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t point out that he has a plus-plus girlfriend. What do you think, seems like Swish would be a solid buy-low candidate, right?

Categories : Hot Stove League
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The New York writers have kept themselves busy over this past week, running the floor to bring us rumor after rumor from the GM meetings. While we know that the bulk of these rumors mean little or nothing, we still like to toss them around and drop our two cents. Today, we get some peeps about the Yankees pitching targets, namely Jake Peavy and CC Sabathia.

We’ll start with Peavy. Mark Feinsand has a tidbit on the Padres righty:

The Yankees could put together a package built around Phil Hughes and Austin Jackson, according to a source, although they would likely have to include two or three more players, one of which could be Ian Kennedy. The Padres, according to the source, have no interest in Robinson Cano.

As always, beware the anonymous source. Yes, the Yankees could do that, but there’s only a small chance they will. It would mean talks have been exhausted with all NL teams, and even then the Yankees would likely have to add dollars and/or years to Peavy’s contract. He’s not going to waive his no trade clause for nothing, as he’s made clear through his agent Barry Axelrod.

The tireless Ken Davidoff says this won’t happen. Then again, he also said that the chances of Moose coming back is one percent, so we should get a chance soon to gauge his predictive accuracy. He also puts the kibosh on the Matsui to Seattle rumor, which sounded pretty frivolous from the outset. Now, if he could only kill those Lowe rumors.

Not everything is sunshiny for the Yanks, though. Davidoff brings up a scenario under which the Angels could snatch up CC Sabathia, even if the Yankees are the high bidders. It would start with the Angels letting Mark Teixeira walk. While that’s not a highly likely scenario, word is from Terry Reagins’s lips that the team won’t wait around forever awaiting his decision.

So how could the Angels then get CC without being the high bidder? If they top the $137.5 million, six-year contract signed by Johan Santana last winter, Sabathia could be content. We’ve talked about the pressure from the union to take top dollar, but the pressure might not be as intense if CC raises the bar for pitcher salaries. The union might raise a stink if CC wants to take a six year, $120 million offer from the Angels when a six year, $140 million deal is on the table from the Yankees. But if the Yankees are offering $150 million and the Angels are offering $140, he might take the slightly lower, yet still record-breaking, salary to play on the West Coast.

All of this is to say that we have no freaking clue how this off-season is going to pan out. Plenty of people say they are “convinced” CC will be a Yank. Others (::cough:: Mike Pop) think Burnett in pinstripes is inevitable. However, there is no sure thing during the Hot Stove.

Comments (59)

Via MLBTR comes a rumor about Hideki from Yahoo’s Tim Brown:

One source mentioned a potential three-way deal that would send outfielder Hideki Matsui from the New York Yankees to the Seattle Mariners for a pitching prospect, perhaps Ryan Rowland-Smith. The Yankees would package the prospect with second baseman Robinson Cano and another young player to the Rockies for Matt Holliday.

The Mariners wouldn’t trade Ryan Rowland-Smith for Matsui. The Yankees aren’t going to try to acquire Holliday unless they miss out on Teixeira. Have fun with this one, but don’t take it seriously at all. By the way, that other young player in the Rockies’ half of the day would probably be Phil Hughes.

Comments (71)
  • Change … free agents may not believe in
    By

    As you may already know, President Elect Barack Obama has proposed to increase the federal income tax rate for the top bracket from 35% to 39.6%. The AP (via ESPN) points out that if a free agent signs after January 1st, his signing bonus would likely be taxed at the new rate, costing them an additional 4.6%. So if Mark Teixeira is looking to match Jason Giambi’s $17M signing bonus, he’d would stand to save himself nearly $800,000 by agreeing to a deal before New Year’s. I thought this was pretty interesting, and if we see a mad dash of guys signing just before the calender turns to 2009, this might be why. · (53) ·

Via Davidoff:

There are rumblings that Pettitte wants a two-year deal, and that won’t be happening with the Yankees, who would ask Pettitte to accept a one-year offer in the neighborhood of $10 million. Pettitte made $16 million each of the past two years.

Pettitte hasn’t even filed for free agency yet, but when he does, and if this staredown is still going on with between Pettitte and the Yankees, expect the Astros to try to bring Pettitte back to his hometown. The Astros, from owner Drayton McLane to manager Cecil Cooper to ace Roy Oswalt, are very fond of Pettitte. It’s a saga on which to keep an eye.

We’ve written enough about Pettitte since the season has ended to eschew the analysis. Suffice it say, the Yankees should not, under any circumstances, give Andy Pettitte a guaranteed two-year contract. I’m not even sure I’d give the lefty one year. If Pettitte goes to the Astros, so be it.

Categories : Hot Stove League
Comments (132)
  • A-Rod + Scott BFF 4ever
    By

    According to Scott Boras, his relationship with A-Rod is all better. The über-agent and A-Rod fell out of each other’s good graces last winter when Boras did or did not botch the whole opt-out thing. Of course, if you believe in conspiracy theories, Boras was never out of favor with A-Rod; he did after all secure a much better deal for A-Rod than the one out of which the slugger opted. Someone had to take the fall for A-Rod’s PR hit. Either way, they’re tight again. Phew. · (6) ·

Over the last two years, we’ve talked a lot about the new Yankee Stadium. While the Yankees originally claimed they were footing the bill for construction and that the costs to taxpayers would be minimal, a small but vocal group of writers and analysts attuned to baseball economics disputed this claim.

Today, after politicians have wrung city and team officials through the gamut of some Congressional hearings, The Times offers up an analysis of the rising costs to the public of the new stadiums. For what its worth, the total cost for Yankee Stadium has now ballooned to $1.7 billion, up for an original estimate a few years ago of $1.2 billion. May, how times have changed.

Charles V. Bagli offers up this summary:

As the two stadiums near completion, the cost to taxpayers is anything but small, a review of the projects shows. Though the teams are indeed paying about $2 billion to erect the two stadiums, the cost to the city for infrastructure — parks, garages and transportation improvements — has jumped to about $458 million, from $281 million in 2005. The state is contributing an additional $201 million.

Those totals do not include an estimated $480 million in city, state and federal tax breaks granted to both teams. In addition, neither team has to pay rent or property taxes, though both are playing on city-owned land.

The expanding public cost of the stadiums, coming in another downturn, has fueled debate about their economic benefits, and has become an issue in Congressional hearings in Washington into the use of tax-exempt bonds for stadium construction.

Now, we can debate whether or not, as Yankee and city officials claim, that stadiums spur economic development. While politicians claim they do, most economists agree that stadiums never deliver these promised benefits. What we can’t deny is that, at a time in which the city’s finances are looking rather bleak, the city has given a significant level of money to very wealthy baseball teams, and that’s just not very good government.

Categories : Yankee Stadium
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